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new used old buck stove 27000

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by sclarke, Oct 21, 2011.

  1. sclarke

    sclarke Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Messages:
    17
    Loc:
    Cincinnati, OH
    Having grown up in sunny FL, and now living in southern Ohio, I do not know much about wood stoves, etc. But I really like the idea of owning one and I have plenty of wood, so I bought a used Buck stove (1983 regular I believe). The stove is in pretty good shape and burns real well, starts right up. It is set up as an insert and I have a 12 inch masonry chimney.
    questions
    1) I thought these should be pretty air tight but there is a large gap at the top where the doors close together. it is part of the construction and it is about the size of a nickel. Is that supposed to be there or is something missing?
    2) the windows cloud up quickly with soot I guess. I can scrape them down and an hour later they are black again. I have a small house (1300 sq ft) so I dont need it too hot right now. could that cause the build up of soot or smoke on the glass doors? I read somewhere that if the fire is not too hot, then this might happen. the wood I am using is pretty good, well-seasoned, no bark.
    This is a great forum for people like me who did not grow up using one of these.
    thanks

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  2. tfdchief

    tfdchief Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    3,331
    Loc:
    Tuscola, IL
    sclarke,
    First, do you have the manual? If not you can download it from the Buck web page. I would suggest that first, read through it, and you will gain some knowledge you need to run this stove.

    Secondly, You need to know this is an old stove, old technology. It is difficult to burn efficiently and cleanly. Therefore it will produce some creosote in your chimney which can be a flue fire hazard if you do not understand how it happens and how to prevent it. The new technology of the new EPA certified stoves makes this much less a problem, and safer.

    That said, I have been successfully burning the smaller 26000 for a long time. But you really need to educate yourself if you are going to use it. Buy a new EPA Certified stove if you can afford it. Also, it sounds like you have it simply stuck in the fireplace, venting directly into the smoke chamber of the fireplace, i. e. not directly connected to the chimney. You will find in the manual, back then, that was the way they instructed you to install it. Today, we know there are many pitfalls to that type of installation (slammer install) and it is highly recommended that you not burn it that way.

    To answer question #1, yes that is the way it is made. Some do block that with a small piece of 3/4 in gasket material.
    question #2, Modern EPA stoves have an air wash system that keeps the glass clean. The old stove did not. Not burning hot, smoldering the fire, will make this worse and if you burn hot enough, you will keep the glass somewhat clean.

    Do a search for Buck 27000 and even the Buck 26000, they are the same except for size. You will find a lot of reading and useful information.
  3. sclarke

    sclarke Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Messages:
    17
    Loc:
    Cincinnati, OH
    Thanks...I have the manual downloaded and will read it carefully. I spoke with the salesman for the local Buck dealer and he said it would be fine to insert it this way, without the pipe. But I realize this is not ideal. I thought I would give it a try this year to see how it goes and then maybe invest in a new stove next year. this way I can recoup my money on the used Buck (probably) or just put it in the out building.
    Thanks again for the input!

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