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New chain - are you kidding me?!!!

Post in 'The Gear' started by Creek-Chub, Mar 13, 2009.

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  1. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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    I have decided I am done trying to horse these 24-32+" rounds to split them and I'm going to at least start ripping them in half. Will a chisel chain be the best choice or is there a better choice for this type of work. I was reading on Oregon's website that they do not recommend their ripping chains for hand held operation.

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  2. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    I have used my full chisel to rip rounds on occasion, and it makes nice "curly fries"... :coolgrin: I know Bailey's (among other places I'm sure) sells "ripping chains" but I'm not sure it's worth it. Some of the folks on Arboristsite say that you can improve a standard chain for ripping if you sharpen it to a different angle (I forget what off hand) but then you should NOT use that chain for cross-cutting...

    If you have a saw you can dedicate as a "ripping saw" then it might be worth making a ripping chain, but otherwise I'd just stick with the same chain I use for crosscutting.

    Gooserider
  3. mbokie5

    mbokie5 New Member

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    Well, when I went to look, the wood waas grungy from the winter. So I didn't put the full chisel on the saw.

    Next dry day, with clean wood, I'll give it a go.

    Thanks guys.
  4. kevin j

    kevin j Minister of Fire

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    when you say ripping, you mean cutting parallel to the bark?
    Ripping chains typically have more space for chips, and different angles, but usually just for milling. For ripping normal rounds, normal chain works just fine, and quite fast. Keep the saw back from the log if you can as the clutch area tends to plug up with noodles. Some saws worse than others because of design. It does throw some wood reall fast and fun.
    Cross end grain, starting from the end of the log, is slow and brutal on the saw.

    k
  5. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Watch out for the hot exhaust too. I used to noodle a piece of dry dead wood and let the exhaust ignite it when building a fire. No matches required.
  6. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    I sometimes find this is the easiest way of dealing with these big rounds as well. Cut parallel with the bark. Don't waste your money on ripping chains, you won't gain much of anything for what you're trying to do. If you want to mod an existing chain just for noodling, a full chisel with the top plate ground a little less aggressive (say 15° - 20°) will work very well. You'll want to use a saw that has some spunk, and preferably one that has an inboard clutch since outboard clutches don't work well for noodling.

    BTW, save the noodles when you're done, they are EXCELLENT for starting fires. ;)
  7. mbokie5

    mbokie5 New Member

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    Why are the large rounds so difficult to split?
  8. Henz

    Henz New Member

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    I have a Husky 357xp saw and i have been running the standard Husky chains on them. they seem to be good, but now you have struck my interest in the stihl chains..Do you think that they would perform better than a husky chain???? whats the cost for a 20" stihl chain?
  9. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    I believe Husky chains are made for them by Oregon. Generally speaking, Stihl chains are a little better, but they typically cost significantly more. I have many of both, but I personally don't feel the Stihl chains are worth the large premium. It's hard to beat the deals you can get on Oregon chains through someone like Amicks.
  10. Henz

    Henz New Member

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    ok, jsut curious..If I were to fell alot of trees that might be one thing but for jsut bucking I dont know if I can say that the price difference would make up for it. Anyone else????
  11. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    Well, you can pretty much buy two Oregon chains through Amicks compared to one from your Stihl dealer... Like I said, there isn't that much of a difference. :)
  12. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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    Because they are HEAVY and I'm splitting mostly elm so they don't split (they just tear :)) so you have to keep moving this 100+ lb round around under the splitter until you can finally get an angle where splits will finally start coming off.
  13. WoodMann

    WoodMann Minister of Fire

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    Heh- you people think a new chain is something? file down the raker some, then you will have reached nirvannah.................
  14. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    or find out you don't have enough horses.
  15. WoodMann

    WoodMann Minister of Fire

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    It is a fine line, grasshopper- between brilliance and senility.........................
  16. Creek-Chub

    Creek-Chub New Member

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    I'm sure you know this, but.... it's all in the wrist. Horses or no...
  17. WoodMann

    WoodMann Minister of Fire

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    Whatever floats yer boat, eh........................
  18. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    You could try finding a local shop too. My local sells Husky - and that is what i own - and they always have chains made up and ready for sale.
  19. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    My opinion, and others may vary, is that I prefer to get factory made loops if I can do so in the sizes and chain types that I want. I am of the opinion that "shop-made" chains are a bit of an unknown quantity, and can potentially be a safety hazard...

