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Minwax Polyshades?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by DianeB, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. DianeB

    DianeB Feeling the Heat

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    Anyone refinish their kitchen cabinents with minwax polyshades? Wonder how it holds up over time. I just redid all my doors and doorframes with the satin version and they came out great. Cleaned them first, used mineral spirits with some light sanding and them applied 2 coats. Made me think I could do my cabinets which are already a darker type walnut. If I replace the knobs etc. when refinishing, would definitely be a big improvement but wonder if over time the "poly" in the polyshade will hold up. Any experienced users of this product out there?

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  2. FanMan

    FanMan Feeling the Heat

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    I've used it and the similar Olympic One-Step on a number of projects (cabinets, doors, bed frame, dining table, even entire room walls) and it seems to hold up very well. Definitely use the pretreatment if you're putting it over soft wood, it makes a big difference.
  3. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    If you're concerned about durability you could probably apply additional coats of clear polyurethane.
    Sanding between coats may not be required if they're done before the previous coat is fully cured and if you're happy with the finish smoothness.
  4. DianeB

    DianeB Feeling the Heat

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    Good idea - the clear poly would not add additional color over the poly shade. You mentioned doing this before previous code is fully cured. Curing on the polyshade is approx 6 hours - perhaps do this at hour 5. Could you explain how this saves on sanding>? thanks!
  5. greg13

    greg13 Feeling the Heat

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    I'm not wild about the Polyshades. I feel that hands down Minwax is the best stain made, but I just don't like the finish when you add Poly in with the stain.
  6. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    I'm with Greg. I'd rather stain THEN poly. But Minwax makes some damm good stuff, their stains and sealers are amoung the best you can get IMO.
    If you are happy with it, that's all that matters!
  7. fishingpol

    fishingpol Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, third on this. Polyshades have what looks like suspended pigment in the finish. Oil based polyurethane finish is amber colored, so it will darken wood a little. I finish a lot of wood products and sometimes use Minwax, but the Polyshades can is collecting dust on the shelf.
    ScotO likes this.
  8. DianeB

    DianeB Feeling the Heat

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    I did a desk and a bathroom vanity. They both "look" great. Just not sure how the poly will hold up. The suggestion to do the polyshade then a clear one of poly a good one. I am going darker so do not have to strip. Applying just stain over a previously sealed piece of furniture does not work as the stain won't dry, just stays sticky. The polyshade actually dries and hardens. I applied it after heavy cleaning of the item and light standing. Kitchen cabinets get a lot of wear with gummy sticky fingers. My husband a great cook, but seriously messy.
    fishingpol and ScotO like this.
  9. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

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    I used poly shade once and didn't like it... The finish had the look of the color being on the wood, not in the wood.
    ScotO likes this.
  10. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    You and fishingpol pretty much nailed it. I used in on trim in a room I revamped years ago (before we gutted the whole house), the 'stain' definately was NOT in the wood, but rather suspended IN the poly.....

    I can see where this might benefit Diane, as she's putting this polyshade on an already-stained wood, and re-staining it (especially if it's been poly-ed before) wouldn't work.....she's not sanding it all the way down. So it may be ideal for her particular situation. But I wouldn't ever want to use it on natural unfinished wood again.
  11. SlyFerret

    SlyFerret Minister of Fire

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    I used to sell a lot of the stuff when I ran a hardware store. It works if you're looking to cut corners and save time. It was popular with homeowners, rehabers, and rental maintenance crews.

    The professional craftsmen didn't buy it though. They always picked up the separate stain and poly or varnish.

    -SF
  12. FanMan

    FanMan Feeling the Heat

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    One place where the poly stain is a good choice is on textured wood where the wipe on / wipe off stain isn't practical. I used it on beaded plywood (simulated wainscoting) walls in my old cabin and I was very pleased with the results.
  13. basod

    basod Minister of Fire

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    I used it on the oak stair treads in my house. They were dark old stain - removed sanded and finished in a honey oak color.
    The old dark stain remained in the pores but it gave them a bit of an anitque look.
    It's holding up just fine, just make sure to constantly mix the can as applying it
    DianeB likes this.

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