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  1. Sandycane

    Sandycane New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    32
    Loc:
    Tennessee
    The first call I made was to the insurance co. The woman said no problem as long as the stove wasn't my 'main source of heat'. Nothing was said about an inspection. Go figure. :-/

    I think I am suffering from TMI (too much information) at the moment and I need to digest what's been said so far. Thanks for the links but coal is out of the question...so are pellets, corn, cow patties and other 'stuff'. It's wood or nothing because wood can be gathered for free, if need be.

    Here is a plan of my house. The 'X' in the circle is where I want to put the stove. I have 9' ceilings and a full attic over the front bedroom, the 'living room', 'dining room' and kitchen. The two front rooms are finished, the room over the dining room has a floor and wall insulation and the room over the kitchen has only floor insulation. I have a metal roof. The front of the house faces east.
    Suggestions are welcomed. :coolsmile:

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  2. Sandycane

    Sandycane New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    32
    Loc:
    Tennessee
    Okay...update.
    I had a professional mason look at the wall last night and he said to cut away the sheetrock around the flue opening to expose the brick/masonry behind. Other than that he saw no problem with my set-up.
    The chimney 'inspector' is supposed to come by today to clean out the kitchen chimney. I'll also get his approval on the other chimney.
    Sooo, I think I'm sticking with my previous decision.
    I realize I don't have the 'best' stove and set-up consitions but, for emergency use only', I think it'll do just fine.
    Heck, it was good enough for my grandparents for 50 years, it should be good enough for me on an emergency basis.

    I'll sure hate to get that new chimney dirty, though!
    Thanks for all the advice and if my house should burn down because of this stove, I give you permission to say: I Told You So.
  3. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    14,770
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    If your still around :down:
  4. Sandycane

    Sandycane New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    32
    Loc:
    Tennessee
  5. cigarman

    cigarman New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    knoxville, TN.
    Hey Sandycane......if you do use it, let me know what you think of it. I have also been looking for a wood stove for ONLY light occasional, emergency use....actually the Voelzang HH005 you spoke of. I know that everyone here doesn't have a very good opinion of it, but it's use would be very seldom. And this one would REALLY be in a cinderblock type cabin. Anyway, it's still just a thought for now. Thanks!
  6. erikdhafaB

    erikdhafaB New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    16
    At least get yourself a good carbon monoxide detector for the bedroom...
  7. cigarman

    cigarman New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    knoxville, TN.
    Will do! Thanks FS!
  8. Sandycane

    Sandycane New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    32
    Loc:
    Tennessee
    Hi cigarman!

    I've spoken to a few other 'locals' who said they have used one like this or know someone who has and they said it 'worked' just fine. I think as long as the proper precautions are taken care of, it will work just fine...for an emergency situation.
    If I were to decide to use one on a daily basis, I would upgrade.
    Good luck and let ME know when you fire it up how you like it. I'll do the same....I'm hoping I won't have to use it though 'cause that'll mean I'm in the middle of an emergency situation!
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,768
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Define emergency. The problem with "emergency" situations, is that they are likely to be the most stressful. If the power is out for several days and you're depending on the stove to heat the house while a blizzard is blowing and it's zero outside, you will be riding the stove hard. This is not the place for a cheap patch solution if it's going to be used in a mission critical situation.

    You might want to investigate what the "locals" are using for their emergency situations. Bring a camera and post them here.
  10. polaris

    polaris Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Messages:
    418
    Loc:
    KY.
    I heat our hunting cabin with a boxwood (a twin of the one you pictured) stove and cook on it as well. I go through and use furnace cement on it every couple of years but it has been safe and reliable. The down sides are it eats wood at many times the rate of an epa stove. It is REAL hard to regulate temp and it needs some real big clearances. I would not really want one in my house but if it was all I had and the chimney, pipe, hearth and clearances were acceptable I might consider it(vs. freezing to death). While not the best, for many years, many people heated with this type of stove and most of them lived. It's most definitely not the fill it up and go to work kind of stove. It's kind of like a dog you know bites but hasn't bitten you yet. You keep a fairly close eye on him.
  11. cigarman

    cigarman New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    knoxville, TN.
    Hi all! Most of the folks around here that lose power and all don't have ANY backup at all. They just suffer. The longest we've been without is around 3 days. I have dual propane burners for cooking and spare tank (for use ouside), Coleman stove and lanterns and a fireplace to keep warm. I wanted the stove to be able to do it all, cook, bake and whatever if I needed to. But mostly, and I hope this makes sense, to just experiment with and see what it's like to cook on a wood stove and oven. They've had them on sale around here for less then $300 at times, so the expense is minimal. The stove will NOT be in my main home. So that is my plan. Hope you all were able to follow this, I'm still confused myself!!!! LOL! Later, Ron.
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