melting point of regular pink fiberglass

rmcfall Posted By rmcfall, Jan 26, 2007 at 2:04 AM

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  1. rmcfall

    rmcfall
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    Nov 28, 2005
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    Does anyone know what temperature is needed to melt regular pink fiberglass?
    And no, I am not considering using regular fiberglass for a liner. Just pure curiosity here.
     
  2. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg
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    Actually owens corning dies their fiberglass pink it really is white Jon mansvill uses yellow
     
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg
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    common fiberglass insulation has a melting point of 1300 degrees and a boiling point of 1000 degres Considering a chimney fire exceeds 1700 degrees, fiberglass does not afford block off area protection
    Mineral wool melting point is 2000 degrees

    Don't know if this is what your are looking for Mo Heat told me once not to leave one post behind

    well I tried
     
  4. lnh62

    lnh62
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    Dec 1, 2006
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    Are those degrees F or C?

    Would expanded vermiculite work OK as a chimney insulation material? I believe it's melting point is somewhere around 2400F.
     
  5. webbie

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    The type of Fg used for home insulation has glues and binder in it that seem to reduce the temp rating.

    From my experience, it is only good up until about 700 degrees before it starts changing composition.

    Rock and mineral wool can be had in quantity at certain drywall supply houses - just FYI. Although this is usually rated lower than kaowool, it is good for well over 1,000 degrees F (I think to 1500-1700) which is dang hot!
     
  6. Corey

    Corey
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    How can the insulation boil at 1000 and melt at 1300? Maybe something is reversed here?

    Corey
     
  7. tjg911

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    My 1st house came with an old pot bellied stove. There was a date of either 1909 or 1929 on it and the window was mica. The base was cast iron and it had a moderate sized hole in it. I was told to plug the hole with fg insulation. I thought the heat would would melt the fg insulation but it worked just fine. I burned coal and wood in that stove and as you know coal burns a lot hotter.

    Tom
     
  8. rmcfall

    rmcfall
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    those numbers are what I was curious about. Thanks everyone.
     
  9. elkimmeg

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    I want to add to what Web said he is correct adhiesives are added to the manufacturing process and other material that lowers the melting point of what I stated

    I also errored in the process of melting the silicas into fiberglass strands metals are added to make the strans appear pink
    John Mansvill insulation is white not yellow and Certanteed is yellow
     
  10. Gooserider

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    I'm sure Elk will correct me if I'm wrong, but some of the other threads have mentioned that some of the "pour in" liner insulation kits are made with vermiculite.... Some have even pointed out that you can get vermiculite at your local garden center, but I don't know if it's the same stuff or if it would have other combustible material mixed in with it that would be bad news to use for that application.

    Gooserider
     
  11. Beanscoot

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    I came across this old post in a search for something else. Several times I have put chunks of fiberglass insulation in my woodstove and it slowly melts and fuses to make compact clinker type slag. This was not in abnormally hot fires either.
     
  12. MishMouse

    MishMouse
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    Probably not a good idea for you, your wood stove, your chimney or anyone who lives near you to burn fiberglass insulation in your wood stove. :sick:
     
  13. Beanscoot

    Beanscoot
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    Fiberglass doesn't burn; it's glass. It melts. As a hazard, it rates about the same as "burning" chunks of fire bricks in your stove. That said, I'm not recommending for or against others to melt it in their stoves.

    Think of the children.
     
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