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Look what I found when I tore my old fireplace out.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by tlhfirelion, Jul 10, 2008.

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  1. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    It's the same stove I have in my workshop. Pedestal with ash drawer. My instructions call for 0.446 in the hearth. Never paid it much attention, because mine's on 12" of masonry set atop a concrete slab...no combustibles at all beneath. Rick

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  2. tlhfirelion

    tlhfirelion Member

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    The stove veneer I'm using is 1.5" thick and this chart from hearth.com shows morter at .20. Even if I just get .30 out of both the morter and the stone, I am already over the min. of .46 with 1 layer of cement board at .52. I mean no offense by this at all, but who do I beleive? You or this chart from hearth.com? I want to be safe and also not waste money.

    http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/k_values_what_does_it_all_mean
  3. tlhfirelion

    tlhfirelion Member

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    Have you been happy with this stove overall? Any glaring issues or shortcomings?
  4. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    If you have reliable data on it, then by all means go with that...I had the impression you were putting something much thinner than that on there for some reason. One sheet of Durock should do the job nicely. Sorry if I steered you off track. Rick
  5. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Very happy with it, it's a nice little stove. Break-in fires will be pretty smelly...do them when you can have lots of ventilation. The stove's easy to live with, burns nicely, and the airwash is very effective at keeping the glass clean. I don't often bother with using the removeable floor firebrick/ash drawer feature, I usually just shovel the ashes out the door into a bucket. I like this stove, it serves me very well. Rick

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  6. tlhfirelion

    tlhfirelion Member

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    OH...ok. Corssed wires then no biggie.
  7. tlhfirelion

    tlhfirelion Member

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    man that is a sweet shop you have there. I'd show you mine but nobody wants to see that dungeon. Glad to hear it serves you well. Yeah I figure some the fall I'll send the wife to the movies or something and break it in. Do you get a decent burn time? 6 or 7 hours? Thats all I would need with our schedule.
  8. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, I really can't speak for the max burn time, as I typically don't load it up to the gills...and so far, anyway, my wife hasn't banished me to the shop overnight. I'm retired, and I spend a lot of time in the shop, though. During the burning season, I'd say I typically light it about 9 AM or so most every day, and burn in it steadily through the day until about 6 PM or thereabouts. My shop is not large, so I burn it steadily but at a modest rate, and I feed it additional splits throughout the day from time to time...plus, all I have to burn is softwood. With a good bed of coals and a nice load of wood, it will go into a real nice slow secondary burn while maintaining a good stovepipe temp, so if you've got good hardwood and you learn to load it to maximum effect, I imagine you could get 6 or 7 hours out of it with some remaining coals for relight. You'll figure out what works for you. Rick
  9. tlhfirelion

    tlhfirelion Member

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    Hey guys. so I'm ready to get my order together for my double wall pipe (interior and exterior) as well as the elbows and wall thimble. Now the area that I plan to pass thru my wall and into my old chase fireplace (exterior) is 27" tall by 14.5" wide behind the drywall. My stove requires 6" pipe so thats what I plan to use all the way out. My first question is regarding the wall thimble. Does this attach to the wall studs and if so, how big are these thimbles on average? I'm not sure if I need to bring my studs in closer together or move them further apart.

    Next question is what brand would be a good entry level brand of pipe? I don't want a cadillac of pipes but I don't want the yugo of pipes either. Just a good pipe for a fair price. I was looking over at ventingpipe.com and they seem to have everything I would need, but not sure what brand to follow.

    Thanks!
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