My Waterford Stanley Wood Cook Stove

oldmilwaukee Posted By oldmilwaukee, Dec 10, 2008 at 7:58 PM

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  1. oldmilwaukee

    oldmilwaukee
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    Dec 10, 2008
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    Hi, this is my first post here. I hope the picture works. I've been lurking around the boiler room mostly, learning what I can. I took this picture today of my Waterford Stanley. We found all of the stones in this picture (including the flagstones on the floor) here on our farm. If anyone is interested, I will post a picture of the Rumford we built - it's on the other side of this stone structure. Thanks for the site.
     

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  2. InTheRockies

    InTheRockies
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    Aug 15, 2008
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    Welcome! The stove is a beauty and the room, well you did a wonderful job. Please post a photo of the fireplace on the other side. You have a lovely (and warm) home.
     
  3. btj1031

    btj1031
    Feeling the Heat

    Feb 11, 2008
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    Downright stunning! My wife and I visited Kentuckey last year (horse country) and fell in love. Not surprised you've got that beautiful stone around the yard. Nice job.
     
  4. geardoc

    geardoc
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    Oct 30, 2008
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    Wow! Thats awesome. Lets see more pictures.
     
  5. pen

    pen
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    I am ooooozing with jealousy.

    That is absolutely perfect. Well done doesn't describe.

    pen
     
  6. Prada

    Prada
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    Nov 8, 2008
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    WOWZERS! That is just awesome! Heck, I want to see pictures of your whole farm! lol
    Oh and Welcome to the Forum. That is just beautiful to say the least.
     
  7. oldmilwaukee

    oldmilwaukee
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    Dec 10, 2008
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    Thanks for the "warm" welcomes and complements. Here are some pics of the construction phase. It took us 3 months (me, with some occasional help from a real stone mason) to build the first 9 feet - working on it about 70% of my daylight hours. After the first 9 feet, we switched to cinderblocks and stucco and things went a lot quicker. If I had relaxed the tolerances on the drystack gaps, or if my "flat" stones didn't have so many bumps and dips, it would have gone a lot quicker. I will post some shots of the finished Rumford in a different thread.
     

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  8. smokinj

    smokinj
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    Aug 11, 2008
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    What a nice prodject!Wow well done!
     
  9. BucksCoBernie

    BucksCoBernie
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    Oct 8, 2008
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    Awesome Blog!! Your house is amazing!
     
  10. Corie

    Corie
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  11. bfunk13

    bfunk13
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    Absolutely beautiful!
    Congratulations.
     
  12. raybonz

    raybonz
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    Feb 5, 2008
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    Your whole house is amazing!! Checked out some of your blog and looked at some of the work and it's absolutely impressive... Oh and welcome to the forum too!

    Ray
     
  13. sweetheat

    sweetheat
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    Mar 7, 2008
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    labor without art is brutality! nice job, you will love your stanley more each day, my stanley heats my whole house and cooks my food too. 26 years a dedicated stanley owner. best biscuits in Maine. nice square rule frame! did you do that also? I've been framing as long as I've owned my stanley. I completely re-built it 2 years back. I took it down to the platform and did refractory cement and reassembled it. like a new stove, the only problems I've had were the plates and grates burned out and needed to be replaced. I've gone through 2 grates and 1 set of fire plates. burn it hot and don't shut it up so quick, the drier the wood the hotter the fire. keep your burns small if you need to cook something. works real good for cookin and heatin, just watch your spin wheel and your food. If it burns on, it is self cleaning with a hotter fire. wet wood will make a mess of it, creosote dingle-berrys around your oven. clean it twice a winter and before each heating season. How will you ever stand the heat in that closet. you will be opening all the windows and doors. that's how I do it if it gets to warm next to the stanley. Oh! try some french fries! the best. you have a beautiful home, a labor of love! sweetheat :lol:
     
  14. oldmilwaukee

    oldmilwaukee
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    Dec 10, 2008
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    sweetheat,

    glad to hear you like your stanley so much. yes, we are still getting used to how to run ours. thanks for the tips. amazing how little wood it takes to cook a meal. ours does not give off as much heat as I would have thought - the back and sides are insulated. dingle-berries - doesn't sound good - I will stick to dry wood. amazing that you've gone through 2 grates and a set of fire plates - these things look like they will last forever - but I guess you use yours a lot.

    I framed the house myself - well with some help - right here on the farm. trees never left the farm. cut them with my woodmizer, drew the timbers in autocad, raised it with a 1974 Rough Terrain Grove. Apart from a one week course in TN, I didn't really know what I was doing, but I learned as I went along. Still lots of finish work left to do on the inside (and outside!), but we are "dried in".

    BTW, I just received delivery of my Tarm solo 40. Lots of plumbing to do before I get that up and going. Can't wait to get some real heat in this house!

    I am really enjoying this forum.
     
  15. sweetheat

    sweetheat
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    Mar 7, 2008
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    You kind of sound like me 25 years ago. I'd been in construction and built enough so nothing intimidated me. I too had never built a timber frame. But I sure did learn fast. My Mom and Dad thought I was nuts. Especially with money concerned. I did my best and another saw my efforts and asked me to build him one also. I've been building them 25 years now. with a 16 man timber frame crew. If you want more heat from the Stanley remove some or all of the mineral wool insulation. What didi you use for timbers? I've used autocad, but I like the google sketch-up pro we use in our shop. It's a good feeling having a dry roof above your head. It's taken me 25 years to finish my house. You will enjoy the Tarm 40 a most efficient machine. Will you be using open or pressurized water storage with your boiler? What an easy way to heat. sweetheat :lol:
     
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