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New chimney question

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by HillbillyRon, Jan 30, 2006.

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  1. HillbillyRon

    HillbillyRon Member

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    I am thinking about demolishing my 8 year stone veneer chimney and replacing it with a stainless steel type chimney. You may ask why I am doing this. The existing chimney is against an outside wall with a covered porch beyond. The roof pitch is 1 to 1 until it hits the porch where it flattens out considerably. The stone chimney is 5 feet wide (parallel with the outside wall) and is cricketed behind. The stonework is natural over metal lath on a wood frame and in my opinion was poorly done. I patched the mortar where the job was poor (holes) and sealed with a product known as Crack Magic by Chimney Sweep Co. (good stuff).
    The roof work at the cricket looks good (who knows underneath) but the cricket stops just short of the chimney edge. I have spent countless hours with a hose trying to locate the leaks and fix them to no avail. Seems to be coming from the stonework but who knows. The cap seems to be watertight also. In my opinion even if I get it sealed I will be battling this monster again just because of its design, materials and location. The home is log with tongue and grove ceiling. The wood has rotted underneath the porch roof a bit and I cut a small inspection port and found the chimney framing is also rotten (cannot tell how far). I am considering tearing this monster down and putting a stainless steel chimney pipe. Sorry for the long write but figured some history would help. OK here is my big question. I would like to install a woodburning stove in the basement below one day. Can this new chimney accomodate a woodburning stove and the existing fireplace above with the one flue. If so where can I find out the particulars on doing this. I live beyond the boonies, no mail delivery, no dominoes pizza, UPS...hah forget about it (too scared to drive up the road) With this said I want to be well educated in the installation so I can make sure the contractor is doing the job right. I appreciate any help in this matter as my stress level is driving me to drink (moonshine)

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  2. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Existing code won't allow you to connect more than one appliance to the same flue liner. That's the short answer to your question.

    As a practical matter, you wouldn't want to do that even if it was allowed by code, because you need to be able to control the air flow into the chimney and that would be impossible if it were connected to a fireplace and a wood stove.

    I believe the code in question is a national one, which means it applies to everywhere in the United States. There are insurance and liability implications to violating the code, which is another good reason not to do it.
  3. HillbillyRon

    HillbillyRon Member

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    Thanks for the info. I had seen a code requirement like that but they mentioned appliances of different fuels. I could see where it could cause problems but was not sure whether modern technology had fixed that. Do you still think the double wall stainless steel is best for something exposed to the elements like that. I have not priced any other metal chimney material yet but I figured the stainless would last. Evidently a fireplace does not put out the heat a woodburner does (from what I have read) so the double wall stainless is overkill but if it makes it last longer it may be worth the bucks.
  4. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    It applies to separate appliances, regardless of fuel burned.

    I don't think you can beat double-wall, insulated Class A ss chimneys for the money. I don't know anything about fireplaces (although I have 2 of them), but a chimney like that was designed for a wood stove or other airtight wood-burning appliance. I think the useful life of a ss chimney or chimney liner burning wood is 20-25 years. Easy to install, too.
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