New to Wood Burning - Old Mill

Alex C Posted By Alex C, Dec 1, 2013 at 7:32 PM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Alex C

    Alex C
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 28, 2013
    54
    8
    Loc:
    Southern NH
    I am new to wood burning, but I have just acquired an Old Mill wood stove that I am going to be installing for use as my primary heat source. I have never installed a wood stove and I had a few questions regarding the topic.

    Firstly, the chimney pipe:
    Is there any benefit to running the chimney pipe through the wall instead of right out the roof? My wood stove has the opening for the stove pipe on the top, if that has any consequence. Either way, it seems to be my understanding that the triple wall chimney pipe is frequently used for either installation, would that be correct?

    Secondly, the fire bricks:
    Should these all fit tightly in the stove? My stove has flanges to have fire bricks on the bottom, sides, and rear of the stove. Are the bricks supposed to be cut to fit snugly, or is the fact that they are a little loose no big deal? I read another post in the forum about the bricks and one gentleman seems to say you don't need them, but since my stove manufacturer has provided the flanges for them, I believe that using them would be the best idea.

    Any information would be greatly appreciated, looking forward to using the site.
     
  2. webby3650

    webby3650
    Master of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 2, 2008
    6,497
    1,534
    Loc:
    Indiana
    It is best to run the chimney straight up and out of the roof. Using a T system through the wall will not perform as well and the Tee itself adds some cost.
    You want to use double wall Class A chimney.

    The firebricks do not need to fit tightly, after use, ash will fill in the gaps making it all tighten up. Whoever said that you don't need them was dead wrong.
     
  3. oldspark

    oldspark
    Guest 2.
    NULL
    

    Two types of triple wall, what type are you refering to?
     
  4. mellow

    mellow
    Resident Stove Connoisseur 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 19, 2008
    4,517
    600
    Loc:
    Salisbury, MD
    If you don't have an existing chimney your install is going to be quite expensive, you will have to go with 8" pipe for that older pre-epa stove which is more expensive.

    Depending on how many sq feet you are trying to heat a simple new EPA stove can be had in the $800 range and will allow you to use the less expensive 6" pipe and it will use less wood.

    If you are going to keep it I would suggest adding a baffle plate like we have seen done to Fishers to help clean up your burn a bit: http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/fisher-wood-stove.43851/#post-551153
     
  5. Alex C

    Alex C
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 28, 2013
    54
    8
    Loc:
    Southern NH
    Thanks, I had thought it was a 6" pipe. I don't have an existing chimney, this will be a new install. I was under the impression that I could run single wall pipe up to 18" below the roof penetration, and then finish it with the roof kit and double wall class A pipe. Also, someone already installed some sort of baffle on the unit. It has a thick gauge plate that sits between the firebox and the flue, it looks to me to be in good shape. My house is an 800 SF cabin style house on piers in New England. I live on the lake and the wind can get under the house as well, so I am expecting to use more wood than another similar sized house that doesn't see as much weather.
     
  6. Alex C

    Alex C
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 28, 2013
    54
    8
    Loc:
    Southern NH
    I was referring to the DuraVent DuraPlus stuff they sell at home depot.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page