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New wood burning gal-Hearthstone Clydesdale

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Firedancer, Oct 17, 2013.

  1. Firedancer

    Firedancer New Member

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    ....and super excited!

    Hello all! First, what a wonderful forum. I've been looking around here for a few weeks now and am so glad to have come across this site. Many questions have already been answered by just browsing these pages. Thanks!!

    Purchased the Clyde...hubby and his buddy installed it this past weekend. Not fully complete because of missing parts that attach the surround (hearthstone shipping them to me) bummer BUT can still build a fire. :)

    After reading the many threads here I became nervous. So much for feeding the insert wood and heating my house lol. I realize now that there is much more involved. So, I question my dealer on how to monitor the temp of an insert? His answer??? (You veteran burners may want to sit down or crack a beer or something) and I quote, "You don't need to-its an insert" (gets better)
    "I have never heard of anyone monitoring the temp of an insert". Now I know better than that.
    Not to beat a dead horse but what would you all recommend? I am currently using a magnetic gauge that I have centered on top front of firebox under the grill. I figure its better than nothing. Hubby does own an IR but honestly, where should I point the thing??

    I've already done my break-in fire. That went very well. Wasn't sure how many break-ins I should do for a new stove so I did one more the very next night. Also went well, and really I just wanted to play. It hasn't been cold here in NJ yet anyway. My third fire (that's all so far) I got the stove up to a little over 300. Blowers kicked in at around 200-all went well. I did smell the paint etc that I read about here..I then let the stove burn out-like I said...it's not cold here yet.

    I guess I would just appreciate anything you all can teach me. The good, the bad and the ugly. ;) I plan on starting out slowly so I can really learn the stove. I don't plan on ever getting her over 400 because that scares me. Lol. IF I feel it's running too hot my plan is to completely shut the air and adjust blowers to high. Is that correct? I figure the blowers might help pull heat from the stove.

    About my house-it's a ranch. 1600 square feet and I do hope to heat it all winter long. The insert is inside a masonry fireplace. I do have another wood burning fireplace in the kitchen but don't plan on using it anymore. Wasted heat lol.

    I will be the person largely responsible for feeding/monitoring this stove because I'm home more than the hubby. I appreciate all the advice and just general comments about the stove you can provide me with.

    Cheers! And thanks again!!
    n3pro likes this.

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  2. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Just learn to operate the insert with the thermometer where you've got it. Your thoughts about what to do if you're feeling uncomfortable about high temp sound just right. Your dealer sounds kinda hinky. Where are you in NJ? We have lots of members here in NJ. Welcome to the forums! Rick
  3. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    Welcome to the forums, FD !! Always nice to see another Sistah in the house ;)

    It'll be cold enough soon, so get those break in fires done, so you can let 'er rip !!

    I place my thermo over the right hand side of the door, it's the hinged side. It gives me a decent clue as to how we're cooking in the insert.

    My PE is comfy cruising at about 750, your mileage may vary :p
  4. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    It sounds like you've got it down really. Its always good to do your own research especially when you have a uneducated salesman!
    If you are planning on heating your whole house, your gonna need to get it hotter than 400! After you get the hang of it, let it rip a little! 600 is more like it! After the house is warmed up then 400-550 is a more normal range.
  5. Firedancer

    Firedancer New Member

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    Yeah, I'm not comfortable with any info dealer gave us. We do have a friend who burns so that and this site has been wonderful.

    I'm in central NJ...thanks for the warm welcome.
  6. Firedancer

    Firedancer New Member

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    Ha! So people ARE monitoring INSERT temps! ;)
    Wasn't sure how many break in fires I should do. The manual said 'a break in' fire. I followed the directions-warmed up nicely then let it go out. I did do that 2 nights in a row.

    Btw... It is stupid how excited I am to witness my very first secondary burn...I can't wait for that!
  7. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    No, it's not. Pretty cool to watch "the dance" :)

    Keep in mind, that every time you do a break in, and the temp goes up, you will have more of that paint smell for a bit. Best to do it now, whilst the windows can be opened, girl friend :)
  8. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Most monitor it with a a magnetic stove thermometer on a corner of the face of the insert. My testing has shown that to register around 150 degrees less than the actual temp on the top plate of the insert. With the IR thermo shoot it in between the surround and the stove top at the middle of the top plate. Insert temp monitoring is a challenge for sure.

    Welcome to the wood heating addiction. That Clyde is a nice insert. I darn near bought one in 2006. Then decided to put a free stander in the fireplace.
  9. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    You did good by having 3 break in fires. Other stoves require 3 or 4 getting progressively hotter.
    Secondary fires are exciting! So many people out there never experience it, mostly because of their green firewood and poor burning practices.
    It's quite a spectacle!

