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Neutocrete - Work completed, now with pictures 2/2/10

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by Flatbedford, Jan 22, 2010.

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  1. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    I just contacted with Neutocrete (http://www.neutocrete.com/ ) to deal with my dirt floored, uninsulated crawlspace. Has anybody here ever dealt with them. My father has been in home construction and remodeling for 40+ years and recommended them to me. The crawlspace is bitter cold and has been home to many critters over the years. I think that getting it sealed form the outside and made part of the conditioned space will make a huge difference in keeping that end of the house warm. I'll post pics and a review after the job is done in a couple weeks.

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  2. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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  3. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the information, but I do not want to do it myself. I spent a day in there trying to eliminate drafts about 6 years ago. It is a filthy nasty place. I had to either slither in on my back or belly, because there is not enough height for me to roll over in there. I found droppings, food, and remains of animals big and small. I do almost all that needs to be done at my house, but this one I will gladly pay somebody else to do. :lol:
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    That sounds very close to a description of our crawlspace. It was so tight in some areas that my scrawny body would get wedged, belly crawling in there. Rodents were having a field day.

    First thing, make absolutely sure that this is a very dry space with no seepage in any area from gutters, drains etc. Next, make sure the company agrees that there is enough room to work and do a good job (which they may not). They may require some areas to be dug out first. Then, if access is ok after the neutocrete, consider insulating the interior walls, sill plate and sill cavities. This is what I did with our house. The difference is wonderful. Even when it is very cold for us (20 deg.) our crawlspace remains at 60 and floor are comfortable.

    Read the building science article, it's a good one and was my guideline for our crawlspace. Even if they seal the crawlspace floor, there will be some caulking and sill cavity insulation needed to turn this into a conditioned space.

    Keep us posted. I'm curious about the cost of this procedure.
  5. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    I read the article. The people at Neutocrerte have a full understanding of building science. The product goes over the ground and up the walls to the sill plate. They also insulate the joist end area. They will be excavating about 2-3 yards of dirt out of there and will remove all the existing, insulation. They also use some kind of disinfectant to kill all mold that might be there. It is a pretty thorough process that they have perfected over years. Check out their website for more information. the link is in my first post.
    If everything they say is true, my house is going to be much more comfortable and I will get the other end of the house heated with the stove. My kitchen is above the crawl space and it is the coldest room in the house. I think that the stove should be able to heat the whole house pretty well afterwards. We'll see... It can only get better.
    I forgot to add that to do the whole process including excavation, sterilization, application of the material, insulation of the sill and joist ends in a 14x15 space is going to be $3500. More than I want to pay, but you won't get me in there again, and I think that the overall improvement of the health, comfort, and energy savings will be worth it. I can use this towards the $1500 tax rebate too. I have about $800 left after the new stove last year.
    ScotO likes this.
  6. lobsta1

    lobsta1 Member

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    What do they base the charge on? Is there a standard square foot fee? Is this product suitable for walking on?
    Thanks
    Al
  7. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    I do not know exactly how they come up with the price. I suppose they calculate square footage but also have to figure degree of difficulty into the price. In my case they will be slithering about on their bellies and moving 2 or 3 yards of dirt in buckets. I'm sure the price would be different if they were working upright and using wheelbarrows. I believe it is strong enough to walk on. On their website, they mention one of the advantages being that it will create dry storage space. Check out their website or call them.
  8. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    They came yesterday and did the work. These guys should be on "Dirty Jobs"! There was a crew of four and they worked hard all day. They doug about 2.5 yards of dirt, rocks and other debris out working on their bellies and carrying it out in 5 gallon buckets. The crawlspace is now sealed from the outside and part of the conditioned space of my house.
    This is what it looked like before.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    After they pulled out all the rotten insulation, dirt, and assorted debris brought in by critters
    [​IMG]
    Fished job. All the dirt is covered, the product goes right up to the sill, sealing the foundation from moisture, drafts, and critters.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Now that I have this dealt with, I can make some progress on the other leaky, drafty spots in the walls above the crawlspace.
    These guys did excellent work. They also did a great cleanup when they were done. My basement may be cleaner after the work than it was before. The job was not cheap, but it is far better than I could ever do, nor would I ever care to spend a day in such a nasty place. Highly recommended to anybody with an unfinished space under the house.
    ScotO likes this.
  9. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    I've put insulation and sealed under an enclosed porch floor after cats used the nice soft sand as a kitty litter box.
    Fleas and cat piss and chit are no fun to be smelling , even with plywood sheets to slither on , in July heat.
    I've also had to help repair a frozen/busted sewer pipe under my grandmother's mobile home so completely under standing the willingness to pay someone else.

    That's interesting stuff. A neighbor has draft problem with his mobile home (banned here now, no permits to repair, you have to remove and build a house) that wants to do just that, but he's aged enough that he can't do it himself any more and would have to remove dirt in places for access, too.
  10. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    I'm a bit troubled by the concrete against the wood. That is normally prohibited. So did they insulate anything? I love the concrete floor idea and it looks great. Your plumbing access will now be much easier.
  11. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    The Neutocrete product is the insulation and it seals the ground and up the foundation walls. They added additional insulation along the sill and between the floor joists. It is not concrete, but a patented mixture with a concrete base and all sorts of additives to make is very lightweight, a moisture barrier, and an insulation. It has been perfected over 20 plus years. Wet it feels like spray foam with some grit in it.
    Yes, access will be better. I always feared what would happen if anything went bad, down there. It would be nearly impossible to make repairs. Now there are paths under all the pipes. I will even g in there to fix any problems now.
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