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New Effecta Lambda 35kw install with 1000gal storage

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by Bill1472, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    well that would be a pretty standard "face cord" count, 16-18"X4'X8' (stacked)= 1 face cord
    I dont purchase it that way, i buy (when i buy) "full cord" or "poles" as some call it...
    and yes i know, like i said it was sad. old farm house that was poorly insulated and stiff wind poked in every crevasse.
    it was kind of like trying to heat a 1 1/2 story tent.. :grrr:

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  2. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    pretty sure there is not enough "big gap filler" in the world to button it up, but anyhow, a lot different situation now. newer home that is much better insulated and working on a much better set up..
  3. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    Thanks,
    ya i know right, really odd weather this year. I'm not complaining though, with moving and hauling in tanks and boiler.. I was pretty happy that there wasn't 3 feet of snow.
  4. goosegunner

    goosegunner Minister of Fire

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    Looks like you are going to have nice system!

    I see that you have some galvanized pipe like Bill's. I thought Black Iron was the pipe to used for heating?

    Anyone know if Galvanized will cause him problems down the road? Now is the time to change if it will.

    gg
  5. ewdudley

    ewdudley Minister of Fire

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    In a sealed system galvanized is not a problem. Black iron is normally less expensive so traditionally you won't find galvanized in sealed hydronic systems, but if for some reason galvanized is more convenient or it's what you have to work with, go for it. Shiny.

    However galvanized is incompatible with most heating system antifreeze.
  6. goosegunner

    goosegunner Minister of Fire

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    Good to know thanks!

    gg
  7. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    Sorry about all the sideways photos, I will re-format them and repost, trying to get some sorted in a timeline format. That should be interesting
  8. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    here we go, hopefully this works better...

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  9. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    oh there they are... all handsome!!

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  10. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    time to load em up...

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  11. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    and we have arrived!!

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  12. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    sure... why not, 2" of extra space. 41"tank, 44" door

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  13. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    oh ya, all in!!

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  14. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    Sorting through some other photos; should have some more ready by the end of the weekend.
  15. ALASKAPF185

    ALASKAPF185 Member

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    Galvanized is for future repair work, it closes up just like in potable systems. With all the nice equipment, it would be nice to see a couple extra bux put towards brass and dielectrics since code does call for it in Michigan ( on boilers too). The crud that will build up on it will eventually make its way somewhere. Nice job there anyways, good to see someone working in Michigan.
  16. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    Ouch... Ha..
    It has always been my understanding that you just can't use galvanized on gas because the flaking will clog ports.
    I'm new to boilers, but I'm not aware of any opening in the system that are as tight as gas ports. So what my understanding
    is, is that it basically just costs a little more than black steel when used in this application (closed system). Plus it's shiny, and that always looks
    good when your showing people stuff.
  17. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    Also... With the installation of an in-line screen before the boiler and pump I'm thinking I should be able to snag any of those "cruds" before they get "somewhere" that they could actually do any real harm.
    However, I do appreciate your thoughts and considerations as well as your concerns..
  18. ALASKAPF185

    ALASKAPF185 Member

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    Your 3/4 pipe will soon have a diameter of 1/4" which provides for some nice headloss and flow restriction. I don't know exactly what does it but galvanic action will close the pipe just like heater nipples on water heaters. It can only take a year in some cases to close that 3/4 right up. And this is even with the nipple having the plastic lining.
  19. nrford

    nrford Minister of Fire

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    I believe this pipe is 1-1/4" at smallest! In the absence of oxygen(this is a closed loop system)I find it hard to believe you will have any galvanic action. Perhaps you may have some on outside of pipe, but you would be able to see this. Please explain if I'm wrong thanks.
  20. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    Galvanic corrosion is an electrochemical process in which one metal corrodes preferentially to another when both metals are in electrical contact and immersed in an electrolyte.

    Electrolyte solutions are normally formed when a SALT is placed into a solvent such as water and the individual components dissociate due to the thermodynamic interactions between solvent and solute molecules, in a process called solvation.

    The presence of an "electrolyte and a electronic conducting path" between the metals is essential for galvanic corrosion to occur.
    .... Therefore the connection must have both right? Without one or the other then process is stalled... In a closed system without adding salt to produce an electrolyte the necessities are lacking... Where as if the system were an "open system" where the water would have the ability to evaporate, therefore increasing the "salt" in the solution, the mixing on different metals would pose a much greater threat...
    This problem is much more prevalent in open water systems, and systems of "softened" water...
    Just sayin....
    ....... ;-) next.....
  21. ALASKAPF185

    ALASKAPF185 Member

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    Well wether it was a potable system well or city, a boiler open or closed loop, water or glycol, I have pulled fully closed pipes out during repairs even 2" pipe. While right next to it a black iron pipe has little to no build up. I don't know why, its just what I have repaired many times. I would love to take pictures of every repair, so I can share , but its not on the top of my list during the day.
  22. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    That's very interesting.... however, I feel confident with the arrangement, I know some real close by wih a very similar setup and haven't had any problems of that sort in 30-35 years.
    I think perhaps that there may be more variables involved in a "2" pipe that clogged up in a closed loop boiler system" ..

    Pictures over a lifetime of a carreer would be really cool, I know the feeling of never having a camera in your hand when a "good shot" presents it's self.. ha
    thanks AK
  23. Cebulskig

    Cebulskig New Member

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    Almost got it wrapped up... Air testing tonight before filling with water tomorrow.
    Fingers crossed!!! Super Stoked.
  24. RobC

    RobC Minister of Fire

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    Nice set up.... As far as the choice of fittings goes.... There have been a few posts on using galvanized pipe on this site if you search. After you get system up and running you may want to consider flushing, refilling & adding water treatment.
    Cheers Rob
  25. huffdawg

    huffdawg Minister of Fire

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    we have galvanized pipe on our ship in cooling applications using seawater . we use it for about 3 years then end up replacing it. Company is to cheap to do it right.
    Also we had galvanized 3" pipe supplying all the domestic water needs. Just got it ripped out and replaced with stainless viega piping . I wished I would of took a pic. of the old galvanized pipe it had lots of cones of rust growing up in it. it was choked up by at least half pipe diameter. That pipe has been in use since the ship was built in 2004.

    I would imagine in a closed loop heating system with oxygen scrubbers that galvanized would last much longer.

    Huff

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