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Must Make ~2.5" Hole In Poured Concrete Foundation Wall

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by velvetfoot, Apr 21, 2014.

  1. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    I'm relocating my fuel oil tank and need to drill through the foundation wall. I've been looking at the rental places. I've seen a handheld watercooled diamond core drill. Also a handheld dry rotary hammer carbide core drill. The one place also had a mounted watercooled diamond core drill, but I didn't see it. A big concern is what to do if I hit a piece of rebar. Would a watercooled diamond core drill go through the rebar? I'm thinking perhaps a carbide tipped hole saw or maybe a sawzall. The hammer drill was quite heavy but had a pilot drill. I don't know how level and square a handheld drill can do. I'm thinking tomorrow I will take a closer look at what is called "freestand core drill" in their price sheet.

    Any suggestions?

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  2. waynewagner33

    waynewagner33 New Member

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    diamond core drill goes through rebar no issue drycore bits rebar is an issue over one foot of concrete I would suggest the one u can mount
  3. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Thanks. So possible to go through ~8" of concrete with a handheld wet diamond core drill?
    I searched on "freestand core drills"..might be a fair amount of effort to lift and mount it.
  4. waynewagner33

    waynewagner33 New Member

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    Yea not so easy to get started but definitely doable
  5. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    OK, thanks.
  6. cityboy172

    cityboy172 Member

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    Free handing a wall is not for beginners. A floor, maybe. As far as thickness, I've done 20" + with extensions. It gets a little tricky after you bottom the bit out.

    Do a wet core with a stand. The rotary hammer drill won't go through bar. A dry core will struggle through bar alot, and might make it through. A wet core will go through bar just fine. It will slow down a little while going through the bar, but usually won't cause a problem (unless you cut a sliver of bar). Keep in mind that all failed attempts will forever be in your wall, so do it right the first time.
  7. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Yep, and the first time will be MY first time. :)
  8. cityboy172

    cityboy172 Member

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    If your dead set on free handing here are some pointers to help.

    To help get perfect starts every time, we made templates. Take a piece of plywood and drill a 2.5" hole in it. On a floor hole we would stand on it. On a wall hole, You could run 2 plastic anchors in it to hold it, or have a some one hold it (not reccomended for beginners). If your going to drill anchors, you might as well wall mount it though.

    Once you have your ring "scored" in the wall, lay the water to it heavy. It will fling every where. Vis queen the area off and have a shop vac ready or running the whole time. have your buddy who held the template run the shop vac to clean the water and "mud" up. Not enough water will mess your day all up. The water serves 2 purposes. to cool the "teeth" and to remove the concrete that has been cut. It comes out as "mud". If there is not enough water to remove the mud, it will be dust, and it will bind the bit.

    Have your friend that is running the shop vac make sure that your bit stays level the whole time, both ways. Every time you move, you shift the path of the bit. every time you shift the path of the bit, the slug ( the inner part of what your cutting out) and the hole will grab the bit tighter and tighter. Do it enough times, and it will bind the bit.

    I'm sure there's more, just can't think right now. The main thing is that there is a lot of things going on all at once, and if you are not aware they can cause problems.
  9. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the tips. I'm not dead set on anything, for sure.
  10. peakbagger

    peakbagger Minister of Fire

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    .I have just drilled a series of 1/2" holes with carbide bit and a a hammer drill and used a chisel to break out the resultant plug. The resulting hole is obviously quite rough but if you need to clean it up,just drill it oversize, slide a sleeve in and just grout in the sleeve. I have a friend that cut a 3'by 8' hole in his basement wall using that method. It took him awhile. The biggest hassle was breaking the resulting plug up and hauling the pieces out of the basement.

    One of the more impressive holes I did when I was working for an old papermill was a 30" horizontal hole through an old tank foundation that was 8' thick. When it was poured in the 1920's concrete was expensive so they threw granite blocks in with the pour.
  11. ironpony

    ironpony Minister of Fire

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    all good advice, 2.5 inch should be fairly easy to control. we core 4.5 by hand all the time for radon systems. how big is the line?? maybe just a 1 inch concrete bit?? oil lines are usually small diameter 1/2 inch or less??? or is this the fill line?? might want to go oversize 3 inch so you have some room in case you are out of level. instead of going thru the foundation maybe you can go thru the band board(wood) instead??
  12. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    You know, I was just thinking the same thing.

    Water or dry, and through a wall? I'm looking at some YouTube videos and it seems like dry diamond core bits are available, not just the dry carbide core bits they have at HD.
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
  13. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    The ground is sloping. The oil man, who hopefully would not be making too many visits, would have to stand on steps to reach the filler.
  14. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Stopped by the hardware/rental store today. The equipment there looks crude compared to the stuff I've seen on the web. Unless I find another rental place, I'll probably go with the hand held. The rig version there was extremely heavy and requires fours lag bolts.
  15. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Yes, usually these are 3/8" supply and return lines. If so I would think that a couple 5/8" holes would suffice.
  16. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    They are fill and vent line-2" metal pipe.
  17. ironpony

    ironpony Minister of Fire

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    we use both wet and dry bits, wet definitely work better. yes thru walls.
  18. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Thanks. My latest experience with the diamond wet saw on granite tiles was great, so wet diamond it is.
  19. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Ah, I was thinking outdoor tank. Happy nibbling, sounds like you are getting some good advice.
  20. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Yep.
  21. ironpony

    ironpony Minister of Fire

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    just had a thought, you said "foundation", so I went back and re read it you did not say if it is block or poured??? block would be a piece of cake very "soft". poured will be tougher but very do able.
  22. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Sure, now you tell me. :) The post title is: Must Make ~2.5" Hole In Poured Concrete Foundation Wall

    I'm going to look around a little more.
  23. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    I found this Husky at another place. It's way lighter. They only have a 2.5" bit though. The OD of the 2" pipe is supposedly 2.375" (have to measure).
    [​IMG]
  24. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    The other branch of this place has the Husky with a 3" core bit. That's the way I'll go.
  25. loadstarken

    loadstarken Member

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    When I rerouted my water main I rented a Hilti hammer drill and a 4 inch core bit from Home Depot and it went thru my foundation like a hot knife thru butter. The rental guy said not to use water because it would just slow the tool down. I did what he said because I wasn't going to buy a broken tool if I got it wet.

    I picked the tool up an hour before they closed and drove home 15 minutes then drilled the hole and drove back 15 minutes to Home Depot and still had time to buy a 4 inch PVC pipe.

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