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Need a chainsaw? Clueless.

Post in 'The Gear' started by jkranes, May 13, 2013.

  1. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I would have but its under a cord and already into splits...:)

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  2. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    You mean something like this? ;) You're on the right track with the sawbuck idea, especially if you have a lot of trimming to do at once. If you only needed to trim a few splits on occasion, I'd be on board with the miter saw idea.

    See above link, note that I was running a 20" bar on that saw and that sawbuck is roughly 16" wide. So you would need a big electric saw (they make them, but they are $$) or you'd have to narrow the rack considerably.

    Electric chainsaws, glasses/goggles, gloves, and boots should be fine. Chaps are a must for gas-powered saws but they will NOT stop an electric. Too much torque from the electrics, even small ones. Also an electric will usually stop the chain immediately after you release the trigger so spin-down contact (the #1 way to injure yourself with a gas saw) risk is minimal.

    If you already have a gas-powered trimmer, blower, etc., adding a small gas-powered saw probably won't be a problem. You never know, all of a sudden you might find the idea of buying your wood replusive and start scrounging up your own. ;)
  3. SIERRADMAX

    SIERRADMAX Feeling the Heat

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  4. BrianK

    BrianK Guest

    This came in today's Harbor Freight email:
    image.jpg
    image.jpg

    I don't know anything about this unit other than what was in the ad.
  5. jkranes

    jkranes Member

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    I ordered an Earthwise 16" electric saw ($70). We'll see how it goes from here. At some point I may also pick up a mitre saw as well; every so often I have a project where I wish I had one.
  6. jkranes

    jkranes Member

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    Success!

    Attached Files:

    bodhran, Joful, HDRock and 2 others like this.
  7. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Suburban infrequent use = electric chainsaw. I used one of these as a kid, under similar circumstances. No engine / fuel mix / carb problems to worry about.

    Edit: just read rest of thread, and learned the OP already went that way! Good move. Pick up a spare chain, and you're all set to work. If buying PPE, consider chaps your first move. Helmets are nice, but there are far more leg contact injuries than head contact injuries.
  8. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee Minister of Fire

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    Congratulations. I'm always in favor of electric rather than gas equipment whenever practical. Both for pragmatic and idealistic reasons.
  9. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Just remember that chaps are not near as effective with an electric saw.
  10. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Interesting. Why? I've not tested the effectiveness of my chaps with either, but the one electric I keep as a loaner saw (old Craftsman) has a clutch that slips perhaps more easily than any of my gas saws.
  11. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Several discussions over the years and most chaps come with a warning about electric saws. Most don't have a clutch and have a ton of torque. Gas saws have more speed but electric more torque. And the torque curve is flat right down to when it stops.
  12. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Torque. It takes a LOT more to stop an electric saw compared to a gas engine of equivalent HP output.
    TreePointer likes this.
  13. bodhran

    bodhran Member

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    I purchased an Earthwise 16" saw this week after my other electric saw died. I find them easier for junking up the wood and quieter for the neighbours. Being on a 50' x 100' lot in town with 16 cord of wood in the backyard draws enough attention as it is.:)
    clemsonfor and Joful like this.
  14. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee Minister of Fire

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    Wow! That's a lot of wood on a small piece of property. You'll need to get creative with your stacking.

    Firewood5.jpg
    firewood14.jpg Firewood3.jpg
    jaychino415 likes this.
  15. pyroholic

    pyroholic Member

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    I never get tired off seeing that last pic, of the fallen tree wood stack. Look closely and the detail is amazing. Truly art, but how would you bring yourself to take it apart and burn it.
  16. bodhran

    bodhran Member

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  17. bodhran

    bodhran Member

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    I tried the chop saw idea last year. Turned out badly for the chop saw and narrow miss for my hand!!!
  18. gmule

    gmule Feeling the Heat

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    I have cut many cords of 2"-4" limbs and small tree trunks with my chop saw. It is fast and quiet
    smokinj and Thistle like this.
  19. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    Re cutting wood is not particularly safe and is no way for a novice to learn, IMO, so. . .

    1) Start by putting an ad in CL for the over-length wood and get as much of your $$ as possible

    2) Consider installing a pellet stove in place of your current insert
  20. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    That's what I use to reduce all those small poles & branches etc. to usuable lengths.Normally 1-2 p/u loads per year.Delta 10" cast iron miter saw, had it almost 25 yrs old now.40 tooth carbide tipped blade w/ 1/8" kerf,cuts faster than any chainsaw.
  21. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    I disagree. I learned chainsaw use as a grade-schooler, by cutting to finished length the double- and triple-length rounds dad brought home from the woods. We had a sawbuck for the purpose, and I think it was some of the safer cutting I've ever done. Perhaps, if cutting loose splits on the ground, you're right... but in a rack or a sawbuck, I think it can be a plenty safe way to learn.
  22. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    Yeah. . . with a sawbuck I agree, but I didn't get a sawbuck vibe from the OP. In any case, seems like a lot of work/money for very little wood.
  23. Ram 1500 with an axe...

    Ram 1500 with an axe... Minister of Fire

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    What a great idea, will it go through red oak with ease?
  24. gmule

    gmule Feeling the Heat

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    I can knock out a truck load of small logs in about an hour. I put the saw on my tailgate and pull logs from the bed of the truck to the saw. I position the saw in a way that I can use tailgate support chain as my fence so that I can get consistent lengths of the logs. I have some logs in the truck ready to go so I can snap a picture and post how I do it. I use a 12" dewalt saw that will let me cut up to a 5" diameter log.
  25. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    The absolute fastest way to trim splits and cut poles to length is an H-Frame sawbuck. I just loaded mine up last week with some 4-6ft poles for the first time. Within 2-3 minutes of it being loaded, I had dozens of rounds cut to length, ready to stack or split.

    I have a video of me trimming splits with it. It is much faster than even a chop saw to process those in batches as well.

    gmule and smokinj like this.

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