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Morso 04 installation.

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by bmcwi, Sep 21, 2006.

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  1. bmcwi

    bmcwi New Member

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    This is my new Morso 04. I opened up a chimney breast that was closed 15 years ago when the previous owners switched from coal fired central heating to oil. I opened the breast and found the back boiler still in there. I removed this with no small amount of hassle and cleared an area below the supporting lintel, had the chimney swept and lined with stainless steel liner terminating in a register plate at the lintel. I then made good the fireplace with decorative brick and lime mortar and mixed dye in cement for a render to cover the back and top of the hearth. The mantel was donated to me from waste timber, planed, sanded and varnished as shown. - Belfast, N.I.

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  2. Willhound

    Willhound Feeling the Heat

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    Nice Barry, and welcome.

    How is the wood situation in N.I. ? Is it easy to come by, or do you have to buy it all? Is wood heat a viable option, or just something for ambience?
  3. Harley

    Harley Minister of Fire

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    Nice installation - all that work looks like it paid off. How is the weather there this time of year? Have you fired up the stove yet?
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Very, very nice work.
  5. bmcwi

    bmcwi New Member

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    Hi all!

    Thanks for the (ahem) warm welcome :)

    The wood situation in NI is - you buy it, unless you've a farm - and unfortunately the family farm was sold after my grandfather passed on, twenty five years ago!

    Fortunately my generous girlfriend's family own two timber businesses, building sheds and fences for all sorts of purposes, so I get aged and seasoned timber offcuts from them! Because of the massive rises in gas (which was until last year in the UK and Ireland the largest growth sector of the heating industry here) and latterly oil, solid fuel fires are right back in the frame for heating requirements. For years Ulster folk have sought to block up fireplaces and remove chimney stacks for 'aesthetic' purposes (I know, I know, I always considered a good fire the centre of a home...but there's no accounting for taste..) - according to my sweep and the chimney liner installers they have never been busier with enquiries on reopening sealed chimneys.

    For me, my house's heating is oil fired, in a large terraced house built in 1930. It's fine for all rooms except the living room, which the previous owners had a wall removed from so instead of a dining room and living room/lounge it's all in one, and the two radiators never really made the place cosy last winter. If I built my own house I would seriously consider one of those wood-pellet boilers (don't know if you've seen them) that auto-feed, giving the automatic performance of an oil boiler, but using renewable energy. I'd also install a nice centrepiece stove with a back boiler for extra heating. Hope I'm not rattling on too much, Willhound!

    Harley - cheers! I'd have lined the chimney myself too but I'm not much for heights and the three hundred quid I'd have saved by doing it myself isn't enough to coax me up on to a steep, windy roof :) The weather here was very mild, and is still warm for the time of year (almost 20 celcius) but we're in the outskirts of a hurricane which is en-route. We're used to high winds and foul weather but I'm sure this will cause a few power outages!

    I fired up the stove just last week for the first time. Great job. Consumes little fuel compared to an open fire, and the stove remains hot for the most of an hour after. I was thinking about an open fire at one time but I'm real glad I went with the stove.

    How about you fellas - Ontario and Mass.? I've been to both Seattle and Chicago in the depths of winter (I used to work for Allstate) and I know it gets far, far colder there than it does in Ireland during the winter...
  6. Rover 1

    Rover 1 Member

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    Hi Barry:

    One question I have is can you burn peat in that?

    I expect peat is quite a bit cheaper than wood in that area, even though you get yours from the "inlaws" I wondered how it compares to someone who dosn't have connections.

    Thanks in advance
    Ed
  7. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

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    Welcome nice setup...i was wondering about the peat also..

    Congrats, interesting to see something from up there.
  8. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

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    Welcom to the forum mate. Nice work.
  9. bmcwi

    bmcwi New Member

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    That's a good question. Although a 'multi-fuel' stove the fuel types listed in the manual confine themselves to only wood or smokeless coal. But I don't see why it shouldn't be suitable to burn peat briquettes if it can burn coal!

    The '0' range from Morso was more expensive than other stoves - but I liked the 'contemporary' design, the good air control system and the good interior space relative to it's exterior compactness. I was tempted to buy a Franco-Belge stove because a friend had one and swore by it - but it's a bit more ornamental looking, and the interior size is smaller I think.
  10. Harley

    Harley Minister of Fire

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    Cheers, Barry
    In this part of the state, we get an annual snowfall average of about 110 or so inches. Enough to keep me busy shoveling, but no where near the amounts in other parts of the country. It gets pretty chilly here as well during the dead of winter, with a lot of sub-zero days, but again, its nothing like some of our northern or western neighbors.

    Winter is not here yet... still looking forward to a few nice weekends to take the bike out for a ride before it gets put away for the winter.

    Enjoy your new installation.... I'm sure it will take the chill out of that room.
  11. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    That looks very nice. I'll bet it fits with the house well.

    It's very nice to hear from people on the other side of the pond, since we generally don't too often.

    So, does that stove have secondary burn tubes like the EPA approved wood burners here?

    Just curious, since at one point I was considering a Morso 1410...either coal or wood, and I found that there is actually two different stoves that are sold here. The coal version has no secondary burn tubes, and an additional air inlet at the bottom of the door, plus a couple diverter plates in the bottom to direct the coal towards the shaker grates.

    I'm just curious how they get "multi-fuel" out of a stove there in one package.
  12. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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  13. bmcwi

    bmcwi New Member

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    I don't know what secondary burn tubes are! (but they sound like A Good Thing) - but here's a bit of blurb (again from stovesonline.co.uk) about the preheated air the 0 series from Morso uses:
    http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/cleanburn-cleanheat-stove.html

    I know the air controls can be set to use secondary air (the preheated stuff, when at operating temp) or a combination of secondary and primary air (from the room) for an extra-hot blaze.

    So Harley...I'm guessing you ride a Harley? If I had one I'd put it away for winter too. I ride my ol' BMW K75S all year round, but then we don't get much snow here!

    There's a pub near here with a very old fashioned, original fireplace. It's just a great big open hearth with a similarly large, bowl-shaped iron grate, that they burn coal in during the winter. It's quite a draw when the frost sets in (naturally, I'd never go there just for the great ale they bring over from England). ;)
  14. jtcedinburgh

    jtcedinburgh New Member

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    I missed this first time around...

    Yes, but only in the UK model - the US model doesn't do multi-fuel - it's wood only. Very strange to have this distinction, but...

    On the Owl (3410) I have two air controls at the front - from below and from above - and at the rear, a third control which is fixed (which provides the secondary air from tubes at the rear). The Morso 04 is very similar in its approach - well, the larger 06 is, which was the other stove we considered. We went with the Owl because it has full smokeless zone approval and was fractionally cheaper, but I don't believe that there's much in it. The other stove we considered was the Charnwood Cove II, which is a very nice looking stove.

    john
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