Need help figuring out how to lower pipe down to fireplace

missouri43 Posted By missouri43, Feb 5, 2013 at 6:43 PM

  1. missouri43

    missouri43
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    Dec 14, 2007
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    Hello, I have a chase that runs up my wall for my stove pipe around 25 feet. My problem is how can I safely get my pipe run down to my stove ( zero clearance fireplace)? The chase is very tight for me to get into and find it hard to work in. Is there a way to lower the pipe down from the top of the chase, one section at a time, and not harm the pipe? The pipe is 8" double wall 3' lengths of supervent. By the time I get several sections together it will weigh quiet a bit.
    Any help appreciated.
     
  2. begreen

    begreen
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    I think we need the bigger picture here. Is the zc fireplace still installed? Is this a wood burning zc fireplace? If so, you don't need any class A, you need a stainless liner to drop down the existing chimney.
     
  3. missouri43

    missouri43
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    Dec 14, 2007
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    I'll try and take some pictures and get posted. What I'm installing is a buckmaster wood burning zero clearance fireplace. It called for the heavy duty pipe.
     
  4. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver
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    Well,I will just say this. About the chase. I didn't drop my pipe down. I pushed it though 35'. It worked and is still working. It was a heavy push but we did it.
     
  5. begreen

    begreen
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    OK, thanks for the clarification. This is a fireplace install not a stove. I changed the title to reflect this.

    Is the chase one or two story? If two story it needs a firestop between floors. That may require cutting an access port. If so, then this could help with guiding the pipe.

    What was this chase for originally?
     
  6. missouri43

    missouri43
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  7. missouri43

    missouri43
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    Sorry in being so long in replying. Here is a picture of what I'm trying to do. Hope it helps answer some questions. I need to go up probably 15 or more feet from this point and even though I have the ladder part of the way up I just can't get up there very easily because it is so tight. Is there a way of lowering the pipe down without damaging it? I haven't done this before and just wanted to do it right.
    Thanks for any help.
     
  8. Jon1270

    Jon1270
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    I used an insulated double-wall rigid liner (i.e. not a class A chimney), which is probably lighter than yours but generally similar. I dropped all 25' of it down from the top, and did it without a helper. My liner is designed to be supported from the top of the chimney, its weight hanging from a friction clamp. I slid the pipe sections through that clamp, loosening and tightening it to control the descent and to stop it so I could rivet on new sections of pipe. I think you could do something similar, but you might have to improvise the clamp out of something like 2x4s and threaded rod.

    There are bumps and fasteners at the joints between sections, where it's necessary to open the clamp a lot to get past them. Not wanting to risk dropping the liner, I linked together a couple of large, heavy-duty hose clamps (big box store plumbing section) and tightened them onto the liner a few inches above each joint. The screws on the hose clamps stuck out further than any of the protrusions on the liner so that, when the joint arrived at the main clamp controlling the decent, I could open the main clamp far enough to get past the obstructions, and the hose clamp would stop the fall when it hit the main clamp. (Hoping that's clearer than mud).
     
  9. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames
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    Nov 26, 2012
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    You will have to get in the chase one way or other to install the wall brackets. I see you have at least one installed now, I think generally they are required a maximum of 8' apart. Unless the chase gets smaller higher up, it seems like a smaller guy can fit inside and install the pipe.
     
  10. CT-Mike

    CT-Mike
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    Mar 22, 2008
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    When I installed my liner from the top down, I took one end of a length of rope and tied to the satellite dish base. Then ran the free end through a section of liner, and tied it off loosely. Add another section of rigid liner, screw them together, let out a little rope to lower it into the chimney, add another section, tie it off, and lather, rinse, repeat. Worked very well.
     

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