1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Need some help with an old Suburban CoalMaster

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by mashman, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. mashman

    mashman New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    Eastern MA
    I was given an old Suburban CoalMaster Coal/Wood burning stove. I am a complete newb with no knowledge of wood stoves. I'm going to have a chimney sweep company come out and clean the flue and do the installation (I'm in Eastern Mass),
    Does anybody happen to have the operating instructions for this thing? Or know where I can get them? It's probably pretty straightforward but I want to make sure I do everything safely and correctly because like I said I've never even used a wood stove. I'm going to have this stove in my basement to keep the basement warm and (hopefully) add a little bit or warmth upstairs as well.

    I have a neighbor who seems to be pretty knowledgeable about wood stoves so I'll ask him for some tips on getting it started etc...but figured I'd ask you guys as well for some tips and for some way to get a manual.

    I've attached a pic of the stove (not my actual stove but a pic I found of somebody elses CoalMaster on CraigsList).

    Thanks for any help at all. Any tips on operating the stove or anything else related would be great too.

    Attached Files:

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,892
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    It is not the same stove, but you might want to look at the US Stove B2350 manual for some general burning directions. It's a wood/coal burning cabinet circulator.

    https://www.usstove.com/index.php?route=cms/article&path=6&article_id=11

    As a general rule, for burning wood, one uses the top air supply and closes off the bottom intake that supplies air under the grates, except for starting the fire when both may be opened.
  3. Stephen in SoKY

    Stephen in SoKY Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    Messages:
    333
    Loc:
    Southern Kentucky
    Circulators are blissfully easy to run. With decent fuel they will provide meaningful heat for hours. You will absolutely need a MPD. I recomend placing it about 10" out the back with the handle facing the feed door. In this position you can have seat on a low stool, open the damper and load her up. I'd also make certain the gaskets in the feed and ash door are in very good condition. Most circs I've used or worked on take 3/4 inch rope gasket which is seldom an in stock item at Ace/TSC/Menards type places. Dedicated stove shops may have it or its available online. Must the ash door be open to shake the grates? In most circs this is the case. The US Stove manual BG listed will get you started. If you have any questions feel free to post, lots of us have used circs and will be glad to help.
  4. mashman

    mashman New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    Eastern MA
    Thanks for the replies, that stove looks very similar to the CoalMaster so that manual should be a great start. The rope gasket on the door looks to be in pretty good shape (according to my neighbor), and I will speak to my installer about the MPD.
    Thanks again!
  5. mashman

    mashman New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    Eastern MA
    Ok, dumb question. Looking at the stove it doesn't seem to have any dampers, just the thermostat, is that why I need the MPD?
    When I light is it just: Keep ash door closed, turn thermostat to high, open feeder door load kindling wood and get fire going, then close feeder..then adjust thermostat?
    Seems that's all there is to it?
  6. Stephen in SoKY

    Stephen in SoKY Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    Messages:
    333
    Loc:
    Southern Kentucky
    You'll need the MPD to slow the stove if it gets carried away and to hold your heat in the stove rather than sending it up the chimney. Without a MPD, when the bimetal calls for heat and opens, your stove will have a tendency to get ripping pretty good, with extra heat comes extra draft, and without the MPD it just goes up the chimney. With an MPD set to wherever you learn it needs to be set your heat will remain within the stove. Personally I never adjust my bi-metal once I have it set to the room temp I want. I light and char my reloads with the ash pan door. As long as you NEVER leave the stove with the ash pan door ajar it works great despite what you'll often hear.

    To light I always place a split against the back side of the firebox effectively reducing its size and build my fire on the grates between the split and the front of the stove. You may well find another way, but that saves paper and kindling while establishing a good fire.

    Assuming your bi-metal is in good shape it will hold temp within a couple degrees of where you set it.

Share This Page