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New Heatilator Eco WS22 Install

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by PhilDeez406, Mar 16, 2013.

  1. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    I've finally started a build that i've been waiting months to do. I'm tearing out my old pre-fab fireplace, and putting a new hearth and wood stove in it's place. I'm going to build a six inch raised hearth pad for the stove, taking into account the clearances for the stove. My only problem is I am not fully understanding the requirements for the floor protection needed for this stove. I was going to use one inch thick hearth stone over a half inch of cement backer board, but I can't figure out if that will be sufficient. Can anybody help? Here are a few pictures of the progress so far.
    first.JPG second.JPG finished.JPG

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  2. mygasfireplacerepair

    mygasfireplacerepair Member

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    Floor protection is all about R-Value. I would buy a product called Micore 300 and use that underneath the backer board. The Micore 300 is basically a mineral substrate board that has a extremely high R- Value for its thickness (about 1.03 for a 1/2" thick board). Look in your installation manual for the stove. It should tell you what R-value is required, then make sure you exceed this.

    Looks good so far, good luck in the project
  3. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

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    The manual calls for basically ember protection with minimal thermal resistance (R) of 0.13:

    In US installations, it is necessary to install a floor protector of a
    minimum of 1/4 inch (6.35mm), k value = 1.95 and R value = 0.13
    of non-combustilbe material a minimum of 16 inches (406mm)
    in front of glass and 8 inches (203mm) to bothsides of the fuel
    loading door. Open the door and measure 8 inches (203mm) from
    the side edge of the opening in the face of the appliance.

    An R value of 0.13 is pretty low and your stone over cement backer board should do it. You can check your building materials on this table:

    http://www.chimneysweeponline.com/horvalue.htm

    KaptJaq
  4. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    Thanks for the help so far. So if i'm looking at the table right my total would be 1.349, and I need more than .13? It looks like from the table the lower the number the better??? I might as well be reading a foreign language.
  5. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

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    "R" is the thermal resistance a material has, the ability for it to stop the transmission of heat. For "R" values the higher the number the better and "R" values are additive. i.e. if you are using 1" of slate over 1/2" hardibacker you have a total of 0.36, hardibacker is 0.13 per 1/4 inch, slate is 0.1 per inch. The 0.36 exceeds your required 0.13 so you would be good to go.

    If your hearth materials add up to 1.349 you radically exceed the required "R" value of 0.13 so it is good.

    EDIT: Exactly what materials are you using and how thick is each one?

    KaptJaq
    PapaDave likes this.
  6. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    Wow so it looks like I won't have to go as thick as I thought. Is it unsual for a stove to need that little of protection? That seems kinda thin to me. If i'm reading the chart right a 1/4 inch of hardibacker would be sufficient right?
  7. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

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    Many stoves have bottom heat shields built in. They need little or no thermal resistance, mainly ember protection in case something hot falls out of the stove while the door is open. Yes, 1/4 hardibacker will meet your requirement but those requirements are minimums. I usually exceed the minimum by a little just to feel more comfortable with my work.

    Good luck with your install. I'll be waiting for the pictures...

    KaptJaq
  8. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    Cool thanks for the help. I'll be sure to get some pictures up of the progress.
  9. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    Here are a few pictures of the progress on my hearth and stove project. I started on the brick veneer last night, but ran out of adhesive so I will have to finish that this weekend. The stove install company will be coming on April 30th to install the stove and chimney system. I can't wait.

    Attached Files:

  10. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    I was orginally going to go with the tile that is in the pictures, but after some thought I think i'm going to go with inch thick hearth stone. I think it will compliment the other stone work nicely.
  11. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    Update: I finally got the stone done on the front of the hearth. While working on it the other day I had to pull the hearth away from the wall and just happend to look down the hole where the old outside air came in. I noticed there was a wire that fed the blower on the fireplace that had been chewed pretty severly by mice. Both the hot and neutral were bare. I have no idea how it didn't catch fire or at least trip the breaker. Anyway I put a junction box in to replace that wire and while I was under there I ran a new line that comes up through the floor. I put a outlet in under the hearth to allow a blower to be plugged in from underneath so the wire won't be seen. Then I continued the wire under the hearth and back into the orginal switch for the blower. Once I get the stone up on the wall, I'm gonna add some acdent lighting on top of the mantel to highlight that area. What do you think so far?

    Attached Files:

  12. Lighting Up

    Lighting Up Feeling the Heat

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    Be careful with adhesive...others have complained of a smell when the stove is crusing at 500 degrees...
  13. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    I wondered about that. i think the stone on the front of the hearth will be ok, but was thinking of using the regular mortar on the rear. I figured the mortar would give a little more insulating value, and unlike the adhesive won't get hot and start dropping stone. I am using loc tite adhesive in a caulk gun. Has anybody else ever used that type?
    Lighting Up likes this.
  14. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Don't know squat about building a hearth, or building anything really, but I finally saw one of those stoves in my local stove shop the other day. That thing is gonna be a great heater.
  15. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    Ya Bart I see you have the Englander 30. Thats what I was orginally wanting, but was unable to locate anybody that could get me one even remotely close. Even home depot was unable to get me one. I went into the local stove shop and seen and felt one in action. Wow it can really throw some heat. It was heating the entire showroom which was about 2500+ square feet with a wall of old single pane windows eight foot tall with it 10 or so degrees outside. It was amazing to feel the difference the heat that puts out. I haven't been around many wood stoves, it's so weird for the stove to heat objects (including people) instead of forced air just heating the air.
  16. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    Like a hollywood set. Don't look too close and that's a real massive stone fireplace. Until you start taking it apart. They aren't real stones (what are they anyway-- or is it real stone veneer?). Something lightweight just glued and attached to combustible 2x4. No wonder putting a stove insert into a prefab ZC fireplace or sitting a stove on the hearth of one can be dangerous without knowing the construction details.

    Nice descriptive photos. Good luck with the project.
  17. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    Update: I got the drywall taped and mudded this weekend, and even had the time to get some primer and paint thrown up. Last night I started putting the stone on the wall. I have the tile I plan to use laying in front of the stone. I was at Lowes the other day and found that same tile with a bull nose edge to use at the front of the hearth. I can't decide if the stone and tile will look good together. What do you think? wallbrick.JPG
  18. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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    Are you going to stop the tile at the electric outlet or tile around it?
  19. PhilDeez406

    PhilDeez406 New Member

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    The wall stone will end before each outlet. That way I don't have to mess with changing the outlet box. The dimensions are five feet long by five feet tall.
  20. daryl

    daryl Feeling the Heat

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    I hate to say this but the chimney is not Class A so you can not hook a wood stove to it. Fireplace chimney is rated for 1500 degrees not 2100. Fireplace chimney is not a good idea, If its air cooled how are you going to cool it, fireplaces have a starter collar that channel the air in the right way. Put in a class A chimney system and have a safe system.
  21. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Good eye daryl, that does look like air-cooled pipe. Are you intending to replace the chimney pipe Phil?
  22. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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  23. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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  24. daryl

    daryl Feeling the Heat

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    my bad
  25. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    Welcome to the wonderful world of radiant heat.:cool:

    Nice work on the hearth, and good luck with the rest of the install!:)

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