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Name on a list for Lopi stove

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by davec1951, Aug 30, 2008.

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  1. davec1951

    davec1951 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2008
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    Loc:
    south of Boston
    Hi I've decided to put my name on a list for a Lopi insert. Here is my question. I have approximately 1600-1700 sf to heat gambrel cape. Lopi has 2 stoves Yankee Bay rated to heat 2250sf and Pioneer Bay rated to heat 1600sf. Which does anyone think would work the best. Would the pioneer be working to hard and pushing it on high all the time or would the Yankee be overkill and heating to much and wasting pellets especially in early and late winter when temps are not to bad. Price difference is a little under $500 dollars. Which isn't a huge deal. Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thank you

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
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    I'd get the larger stove. It isn't grossly oversized and will likely mean that you can run it on medium speed during a lot of the winter which will be quieter. Also, you'll really appreciate the larger hopper capacity.
  3. davec1951

    davec1951 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2008
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    Loc:
    south of Boston
    Thanks. Thats what I was thinking but wanted to get other opinions. I was also told by the dealer that I only needed a vent kit that only went a partial way up the chimney as opposed to going all the way to the top as long as it was clay lined which it is. Does that make any sense. I thought and was told you are supposed to line the whole chimney.
  4. imacman

    imacman Guest

    I'd go onto the Travis website and see if you can download a copy of the owners manual. It should have diagrams of all the venting possibilities....go by what is shown there.

    It may be an insurance/building code issue down the road if you ever had a fire (hopefully that never happens, but....). My local town asked for a copy of the page in the owners manual showing the venting option I was going to use before they would issue a building permit.
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The fellow may be just trying to be competitive in his price. I ran ours all the way up. You'll be going through several tons of pellets. That will create a lot of flyash. With a stub in the chimney, it's going to accumulate over the years and will be very messy if the pipe needs to be pulled. If the stub is too short, the flyash will eventually clog the pipe. There is also a likelihood of cold air decending down the chimney into the house unless a proper block off plate is installed.

    The stub will work, it's your choice. If you do chose this method be sure to take it at least 6 feet above the damper shelf and install a proper block off plate to seal off the damper area.
  6. davec1951

    davec1951 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2008
    Messages:
    7
    Loc:
    south of Boston
    Thanks for the info. I talked with him again and he said there is less fallback of the fly ash back down the vent pipe and into the exhaust tee which means less buildup and cleaning of the ash. They do seal the flue and run the vent 5-6 feet above into the chimney liner.
    Thanks again
    this forum is great
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