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Looking for wood/gas (propane) combo boiler

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by gimmegas, Nov 26, 2012.

  1. Same here, but it's been a few decades for the nuggets

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  2. Fred61

    Fred61 Minister of Fire

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    Can anybody tell me what they are?
  3. Don't know but can't be any worse than pink slime in the burgers.
  4. kopeck

    kopeck Minister of Fire

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    Dunno but I bet they would gassify!

    I'm not a twit but I do have a bookface account.

    For what it's worth I don't care for the mess in my basement but it's better then walking out in a blizzard. :)

    I'm trying half cord racks this year. Keep a cord or so in the basement and the reset can stay out in the shed until I need it. Undoubtedly that means I'll run out on the coldest day of the year and be refilling my racks and grumbling to my self all the while...

    K
    Taylor Sutherland likes this.
  5. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Ground up chicken fibres pressed into golf ball sized nuggets - except kinda flattened, not round - with a crunchy golden brown exterior.

    Kind of like wood pellets, only bigger & tastier.

    Not that I've tasted wood pellets...
  6. Fred61

    Fred61 Minister of Fire

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    I knew there was a reason not to eat them. I went to a chicken bar-b-que one day and the guy cooking was turning the chicken halves with gloved hands, I'll bet that those gloves were the tastiest things there but I still ordered the chicken.
  7. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    K- good stuff on rationale for storage. Less waste = better use of resources. I like that formula. If they make American Solartechnics in Maine, I'm all over it. How do I get in touch w/ Tom?
  8. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Find where he's posted on the board (search for 'Tom In Maine') - or just do a member search - and start a conversation with him.
  9. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    MFM, could you or anyone else educate me on Lambda? I just thought it was a Greek letter 'til now? I'm definitely in the house as long as it (boiler) doesn't smoke it up. Thanks- Gimme
  10. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Lambda boilers incorprate an oxygen sensor in the flue pipe, and automatically regulate air intake into the primary & secondary chambers depending on oxygen output.
    gimmegas likes this.
  11. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    K, who has Tarm and where are they? Garn, anyone up there w/ them? OK. Now I need to know a little about $ since you brought it up. How much dinero do I need to put the beast in the basement, w/ 800-1000 gal storage and radiant heat in say a 30x 40 basement, same dimension first floor and a loft of 30 x 20? (All new const.) Anyone out there can chime in, but since you did the radiant heat thing, you might be able to give me a good guestimate. Thanks- G.
  12. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    JP, I sent this in response to Kopeck, which was only part right. YOU did the Radiant, so this (radiant part) applies more to YOU. (apologies to K, I need another home brew) who has Tarm and where are they? Garn, anyone up there w/ them? OK. Now I need to know a little about $ since you brought it up. How much dinero do I need to put the beast in the basement, w/ 800-1000 gal storage and radiant heat in say a 30x 40 basement, same dimension first floor and a loft of 30 x 20? (All new const.) Anyone out there can chime in, but since you did the radiant heat thing, you might be able to give me a good guestimate. Thanks- G.
  13. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    Thanks, Maple. I guess it's a good thing and would assume it's an extra? Worth the cash to get it? Yes? No? Anyone........
  14. JP11

    JP11 Minister of Fire

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    Sorry.. It's been about six years since I put in the radiant. I did A LOT of it when I was doing it. I got really good at it.. just about the time I was finished. :)

    All I know is I spent WAY TOO MUCH on the house. :)

    Sorry. I bet some guys on here are smart enough to get you started. You could probably help by coming up with how many zones you want. You could start pricing manifolds, pumps, the pipe.. and build up a list.

    There's A TON of labor in laying out the pipes and tying it down to grid to keep it from floating during your concrete pour. You could save a lot there.

    Similar.. there's a lot of labor to put the pipes stapled up under your subfloor. I did not use the transfer plates, but borrowed my plumbers special stapler that holds the pipe tight, but lets it move a bit side to side.

