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Mann axe

Post in 'The Gear' started by Arlo, Nov 25, 2007.

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  1. Arlo

    Arlo New Member

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  2. Gene K.

    Gene K. New Member

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    Oh, that's a beauty! If you ever get tired of it, holler in my direction.

    You are keeping it sharp, right? A good honing or stropping after every day's use makes life so easy down the road. I'm not trying to lecture on this subject, but I can assure you from personal experience that this advice does make a world of difference.

  3. Arlo

    Arlo New Member

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    Been practicing honing on my other axe. What would you recomend for this one? stropping? Whats the best? Im new at this old Axe thing, but am quickly falling in love with the buetty of these old axes! My house is all antiques and this axe makes me feel like Richard Proenneke ! LOL
  4. WILDSOURDOUGH

    WILDSOURDOUGH New Member

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    Arlo-

    DON'T USE THAT AXE !
    (sorry for holloring)
    That axe is an collectable art object- It is beautiful and worth many more bucks than some old wood you thinking of splitting.

    please-please don't 'practice' sharpning with it, practice on some 'cheapo' axe- if you get good enough with the 'cheapo', you will be able to sharpen your good ones--- but not the 'art axe'.

    Put a thin coat of nice light oil on the head- maybe like sewing machine oil- let it set for 1/2 hour or so, then wipe it off, and do NOTHING to the handle. Make a nice display rack for it, and display it ! It is a wonderful piece of americana.

    You might want to have it apprased- I bet you would be suprised.
  5. Arlo

    Arlo New Member

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    I have only used it to split some seasoned wedges. I haven't practiced honing on this one. Its sharp as hell! It'll slice ya if you run your finger down it. I practice honing on my box store special. I'm already making a hanger for it to display on my wall but I can't help myself to use it! I guess your right though, it really is a piece of history. I think I will re-evaluate my future use of it. From the research I did on it, I was able to find out that it's a Mann Rockaway pattern from either 1922 or 1928.

    Thanks for the redirection! Sometimes we all need to hear it from someone! Oh by the way I paid $30.00 for it in some antique store in lewistown PA. Suprisingly enough, thats where the Mann Edge & Tool company existed. Me and the wife were looking at the area for real estate and we stumbled upon the store.
  6. Arlo

    Arlo New Member

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    just picked this up off E-bay to hang with it in a frame on the wall ! Neat huh? Coolest part is June 15th is my birthday! LOL

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  7. Gene K.

    Gene K. New Member

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    Well first, before I respond to your question, I have to disagree with those who say to not use the axe. Axes are tools mean to be used, and as long as it's treated well, it will always look good. Indeed, a good axe with proper care will last through generations. The most that you would have to do is to replace the handle. But, if you feel uncomfortable sharpening it, feel free to practice on a cheapie from your local hardware store. Just bear in mind that the low-end axes such as the "Truper" brand that are out there are made from garbage steel, so you'll never get the best results. I know this from personal experience.

    Now, onto sharpening:

    My first suggestion is to read "An Ax to Grind" by Bernie Weisgerger. Once I started using axes, I proceeded to find everything I could, including old scouting manuals. But, without a doubt, this book is the most complete, thorough book I've ever read on the subject, including details sharpening instructions and usage techniques. You can either view it online or download the PDF file, which I personally find easier to read, by visiting:
    http://scoutmaster.typepad.com/my_weblog/2006/02/an_axe_to_grind.html

    Now, what I do after a day's axe work is use the fine side of my honing stone. If the axe seems a little duller, perhaps from limbing or other reasons, I'll use the rough side, then the fine side. While honing, I've found the best way is to clamp the axe to a bench with a c-clamp. On the other hand, if I've only used it for a little light chopping, I strop it on a piece of cardboard. When I ever need to provide extra sharpening to an axe, I use a file. What method to use is a judgement call based upon inspection of th eaxe. Regardless of what you use, NEVER use an electric bench grinder. Not only does it have the potential to ruin the temper, but it works so quickly that any simple mistake, such as a muscular tic, will quickly ruin the edge. Working methodically by hand provides a feedback which is hard to beat.

    Here's the good news: if your axe is already razor sharp, just follow the existing edges with your honing stone. As long as you follow the old practice of providing a little sharpening after every use and follow the edge, it will always stay sharp.

    When you're all done, make sure to wipe a light coating of oil on the axe in order to prevent rust.

  8. Arlo

    Arlo New Member

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    thanks axe man. I used it today to de-bark and whiddle a log bench. It's a great axe! I will be using it but not abusively. I'm making a hanger for it on the wall to store for easy acces to split kindling and such. Thanks for the instructional link, I did not know alot of the info in there. I will follow his guide. Thanks again!
  9. kjklosek

    kjklosek New Member

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    Attach some wet/dry sandpaper to a board about 2" wide and 10" long.

    Start with the coarsest necessary to get the edge in shape 80 or 120. Then progress from 220 to whatever you want to go to. Up to 2000 grit if you want, which will give a mirror polish. Strop if you like on the rough side of a piece of leather. If you want it super shiny get some jewelers rouge or rottenstone to charge the leather.

    Use a file for coarse work to remove chips and dings and general shaping of the blade.

    I would think filing and some 220 grit paper is a lot for an axe, but it just depends on how far you want to take it.

    Nice tool by the way.

    J.P.
  10. Arlo

    Arlo New Member

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    I like that idea. Thanks! I'll post a pic when it's polished up.
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