    When you get a factory made loop, you can be about as certain as possible that the loop was assembled properly, using the manufacturer approved parts for that chain, on the appropriate automated equipment, to exactly the correct manufacturers specs, etc... Indeed it will probably be just about impossible to tell which link put the loop together - all the rivets will be identical, all the parts will be the same, and so on...

    There's a lot less certainty with shop made chains - What is the skill level of the guy that put it together? What kind of equipment did he use? Did he use the exact parts reccomended by the manufacturer for that chain, or "whatever's in the parts drawer that fit"? Are the rivets properly formed, with the same tension as the other links? I could go on, but suffice to say that you don't necessarily have the same level of quality assurance at "Joe's Chain Shop" as you do at the <Pick Your Brand> chain factory...

    This isn't to say that a properly made shop built chain is impossible, I'm sure there are a lot of people that DO make them right - but how do you know?

    Shameful confession time - MANY years ago, I worked in the garage of a store in a small town, I did minor work on cars and OPE of all sorts, including chainsaws. I got a two minute lesson from one of the other guys on how to use the chainsaw chain breaker and rivet spinner (I had to figure out how to use the chain grinder on my own) with NO mention of how to properly make up a chain. THAT I KNOW OF, none of the chains I made ever broke, but I would chalk that up more to luck than any kind of skill on my part. I've since read some of the chain manufacturer's websites, and in 20/20 hindsight, I was breaking most of the rules... I have no idea if the master links I used were proper - I had "inherited" a big box of them, pretty well jumbled together, and several rolls of chain - I would just try different links until I found one that fit, and used it. If I couldn't find a link that seemed to fit, or if a customer just wanted a chain shortened a link or two, I would press out the pins on one side, and then re-use whatever was left of the rivets. I had no real idea of how tight to spin the rivets down, I just went as tight as it would go, then if the link was stiff, bashed it a touch with a hammer...

    Maybe I was an exceptionally bad case, but these days I'd just as soon get factory made loops from Amick's or equivalent rather than assume that the guy making them up in the shop knows more about how to do it right than I did...


    Gooserider
  20. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy New Member

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    Last season I made the switch to STIHL non safety chains when I was looking to get a little more agressive with my smaller saw. The gentleman at our local farm supply store suggested downsizing the bar to a 14" ( don't usually cut anything bigger than 12-14 anyways) with a STIHL brand non safety. The difference is night and day over the stock husky safety chain.
  21. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    I agree with you Goose if you do not know and/or trust your shop. I asked my buddy about this and this shop actually uses factory Husqy loops for those that want them and then makes up chains for folks who want those...
  22. WoodMann

    WoodMann Minister of Fire

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    Absolutely; the best policy is to get the chain as is from the manufacturer. Who know's what you'll get from some kid peice- mealing something together.......................
  23. lexybird

    lexybird Minister of Fire

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    try as they might ,they cant beat a stihl chisel chain ,sure it costs more than walmart or tractor supply oregons but the stihl chains are in a league of their own
  24. Jay H

    Jay H New Member

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    Well, I bucked up 2 monster logs today and split them in the afternoon. I got a chance to try out my new-to-me Oregon semi chisel non-safety chain and wowza, it literally pulls itself into the wood... Damm. I still realize I can't handsharpen my chains for crap, I bought a dremel 7/32 bit and will try that on the chains I have.

    I think I will save the non-safetly full chisel chain I got from Amicks for the monster log that I will have to get to someday..

    Jay
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