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Military Yukon M1950 Wood Stove Installation Questions

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by FFTitus, Mar 22, 2014.

  1. FFTitus

    FFTitus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Rhode Island
    Good morning fellow wood burning ladies and gents,
    I thought I would sign up after following this site for a long time and start posting & answering questions here officially.

    I have recently purchased after doing research a mobile military yukon M1950 wood stove. Mine was made in 1990 I think, I'll double check that when I get home. I absolutely LOVE it. The amount of BTU is claims to put out, to how light weight and compact it is.

    I am looking to install one in my basement, through my small window in the corner. I have been reading how I would need to install the proper fire rated insert to replace the window, then the chimney.

    I am basically looking to install this during the cold months for the basement then remove it and when I go camping, have the ability to take it with me for outdoor use, then reinstall in the winter again.

    The chimney I have a few questions about. I've already spoke with the town and I am legally allowed to do it myself. The length of the chimney is what I am questioning. Since it is coming from the basement, would I need to run it the entire length of the home then over the roof X amount of feet? Or can I do like what I have at work? I've included a photo of that setup now. That exhaust is from our pellet stove.

    Here are a few photos of the stove, then a few generic photos or video to give you an idea of what it looks like. I will post photos & a video of where I am wanting to install it in the basement when I get off shift.

    Thank you all for taking the time to read this & have a great day!

    Attached Files:

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,892
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Welcome. Pellet stove chimney rules are completely different from wood stove chimney requirements. There are no shortcuts allowed. The class A, stainless chimney will need to have proper clearances, a tee at the bottom with a proper thimble for where it enters the house. The top of the chimney must be 2 ft taller than the nearest structure within 10 ft. Usually this is the roof. Inside, the stove will need to have 36" clearance from combustibles in all directions (unless there is an NFPA 211 wall shield) and a hearth that is 18" wider than the stove in all directions. The connecting stove pipe will need to be at least 18" from all combustibles if it is single-wall pipe.
    10-3-2 rule.JPG
  3. FFTitus

    FFTitus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Rhode Island
    Thank you for the reply, so chances are then that this won't work. If I am going to be adding that length of chimney pipe, then something more permanent would make more sense would you agree?
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,892
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Unlike a camp setup the chimney on a house is infrastructure. It has to be safe, even with a chimney fire. Your plan can work as long as there is a safe chimney in the house to connect to. That said, the Yukon was not designed for 24/7 heating, year after year. If the goal is to heat the house and not have just an occasional basement warming fire then yes, a stove designed to do this would be a much better bet. The last thing you want is for a weld to fail or a door to fall off the stove when it is out of sight in the basement with a raging fire in its belly.
  5. FFTitus

    FFTitus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Rhode Island
    The basement is unfinished, with concrete walls and a floor. The window is located near the bulkhead, so I'm expecting some heat loss there.

    The idea came from dealing with the cold winters and having no place to work on projects. I'll keep this stove mobile then and use it out doors for camping, etc.

    I can really see having the stove in the basement help heat the home and continue to use it throughout the winter. We recently replaced our oil furnace & that was not cheap to say the least.

    The new stove itself, there are so many out there, it's mind numbing. How would you choose the right one for you? The local scrap yard for example has 20 to choose from. On Cl there's over 200. I assume by BTUs right?
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,892
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    I would choose a stove based on firebox size and the area size to be heated. If this is an unfinished, uninsulated basement understand that fully one third of the heat generated will head right outdoors to the earth. That means one cord out of three is wasted. If you are buying a used, pre-EPA stove even more wood will be wasted in inefficient heat going up the chimney. An EPA stove will be more efficient and use less wood. For this reason a lot of folks opt for a new Englander or Drolet stove. They are under $1000 and are good workhorses.

    Take your time, ask questions and read up all you can so that your purchase is a wise one. Also, budget for the chimney, it could cost much more than the stove depending on how tall it will end up being. This article can help you get started:

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/choosing_a_wood_stove
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/choosing_and_using_wstove
    http://www.woodheat.org/wood-appliances.html

    If you can post a picture of the approximate location for the stove that shows the wall and bulkhead we can comment on feasibility.

    PS: If you don't have a good stash of wood already split, stacked and drying, that is a major priority. Stoves burn way better with dry wood and chimneys stay much cleaner.

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