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Moving baseboard to install hearth

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by jslinger, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. jslinger

    jslinger Member

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    Had a superbowl party last night. My friend who will be installing the pad for our XXV was there evaluating the proposed location of installation.
    We were planning on having him eventually install a hearth. There is a baseboard heating element that is in the way. I know I would have to call someone to do the job. Does anyone have any idea what it would cost to move the 10ft baseboard to another wall?
    My friend installed a hearth for my brother and we really like the look of stonework on the wall. But we are not sure if it will be worth the cost of moving the baseboard.
    He said he could build around it, but that it wouldn't look very good.
    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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  2. john193

    john193 Minister of Fire

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    Sure you can move it, but is your baseboard an adjustable size? If not, you can either get a new one, or tie it downstairs and bypass the room it was in. The latter choice being your cheapest. Otherwise you are looking at new copper piping, drilling new holes in your floor and finally connecting the baseboard. We had a similar issue, not that it was in the way, we just don't like the look of baseboards. So we removed them from the living room (where the stove is) and the lines were just reconnected via the basement to complete the circuit.

    Edit our basement is not finished so we had easy access. Kept costs low.
  3. TheMightyMoe

    TheMightyMoe Minister of Fire

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    It really depends on how accessible ALL the piping is.

    If the piping is easy to access, if pex is usable, are things that can affect the cost dramatically.

    If all I have to do is add some 90*s, cap some old lines, plumb some lines directly, and hang-up base board, that is a 2-4 hour job. (Low ball)

    If I have to clean up where the old baseboard was, cut through dry wall to reach pipes, run pipe through floor/walls/studs, you could be talking 5-20+ hours of work depending on the skill of the laborer.

    You could also buy a shorter base board if possible, and plumb a 90* bend to it from the original spot off the floor. Then cover the plumbing with the hearth. Probably your cheapest option, but your room may need those BTUs from the extra length of baseboard your now missing if you are not running the stove.
  4. MikeinRI

    MikeinRI New Member

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    How about build a hearth that covers it? i rmeoved my covers and backplate and built right over it. I have 2 3 foot sections under mine. I would haved moved mine but basement has finshed ceilings
  5. Brokenwing

    Brokenwing Feeling the Heat

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    It should really not be a big deal, all your doing is draining that line down, pulling the baseboard, and drilling one new whole, remounting the baseboard, and sweating a few fittings. If you have access in the basement, it should really not be that bad of a job.
  6. silverfox103

    silverfox103 Feeling the Heat

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    I don't think you're looking at that much of a job ($$$). I would guess $300 tops, providing you have easy access to the plumbing and you can reuse the baseboard. You don't really give us a lot of info, so we're kind of guessing. For example, if you have a 8 foot strip of baseboard, you may find that you would be able to use a 4 or 6 footer in it's place. That probably would be the easiest solution and cheapest. As said you could eliminate that piece of heat, but that may not be a good idea in the long run. Probably your best bet would be to get a plumber to size up the job. He'll be able to quickly tell you your options.

    Tom C.
  7. lessoil

    lessoil Minister of Fire

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    FYI I built my hearth tall enough so the OAK and exhaust pipes cleared the baseboard.
    Just an idea.

    [​IMG]
    PoolGuyinCT and save$ like this.
  8. silverfox103

    silverfox103 Feeling the Heat

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    Now there is the best solution and it didn't cost anything. You my friend, get an "A".

    Tom C.
  9. don m

    don m Member

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    Maybe I missed something, but is it hydronic, or electric?........don
  10. silverfox103

    silverfox103 Feeling the Heat

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    The original poster didn't give much information; we're guessing.

    Tom C.
  11. glenc0322

    glenc0322 Minister of Fire

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    Take a picture of the area you are looking to install the hearth. Do you have a basement, crawl space ? would help to have more info on the area you are trying to remove.
  12. jslinger

    jslinger Member

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    Sorry for the lack of info.
    We have hot water baseboard. There is a drop ceiling installed in the basement below the area of concern. The tiles fit very tightly, and removing and replacing them to access the piping would be an issue. I installed a theater in that room and broke several tiles just trying to get them out.
    I am considering removing the piping cover and having the hearth built around the exposed piping. Then cut the cover to fit flush with the stonework.
    If I were to have it moved, the length would need to be halved since the only other available wall has even less available space.
  13. glenc0322

    glenc0322 Minister of Fire

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    Does the pipe have the air vents built on ? You should remove the section of pipe and replace with a solid pipe. Also sleeve a larger pipe around the cooper pipe incase you have a problem you can remove the pipe without disturbing the hearth.You would hate to have a problem with the pipe after you buried it with the hearth
  14. jslinger

    jslinger Member

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    Only the front of the cover comes off. The top is a fixed part. I have no problem cutting the top of it off.


    That is a good point. I can't imagine having to deal with an issue for something buried behind a few inches of stone.
  15. glenc0322

    glenc0322 Minister of Fire

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    you can use a grinder to cut the top and back but it makes a mess and smells bad
  16. MikeinRI

    MikeinRI New Member

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    photo.JPG photo. 2JPG.JPG photo3.JPG photo4.JPG photo5.JPG photo (8).jpg
    P38X2 likes this.
  17. jslinger

    jslinger Member

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    Thanks Mike! That is extremely helpful. I can just build a riser for my buddy to lay the stone for the pad on. And then build the back of the hearth above it. That will leave me space to manipulate the pipe without disturbing anything, should I ever need to.
  18. MikeinRI

    MikeinRI New Member

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    Taking all the tin panels off isnt to bad. After pulling a few nails out of the tin that hit the studs its not to bad. They lift right up. I could have got real creative and put louver or grates in so the baseboard heat would still work but I passed on the idea.
  19. TheMightyMoe

    TheMightyMoe Minister of Fire

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  20. PoolGuyinCT

    PoolGuyinCT Feeling the Heat

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    Super Bowl party site assessment??? Get him back sober

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