    JP
  15. JP11

    JP11 Minister of Fire

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    If you are only asking about cost of the wood boiler itself... I had scrounged tanks that cost me next to nothing. I think all in I was in the 13 to 14k dollar range. Wood only add on. That's not any of the costs of my original oil boiler or controls or radiant.
  16. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Lambda: Yes, it's extra. I suspect generally that those who have it say its worth it, and those that don't say they're fine without it & it's not worth the extra.

    It does add complexity and more potential for things to fail I suppose. Mechanical simplicity and minimal gadgetry & electricity dependance was a primary consideration for me, everyones primary considerations will differ.
  17. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    Maple, Also good to know I'm in the right neighborhood w/ the space. I'd hate to have it all done and then say Oh____! Yes, fortunately my wife likes to cook, and so propane seems like a good choice based on our location- out in the boonies. May put a propane heater in the great room instead of having to lug wood in and won't have to worry about another chimney, etc. Any thoughts on that...
  18. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    Did you have radiant w/ your oil? and then went to wood??
  19. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    Thanks, Maple. I'll probably cross it off my must have list.
  20. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    Maple, got it Thank you.
  21. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    Ozzie, OK. I'm sold on the storage thing. Thanks, neighbor.
  22. Fred61

    Fred61 Minister of Fire

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    Boy, it's hard to say if these advances are worth it or not. The guy that puts in an old pot belly wood stove full of holes and is alot warmer loves the thing. The guy that sold it to him hated it and upgraded to a Vermont Castings loves it. The guy that upgraded from a Vermont Castings stove installs an outdoor wood boiler and loves it. In a few years he upgrades to a gasser and loves it. Who would want more? Now the lamda. It may depend on your particular situation as to whether these advances are good for you so anyone that has only seen one side is basically unqualified to answer the question.
    I'm one of the few on this forum that has operated two different gassers so I feel I'm qualified to compare these two but can't comment on others. So when a guy with a particular gasser loves his, what does it mean?
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  23. gimmegas

    gimmegas New Member

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    UNfortunately, JP, I will have to continue to work during construction so i won't be much help w/ the installation of the radiant. Obviously you think it (radiant) is worth the time and $ in the long run. 6k is a lot of sq ft!! Do you think I could get by w/o doing the basement and just do radiant in the main floors? How much wood/yr do you burn??
  24. kopeck

    kopeck Minister of Fire

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    Revision Heat, they're in Portland and Brewer.

    Very good folks to deal with. Don't discount local parts/support! I don't know about Garn, you would have to do so leg work there.

    I have 10k in mine more or less, probably a little more as there's lots of odds and ends that get added as you go but you never think about. I did the install my self so that helped keep the bill down.

    K
  25. JP11

    JP11 Minister of Fire

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    You would actually do the opposite. Bury the pipe in the concrete. It's the most efficient.. and a GREAT use of wood boiler storage water.. as you could heat your tanks to 195.. then run em all the way down to 100 or so. (the radiant in the concrete runs at 100 to 110 degrees or so.)

    It's very slow to respond.. you set the thermostat and forget it. The heat "lost" from your basement would be heat gained by your first floor.

    I'm not very well versed on radiators.. but I think there's some newer stuff out there that would work for baseboards or wall radiators that would work on your first floor. My first floor is running 140 degree water.. so I stop using my wood boiler, and the oil boiler comes on at 135 degrees.

    This is my first winter.. but I'm guessing 8 to 10 cords. I've got a lot of softwoods that were blown down during Irene.. so I'm guessing I'll be on the high side this year. I ran over 1500 gallons of oil last winter.. and it was a mild one!! (I was running about 70% my own homeade fuel made from french fry grease... so the cost sting wasn't as bad)

    over 6k sf heated. Includes my wife's attached photo studio. Keeping it even warmer this year.. wood boiler is great.

    JP

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