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Need help making a free standing heat shield

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by n6crv, Oct 19, 2007.

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  1. n6crv

    n6crv Feeling the Heat

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    Hello, I need to make a heat shield for the side of the stove. I have a couch that I can only get 29" away from the side of the stove. I really can't move it any farther away as it is already blocking 1/2 of the door to my computer room. I would like the shield to be free standing that way in the summer I can take it to the basement. I have a piece of metal siding 3'X3' that I would like to use. My trouble is what can I make the frame out of? Can I just make the frame out of say 2x2 wood and mount the steel to it? If that would work do I need to space the metal away from the frame? I was thinking of the wood frame as I can round the corners so you don't have to worry about getting poked. I was thinking about painting the metal with black stove paint. Thanks for any thoughts.
    Don

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  2. MrKenmore

    MrKenmore New Member

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  3. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    What about a short freestanding brick wall - tied into the floor of course...
  4. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    What does the stove require for clearances between it and the couch? (as in clearance to a non-combustible wall, I know the couch requires 36" as do all non-wall combustibles) If there is enough room, I'd build the frame out of wood as you suggested, and fasten the sheet metal to it, no real need for spacers, but making sure that whatever you used for legs held the sheet up off the floor by a couple inches. Put it with the sheet metal facing the stove, at least the minimum clearance distance away. Should function as a "wall" and what's on the other side shouldn't count.

    I would suggest not painting it black however, as a light color would be better at reflecting heat instead of absorbing it.

    Gooserider
  5. n6crv

    n6crv Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks for the help. I think I will pass on the brick wall but will make one out of wood and sheet metal. Now just need some weather that lets us try it.
    Don
  6. Cath

    Cath Feeling the Heat

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    Could you clarify how the sheet metal will be attached to the wood frame? If the wood literally "frames" the sheet metal then you may actually be putting a combustible closer to the stove. Even if if the sheet metal will be "shielding" the frame as well as the couch it may be a good idea to try to "space the metal away from the frame" so the sheet metal does not heat the wood up.

    If you had the right materials I think the metal end table someone else suggested would work.

    Or, how about hanging the sheet metal from the ceiling using two chains?
    ~Cath
  7. n6crv

    n6crv Feeling the Heat

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    Hello Cath, well I got it together this morning. What I ended up doing was using a old metal shelfing unit that I had. It had 3 shelfs that were made to look like wood and metal legs. The kind that works good for books. Well anyway I took it apart and took 2 of the shelfs and screwed them together, using the lips they have on the edge. I then screwed them to a 1x10 piece of wood on the bottom for support. The wood base is below the hearth so it should not get very hot if at all. The shield sets 22" from the stove and 6" from the couch. The stove calls for 19" clearance so I should be fine. Might be able to try it out Wed. as it is suppose to be cool. Will post how it works out.
    Don
  8. eernest4

    eernest4 New Member

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    you can use any type of metal pipe , even sheet metal pipe, even cut up an old steel hollow broom handle to make 3 inch stand offs of the metal heat shield from the frame. Put 1/4 x 20
    bolts ,nuts & lock washers, 4 of each to attach the sheet metal to the wood frame , right thru the center of the pipe standoffs. You need 4 inch length bolts. 3inch 4 the standoff's and I assume 1 inch of wood. Maybe you need 5 or 6 inch bolts, depend on thickness of wood.
    The sheet metal should begin 1 inch off the floor and extend up to 18 inches above the top of the stove & be sure to sheld the wooden feet with an extra piece of sheet metal you could bolt on 2 the main piece., just in case.

    This will be a lot cheaper that buying copper.

    Option #2. buy a piece of steel electrical conduit pipe to cut up for standoffs.
  9. MrGriz

    MrGriz New Member

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    Goose, where are you coming up with 36" clearance to combustibles? Is that a for an unlisted stove?

    I checked the manual for the 13NCP and it looks to me like the side clearance to combustibles is 19" without the heat shield. I'm curious as to where you came up with 36", partly because I'm planning on re-arranging the furniture in the stove room and I want to know if there is an additional clearance required to furniture or if it is just the clearance to combustible listed in the manual.
  10. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    There was considerable discussion of this last burning season in connection with how far you needed to keep your firewood supply from the stove. Forget just who, but I believe it was Elk said NFPA calls for 36" minimum between a stove and combustibles other than walls - such as furniture, firewood holders, etc. Part of this was the idea that while there is a pretty limited set of things to make a wall out of, most of them fairly hard to light, other material was more variable, often with a lower potential ignition point, and more crevices for sparks to land in...

    Gooserider
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