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  1. Freakingstang

    Freakingstang Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Messages:
    262
    Loc:
    Berlin Center, Ohio
    Awesome... That's what I wanted to hear. It's a 2700 sq ft house and the upstairs is always freezing... I'm used to old stoves and wood furnaces, the insert is new to me. Any pointers?

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  2. Freakingstang

    Freakingstang Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Messages:
    262
    Loc:
    Berlin Center, Ohio
    I haven't figure out how to multiquote on this board yet.. That is mighty generous of you. I was trying to get out to Mike's last weekend, but the weather broke and couldn't get back into his honey hole. I have about a cord and a half of slab wood that's good to go, but everything else is green. I'm pretty sure that slab wood is going to go fast....
  3. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    I'm dead serious. Come out Sat or Sun. I have plenty (will show you when you arrive).

    A little bull chittin will suffice for payment. I have some Slab I burn during the weekends when I am home. But, no replacement for good sized splits of Hardwood :)

    (Im of a younger generation, likely much younger than you.FYI. Boog will tell ya :))
  4. Freakingstang

    Freakingstang Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Messages:
    262
    Loc:
    Berlin Center, Ohio
    Well if you insist, I might take you up on that, but you're going to end up with a ported 036....as long as you can let it out of your possession for a few days......
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,581
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA

    My buddy has a Freedom. It's a nice stove and a good heater, for up to about 2000 sq ft. 2700 sq ft is going to be pushing it, but it certainly will help.
  6. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    I have a messed up Hamstring (this messes up a lot of different things in your leg) currently, so I wont be much help loading. :(
    I have an 11 yr old that is pretty good though (if he is home and not at a buddies house)

    As for the saw, I would gladly :)
  7. TradEddie

    TradEddie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    754
    Loc:
    SE PA
    As already said a million times, dry wood is key. I have oak and hickory that I was able to burn in my old slammer in October of 2011 that is still barely dry enough to burn in the new insert, almost 2 years c/s/s. My house is 2400sqft if you include the finished basement, and although we haven't had anything colder that 20s at night yet, my biggest problem is keeping the stove room below 80. Distributing that hot air around seems key for any woodstove, use the search function here for lots of good tips which usually boil down to blow cold air at the stove room and let the hot air take care if itself. One counter-intuitive tip I've noticed is that cracking a window in the stove room doesn't just cool that room to a comfortable level, the increased draft brings warm air upstairs.
    If you have the bypass damper tool, grind about 1/4" off the tab, or you'll very quickly scratch that nice new coating.
    Get a good stovetop thermometer. Get the heat up quick and shut the air down as far as you can. Anything over 400 works well, as the thermometer passes about 380, I can see the switch in the smoke from the chimney as secondaries kick in.
    I've tried blower on low, medium low and off, none seem to change the overall heat output, but using the blower moves the heat away from the stove better, the surround brickwork is much warmer with the blower off. Unless I was overfiring or something, any more than half speed is too loud.
    I've been loading e/w to keep the temperatures down, also because most of my seasoned wood was sized for my slammer, although this usually means the log at the back needs to be dragged forward after a few hours. Loading N/S seems to burn faster and hotter, but more completely all the way to the back, so burns longer without any attention. I've comfortably beaten manufacturer's 12 hour burn claim, and I haven't tried hard.
    Lastly, I put in a block off plate, not to keep the stove heat inside the house, but to reduce the huge downdraft of cold air around the liner when the stove is off (5+ days a week for me).

    Enjoy

    TE
  8. Hickorynut

    Hickorynut Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    225
    Loc:
    western ky.
    TradEddie, I am absolutely not getting the results you are. I get a maximum of 4 to 5 hour burn times with the average being 3 hours. It does not put out as much heat as the country flame slammer of before and I get much dirty glass. I have a interior river rock chimney with a insulated liner with no block off plate. There is a plate up at the top of the chimney were the cap is though. I have a cathedral ceiling that goes into a 1/2 story upstairs so the upstairs is way hotter than the downstairs so maybe that is the whole problem. Overall, I am okay with it but I sure can't sing the praises most people seem to here.
  9. TradEddie

    TradEddie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    754
    Loc:
    SE PA
    I haven't seen a definition of burn time but, last weekend I reloaded at 7:30pm with one split of cherry in the middle and the rest was oak or hickory, the firebox wasn't even filled but I had taken so long to choose the right splits that it was taking off already so I had to close the door. Did that take off, wow? I had the air shut down fully within a few minutes and the needle hit 700, obviously I had the blower on at that stage. I turned the blower off going to bed and woke up at 8:30am to 75F in the stove room, stovetop below 200 but too hot to touch and glowing coals enough to relight by loading on some cherry and cracking the door for 5 minutes. That oak and hickory is barely dry enough to burn well.

