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New Stove After Only One Year? Need reality check

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by lumbering on, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    Your burn time also depends on your house's ability to hold the heat. If your house is in the high 70s you can leave the stove cruise with a 200-250 degree stovetop for many hours as the burn cycle progresses through the coaling stage. But if your getting cold already you must reload and let er rip sooner. xmas week last year was mostly 1 load days for me.

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  2. Trilifter7

    Trilifter7 Feeling the Heat

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    Good point seasoned oak. In general though burn times are avg times given for avg or normal heating needs. Extremes one way or another in heating needs will affect burn times. Drafty houses will affect that as well but again, I think we are generally talking averages under normal conditions.
  3. lumbering on

    lumbering on Feeling the Heat

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    So burn time is really best defined as amount of time between reloads, meaning how long can a load of wood burn for and still have usable coals for a reload?

    Burn time is not necessarily equal to usable heat output.
  4. northwinds

    northwinds Minister of Fire

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    That's a fair way to put it. I can get a 20 hour burn time from my Isle Royale with a full load of oak, and a deep ash bed--maybe even longer, but there's not much heat going on after ten hours. Most manufactures use the "usable coals for reload" burn time because it sounds more impressive to sell stoves.
  5. Trilifter7

    Trilifter7 Feeling the Heat

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    Yep, north winds is right. I have seen some manufacturers list heat life for actually hours of usable heat and burn time for coaling. Heat life is still subjective and all times are based on lab conditions with optimal fuel and air. In general firebox size is a good judge of burn time. CAT or secondary burn are also indicators of burn time.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Agreed. We've tried to define this as the period of meaningful heat, but meaningful for one person could be 400F to 400F in a burn cycle and for another house and stove it might be 200F to 200F. Note that secondary burn is not the best indicator. Considerable heat is generated, sometimes for hours from wood that has fully outgassed (charcoal) and is no longer secondary burning. I especially notice this burning locust.
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  7. Trilifter7

    Trilifter7 Feeling the Heat

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    You're right BG, I worded that wrong. I meant the type of reburn system can have an affect on burn times. Most CAT stoves will get slower, lower long burns than secondary burn tubes will by design.
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    True, cat stoves can burn at a lower rate without smoldering. Though the glass may blacken. They are good shoulder season stoves. Though once you turn up the heat, their pretty much the same. Our soapstone stoves and cast iron jacked stoves like our T6 use mass to accomplish similar results. Woodstock has found the sweetspot combining the two.
  9. Trilifter7

    Trilifter7 Feeling the Heat

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    Yep, I agree.
  10. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    Even at 250 Degrees stove top your still getting usable output. My particular stove puts out more heat than i need during the first half of the burn and gets the house up to the upper end of my comfort range ,about 76-77 During the second half (Coaling) it slowly drops to the lower end 70-72ish. The harman will still have coals for a relight, 24 hours into a burn, my other 2 stoves (at different locations)dont go near as long.
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    It's possible, particularly if the house interior is fully warmed up, but this totally depends on the stove size, house size, house insulation outside temps, solar gain and wind. The T6 has enough mass to act as a thermal damper which big stone stoves do also.

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