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Need help on type of tree/firewood this is.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by firemarshallbill, Jan 10, 2006.

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  1. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    Dylan - The leaf litter is firemarshals original photo. My split is the second photo. Sorry if the descriptions got confusing.

    Firemarshal - Yes, hedge can get quite big. Most of the wood I am burning this year came from three limbs of one tree. The limbs were about 16-18" big at the base. The trunk was probably 30-36" or more.

    If it is hedge, you are in for a treat. It's the highest BTU/lb wood that I know of...low to mid 30 million per cord, very heavy, and burns great. Although one caution, it will most likely spark A LOT! Not all the time, but every now and then it will just erupt in a shower of sparks. You may have noticed green "hedge balls" on the ground or thorns on some of the branches, but only if it was a female tree.

    Corey

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  2. firemarshallbill

    firemarshallbill New Member

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    It looks like I landed a winner then. Thanks for all your help guys!
  3. ChrisN

    ChrisN Feeling the Heat

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    I hate to throw a damper on things, but why did you discard the original Ash suggestion? the leaf looks like ash, the bark looks like ash, it splits like ash.... and ash is very common in New England. My motto is: if it looks like a duck, walks like a duck and quakes likes a duck... it's probably a duck!

    Chris
  4. firemarshallbill

    firemarshallbill New Member

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    Hey Chris - is ash yellow like that when you initially cut it?
  5. hh3f

    hh3f Member

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  6. PaulGuy

    PaulGuy New Member

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    Westport? Hmmm... Id say that's a very rare species which is actually dangerous to burn. Better send me you're address and I'll drive down there and take it off your hands for you. You know...a public service. ;-)
  7. firemarshallbill

    firemarshallbill New Member

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    Thanks Split this! Good info here.



    Nah, you wouldn't like it here. Its very dangerous. ;) Are you familiar with the area?
  8. ChrisN

    ChrisN Feeling the Heat

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    Bill, I just cut up an Ash Tree trunk. It it was pretty yellow when split, getting yellower toward the middle. It splits very easily. If I get a chance I'll post a picture of a split for comparison, if the thread drags on long enough!
  9. FireJumper

    FireJumper New Member

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    i need to agree...i would say aspen or poplar.
  10. TheFlame

    TheFlame New Member

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    I'll second this. Looks like Mulberry to me.
  11. dflone

    dflone New Member

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    It's not ash, cherry, larch or pine for sure. I cut all those species for a living here in the adirondacks and it looks like none of them. The bark looks alot like a hardwood but the wide growth rings would make it a fast growing and more than likely "soft" hardwood. Low btu output. Though free btu's are free btu's.
  12. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    Well, because I said I would...here is a pic of my hedge (in the red box) versus your log. Sorry I didn't post last night, wife had the camera and wasn't home 'till late. Our logs are different sizes so there is some difference of scale. See what 'ya think.

    Also, a good point was brought up about mulberry and hedge being in the same family and having similar wood color. I believe I was trumped in my 99% certainty by a 99.44% at somepoint in the thread. If I'm mistaken, that is fine...fully to able to admit that! I've been mistaken before...at least I can still claim that I've never been wrong! :)

    So when are 'ya going to send that thing out for DNA testing?!?

    Corey

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  13. firemarshallbill

    firemarshallbill New Member

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    Thanks all. It does look similar to your splitI cozy heat. I have been splitting the pieces for the last couple days. They split relatively easy. My brute force! ;) at this point, i just want to get it done. its alot of work, but better than paying a huge gas bill.
  14. crow

    crow New Member

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    Does the wood have a strong smell?
    I live across the street from woods that are filled with osage orange.
    Occasionally the seedlings pop up in my yard. When you cut them they have a very distinctive sharp smell.
    Not quite citrus , but similar.
    When the tree is fresh cut , the sap is heavy and sticky.

    My dad uses osage orange to make drum beaters (he sings on an inter-tribal american indian drum circle.)The drummers love osage , because once it's dry, and sealed ,you can pound on it with all your might , and it won't break.

    I've always heard it was good for burning. Extremely hot. But I have never burned it.

    A few people have told me that it can burn TOO hot. "nitro". Has anyone burned it regularly .
    What's the story?
  15. damien

    damien Woodlove

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    I've got to agree w/cozy heat. I think that wood is hedge, got some in the stove right now. Love hedge, in moderation mixed with oak.
  16. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    I've been burning straight hedge most of the winter. I have never noticed a strong smell in the green wood, of course, I 've never really put my nose right down to it either. It has a rather mellow smell when burnt that is pretty easily identifyable, but I guess only if you know what it smells like to begin with. It's all over the place here, so you can catch a whiff of smoke and say ahhh, that guy is burning hedge, or oak, or hickory, etc.

    I wouldn't say it really "burns" hotter than any other wood. The flame is still yellow just like any other wood, or even newspaper or a candle for that matter. But with it's high BTU content it does release more energy in the stove which typically results in higher temps for the same volume of wood. I've never really had any trouble with overfiring or excess temps. The sparks are another matter, though! This last load seems to be particularly offensive. Kind of reminds me of the 4th of July fireworks that send out a shower of sparks and about 50% of the sparks end with a little "crackle". Luckily, they are mostly like sparks from a metal grinder, they look pretty spectacular, but don't really do much even if they land on bare skin.

    Corey
  17. crow

    crow New Member

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    That's good to know. There's a ton of it around here . I have been thinking about picking up the fallen branches and dead wood and drying them out for next year. Now I will.
    :cheese:
  18. Riddler

    Riddler New Member

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    My vote goes toward mulberry or osage..I have osage orange and split a piece of it open and i also have mulberry and split a piece of it open. only thing i have noticed different between the two is the bark..the osage has more of a slicker bark and it is orangish in color hope this helps. But in my opinion they are both great to burn.
  19. Riddler

    Riddler New Member

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  20. JBinKC

    JBinKC Feeling the Heat

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    Although I am not familiar with the properties of the wood of the tree per se when looking at the bark at the base of the tree my vote is potentially horsechestnut or a younger ironwood tree before it gets the rectangular plated sheddy looking bark. Definitely not hedgeapple or mulberry when looking at the bark of the tree on page 2
  21. zogboy

    zogboy New Member

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    The only 100% sure way to know the type of wood is to use the leaves to ID the tree.
    If this thread keeps going thoses trees will be in full bloom, then it will be easy.
    My bet is still on the box alder.
  22. zogboy

    zogboy New Member

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    You are correct it is named boxelder a member of the maple family, altho I have always heard the locals around here call them boxalder.

    However I disagree that you can ID a tree by looking at the pics without the leaves on the internet.
    Maybe if you could hold it , smell it , burn it, and check the bark close up you could make the ID.
    But I stand by my statement the only 100% ID is the leaf.
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