    I'll get 4+ hrs burn time (reload when temps about 300) with two splits of cherry, probably 1/3 of the firebox. Are you sure that wood is seasoned, dirty glass is a very suspicious sign? Do you have a stovetop thermometer? How do you start up, using lots of kindling or a good firestarter to get the temp up to 400 as fast as possible is important, building slowly burns out the wood too soon. Having the air open too much also works against you, it cools the stove more than it feeds the fire. Apologies if you've been doing everything right but many newcomers here aren't.

    TE
    Hickorynut likes this.
  10. Freakingstang

    Freakingstang Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Messages:
    262
    Loc:
    Berlin Center, Ohio
    Thanks for the tips. I picked up two 10" box fans . I'm going to have one by the stove and another at the top of the "doorway" of the 24x22 room that the insert is in to push the hot air to the rest of the house. The huge room was an add on 5-8 years ago. I figure with my celiing fans, and hopefully mostly just the box fans pointed in the right directions, I'll get some decent arflow. The room is huge... that's a 70" Tv in the center... the back, where the picture was taken from is a huge 12-13' opening into the rest of the house. a fan at that opening up top, should help move some air to the rest of the house, at least I hope...

    b6969f1d.jpg
    DexterDay likes this.
  11. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    Wow Stang. Nice Room/Crib.. :)
  12. Freakingstang

    Freakingstang Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Messages:
    262
    Loc:
    Berlin Center, Ohio
    Oh, that picture was from the first week moving in.. it was a mess.. I've gotten new furniture (my own self bought xmas present!), but only picture I had to describe room size/layout.

    That TV, was one used at this last years US OPEN golf championship for all of four days, Sharp quatros 70" Lcd backlit LED. I got it for about 1/3 the price of new....., that was my perdiem money for being gone three months while my house was closing and the only way i could afford a TV of that size... everyone i worked with laughed because they thought i was getting a dump for the money I paid for this place and wondered if i was going to sleep on it... the room is 22' wideby 24 deep off the house. it really is huge and needed a huge TV to make it "livable" without sitting three feet in front of the TV. The big living room is on the NW corner of the house, so when the WEM was munching (far NW corner), the master bedroom on the SE side upstairs was a good 14-15 degrees cooler than the downstairs. when the fireplace was not going it was only 7-8 degrees cooler. The house was builtin 48, but added on to three different times over the years. So, over time i'll go through everything and reinsulate and make everything top notch. The kitchen was all brand new Kraft Maid freshly done, along with the new master bed and bath upstairs. Anyways, sorry to ramble, kinda proud of my little piece of the american dream-finally. Will be even better once the iron is up and running. Besides, i have to justify my chainsaw collection.....
  13. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    I just bought the 65" Sharp Aquos Quattron backlit 240htz ED 3D Smart TV. Compared to my 50" Vizio LCD 60Htz HDTV, thats only about 6 yrs old? The picture on the Sharp is AMAZING.

    The difference in technology over 6 yrs is amazing...

    The 70" is what i wanted, but Wifey said it was to BIG for the wall it was going on :( Happy Wife = Happy Life

    Took the saved money and bought another 036 Pro ;)
  14. TradEddie

    TradEddie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    754
    Loc:
    SE PA
    Since you have a blower, I wouldn't worry about a fan close to the stove, put it on the floor just outside that room, blowing in.

    TE
  15. Freakingstang

    Freakingstang Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Messages:
    262
    Loc:
    Berlin Center, Ohio
    blowing in towards the stove, or blowing out heat towards the rest of the house? my thinking is that heat rises, a 10" fan in the top of that big opening would suck alot of that hot, high air out of the room?!
  16. Freakingstang

    Freakingstang Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Messages:
    262
    Loc:
    Berlin Center, Ohio
    I work a bunch of those big golf tournaments.. i work for a rental company and we supply power and hvac to big events. I'll be in New orleans the 23rd for a couple weeks for the super bowl....think about that when you are watching the game. i'm one of the few (6-7) that is our job to make sure the generators running the broadcast compound don't crap the bed.

    Anywho, I worked the US open at oakmont in 2007 and bought a 50" LG plasma. top of the line at the time.. my price was 1550 and that Tv sold for almost 4K then...
    so in 2011 I bought that 70" smarter than the guy using it mega quality tv for 1850, best buy was selling them for 4799 at that time...that tv is now, like 800 bucks new right? lol and yes, that picture quality is amazing. it makes my LG look like a black and white tube TV...
    DexterDay likes this.
  17. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    Not really... Heat does rise, but cold air moves eaiser and is more dense. So blowing cold air towards the stove, will be replaced by warm air.

    Any air moved must be replaced? Right? Your just helping the convective loop of the house. Take some incense and walk through the house. Your may find that the air moves faster up top, or down low in certain areas. Add fans and help the natural loop you have already.

    But the cold to warm is true. It works. Im a firm believer.
  18. TradEddie

    TradEddie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    754
    Loc:
    SE PA
    A fan up top blowing out should work well, but since you said you have another fan, put that outside the room, blowing in. The combination should maintain a nice convection circuit. There is not much to be gained from having a fan within in the room, might even make things worse by disrupting the convection.
    TE

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