    Attached Files:

    eclecticcottage and Sons924 like this.
  10. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I will save my usual sermon about secondary burn chasing till she has been enjoying the insert for a while. ;lol
  11. Firedancer

    Firedancer New Member

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    Like a kid at Christmas. I'm excited..do I then want to cut the air a bit when it happens? If I understand it, that secondary will really heat up the stove, correct? I think I then cut the air just until that flame gets "lazy"???
  12. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    The secondary will actually fire better after the air is reduced.
  13. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I am the guy that thinks the blasting gas burner looking stuff up top is a parlor trick. Fun to watch but don't over fire your stove just to make it happen. If the stove is over five hundred degrees and no smoke is coming out of the chimney, you have it just right. The secondary air is picking off the stray un-burned gases like it is supposed to and you can see the little "poofs" up by the baffle when it does it.

    Of course I am in the minority. Most folks love the light show. >> I did too. For one season.
  14. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Yeah. As you close down the primary air control some it shifts the air intake to the secondary air and the unrestricted "EPA hole" intakes. You have a certain amount of draft and air is gonna follow the path of least resistence.
  15. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    webbie3650 I went to quote your last post and accidentally deleted it. I just washed my fingers and can't do a thing with them.
    Firedancer likes this.
  16. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    'Bout time. !!!
    BrotherBart likes this.
  17. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    ;lol
  18. Ram 1500 with an axe...

    Ram 1500 with an axe... Minister of Fire

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    Fire it up you will be ok, just pay attention and learn while your burning as you go, you will love it, if you see it glowing orange then you may be in trouble so slow it down. You need dry wood, but that is another subject for you to learn about.... And what Re these cracks about ....nj....
  19. kksalm

    kksalm Member

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    Dry wood is the key, absolutely.
    This will be our third season burning our Clydesdale. I bought two soapstone bricks to lay our fire on. We get the kindling going with the door cracked open till its going good. I know that'll get some negative comments coming but that's simply the way it is. Where I live in Alaska it's either spruce or birch. We start with the ultra dry beetle killed spruce and if we need prolonged heat we'll add some well seasoned birch. I'll add some spruce just to enjoy the visual of the afterburn but usually don't after a couple hours of going to bed. Otherwise it'll be too warm for sleeping, I know it'll stay warm through the night with all the mass of the stove encased in the mass of the fireplace.
    The dog thinks we put it in for him.
    Have a wonderful and warm day!
  20. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    Welcome to the forum, I almost bought that insert too, looks really nice.

    Don't worry to much about over firing, just keep on eye on it and if some reason it starts to run away (it shouldn't) turn the blower on full blast.
  21. Firedancer

    Firedancer New Member

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    Thanks for all the great advice and comments! I have a great woodpile-about six cords-that isn't as dry as I thought (thanks to this site I now know that) but we are working on that.

    Wont be home today-it's getting chilly :) so gonna fire it up on Sunday. After only three small fires increasing heat as i go, I'm certainly not ready to lite and leave. Need to sit around and study it lol....maybe with a drink or two..or...
    Sons924 likes this.
  22. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    You are better prepared and informed than a lot of folks starting out with a new stove. I think you are going to do just fine. With a good stock of wood and a great insert connected to a nice liner it sounds like you are good to go for a nice winter heating experience. After your break-in fires are done, take a couple pictures. We love stove eye-candy, especially when there is fire! Welcome aboard.
  23. Firedancer

    Firedancer New Member

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    I've done a lot of lurking around here...great information.

    I'm a bit confused about the break-in fires. My manual explains how to do it but not how many times to do it. It seems to suggest one. I did two...just warm enough to where I can still touch the top and sides of the stove. Then I let those fires die out. My third fire was about 300 degrees-maybe a tad warmer than 300. Couldn't touch the stove and definitely smelled the paint etc. blowers kicked in...I played with the fan speed a bit and then I let that fire die out. I didn't hear the stove making noise from the heat, although I think the steel or whatever that material is on the back of the stove made a little noise then stopped.

    So, break ins?? Am I broken in? Do you think it's ok to really get a fire going and keep it going?
  24. Firedancer

    Firedancer New Member

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    Another thing...my manual doesn't recommend getting the stove temp to 600 which is why running hotter than 400/450 scares me lol.
  25. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Yes, the stove is broken in. Go for a full fire with your next burn. You will need to get the stove up to around 550F to fully bake in the paint. Don't get too anxious about the 600F guideline. This is a target for a normal cruising temperature. It is not going to overfire the stove if it goes a little higher. To begin with just don't load the stove full. Start with a medium-sized fire with four, 4 to 6" thick splits and see how that goes. Take it in steps and you will be confidently burning in a short while.

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