1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Need help with my pipe installation!!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by k9daro, Dec 12, 2010.

  1. k9daro

    k9daro New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    southern Connecticut


    Hello Everyone, Im new to the site and I've run into some trouble with my pipe installtion. I have currently installed a HearthStone Homestead Wood Burning Stove into my first floor Ranch home. I ran about 5 feet of single wall black stove pipe from the rear of the stove, straight up through my ceiling and into an addic area of my house. My problem is that once I started to install the class A double wall stainless section from the support box straight up through the back side of my roof I found that the double class A pipe was right smack in the center of my main beam of my roof joice. I need to be at least 8-10 inches away from the center of my beam so I can go through my roof with the pipe. I went to a dealer to purchase two 45 degree offsets in double wall, which they make in a slight 90 degree form, but the stove guy said it might not be code to do such an install but he was not 100 percent sure. Im looking to install a 3 foot section of double wall stainless pipe from where the box meets the black single wall pipe in my attic joice and then attaching both offsets to a 90 degree ontop of the 3 foot section then adding my 4 foot section, which would take me through my roof and installing the collor, which would bring me exactly 2 1/2 to 3 feet over the peek of my roof. Can anybody tell me if this would work and if I would run into a code problem or even a fire hazard situation. I've seen plently of stove installs with 45 degree and 90 degree pipe installs, Please Im looking to get this running up ASAP. Very Cold in CT and Im not paying for any more home heating oil!!

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. DWW68

    DWW68 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2008
    Messages:
    44
    Loc:
    WNY
    "I ran about 5 feet of single wall black stove pipe from the rear of the stove, straight up through my ceiling and into an addic area of my house"


    Single wall pipe can not run through your ceiling. your support box should be attached to the ceiling with your double wall class a above that continueing through the roof. If room allows you can make your offset above your ceiling and below yor roof.
  3. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,345
    Loc:
    Central Kentucky
    I honestly don't totally understand what you are asking, but it seems you want to put 45 or 90 degree class A in your attic..?

    As far as I understand, there are no 45 degree or 90 degree class A CHIMNEY pieces. You will have to use 15 or 30 degree pieces. 45 and 90 are only available for stove pipe.
  4. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Messages:
    842
    Loc:
    North Alabama
    An easier method would be place ceiling support box where Class A chimney can go straight up through roof decking, avoiding joists. Then use stove pipe with offsets, as needed, from stove to ceiling support box. Have you already cut a hole in your ceiling sheetrock?
  5. k9daro

    k9daro New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    southern Connecticut
    I ran my black single walll pipe through a protective heat shield box, that attaches to my joices in my attack. the double wall Class pipe attached to the top of this support. My question is can you run a 90 degree piece, which I know they sell because I almost purchased it tonight. The pieces are double wall Class made by Hart & Cooley Company. The 45 degree pieces are very expensive, around $215.00 each. When put together they will give me a 90 degree, which I need for the clearing my main roof joice. Can I do this, without any problems in terms of fires, or coding problems. my main concern is fires. The guy at the store was not 100 percent sure, thats why im holding out in the 45 degree pieces. Has anyone done a install like this and will it work and be safe?
  6. k9daro

    k9daro New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    southern Connecticut
    Yes, I have already cut a hole in my sheet rock and my black pipe is all installed and secured through my attic 2 by 8 wood joices. Im stuck with this setup because my stove is already placed on the 48 by 48 hearth and my clearance from my stove and pipe to the walls are perfect this way and I can not move the stove
  7. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Messages:
    842
    Loc:
    North Alabama
    I dunno if 45 deg offset Class A chimney in an attic is within code. Your local code enforcers and/or insurance co have final answer. Maybe somebody will chime in. What bothers me about it is weight - Class A is dang heavy. The ceiling support box is designed to handle this weight in a VERTICAL dimension. Here, you're adding lateral weight/force. There may be heavy duty, approved bracing that can be added to roof trusses and remain safe and in code.
    What are your ceiling joists - 16" OC? What I'd do here is pull CSB, repair sheetrock, move CSB over to where Class A will be straight up, get 2 stove pipe elbows and not pay $430 for 2 Class A elbows.
  8. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,345
    Loc:
    Central Kentucky
    From the catalog for the all fuel chimney from Hart and Cooley:

    Model TLC chimneys are limited to offsets not
    exceeding 30°. Combining offsets for greater
    angle is not permitted. The 45° elbows may
    be used ONLY with oil or gas appliances.

    • One pair of (two) elbows may be used for
    interior installation only.
    • Never install an elbow in a joist area. Chimney
    sections must pass vertically through framed
    joist areas.
    • Locking Bands must be used at all chimney
    joints.
    • Each elbow resupport will support 15 feet of
    chimney.
    • The maximum length of chimney allowed
    between elbows is 6 feet.
    A
    B

    For the money involved, it would be a whole lot cheaper and easier (and to code) to move the support box for a straight up run of chimney, and do whatever angles you need to do with the (much cheaper) black stove pipe.
  9. Renovation

    Renovation New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,087
    Loc:
    SW MI near Saugatuck
    +1 Agreed on all points. Thanks DD, I was hoping someone else would take the trouble to post this. I saw the same info and reached the same conclusion--move the support box.

    Welcome to the world of home renovation, and the joys and spankings it provides. It has taught me time and time again the need for thorough planning and checking before cutting, as I have painted myself into many similar corners, and still do. It sucks, but moving the support box is the best choice now.

Share This Page