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Newbie needs help with identifying wood stove

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by mjmmessina, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. mjmmessina

    mjmmessina New Member

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    I'm looking into adding a small woodstove to a remote 14 x 20 cabin that I own. I found this woodstove online and was seeking help identifying it? Any ideas on who makes it, how old it is, is it a good product, ect. Any help would be greatly appreciated since I'm a novice when it comes to wood burners

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  2. Heatsource

    Heatsource Minister of Fire

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    may do the job for you, but will need large clearances(36"), or wall shielding(12").
    also, will be very low in efficiency

    no idea about the maker...
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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  4. mjmmessina

    mjmmessina New Member

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    After inspecting the cook stove, it was made by a company called Jacobs Manufacturing co from Bridgeport Alabama. Does anybody know anything about that company?
  5. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

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    Never heard of it, but for a small cabin that stove will perform fine. It will require a lot of attention since the firebox is small....feed it frequently. Keep a lot of soft wood on hand to get the small fire box up to temps quickly then add in some hardwood splits for a longer burn.
  6. tfdchief

    tfdchief Minister of Fire

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    Can't help. But it sure is a nice looking old stove! I wish we would have found something that nice for our hunting cabin. But, as BG has said, if you want to spend a little money the Englander VL-17 would be perfect. Admittedly I am an old timer, but I would burn that stove in heart beat in a cabin. I like it!
  7. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    So did you get it ??

    Looks like their version of a coal / wood combination. The large intake vents in ash door would pull air through grates for coal, and closing them, a wood fire on top would pull air from the top intakes. With coal, you would control rate of burn with bottom, and just crack the top intake for oxygen to ignite coal gas escaping from coal.

    Here's a few more.

    Jacobs Junior.jpg Jacobs Junior

    Box King 22 Jacobs.jpg Box King 22

    Jacobs Art No. 8.jpg Jacobs Art #8 - This is a laundry stove for holding large tubs at working height.

    Jacobs Mfg Cook Stove.jpg Jacobs Manufacturing Cook Stove

    Here's an auction with close ups of "Jacobs Pride" Cook Stove; http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/5575199

    Ed at antiquestoves.com may have some, or be able to give you some company history.
    Back then it was difficult shipping heavy items, so stoves were made at local foundries and populated smaller areas with their models. Many stoves became a local thing, so only the old timers in the area are going to remember them. Not something you're going to find on the net. As central heating systems came into being, many foundries started making other items like pots and pans, castings for machines, pipe fittings, and other iron items. Looking into local foundries, you'll find most of them made stoves.
  8. tickbitty

    tickbitty Minister of Fire

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    I've seen small "cook stoves" like that which were supposedly laundry stoves. Smaller, lower for the big cauldron I guess?
  9. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    The laundry stove on the back porch could be fired up to cook in the summer without adding heat to the house with the kitchen cookstove. That might have gained them the cookstove name. I thought we only cooked scrapple on laundry stoves in Pennsyl-tucky.
    Monday's were laundry day before diesel powered locomotives. All firemen on trains had to keep "clean stacks" with a light fire and the engineer couldn't "pour it on" and throw cinders out the stack in towns with everyones laundry out to dry. When the laundry was done, out comes the portable bake oven, and that's one of the only baking days in the summer. That's still the way it is in some PA communities. Us PA Dutch are slooow to change !
    In today's legal terminology, an exempt "cookstove" has to have an oven on the right and firebox on the left.

    Laundry Stoves.jpg

    They were low so you can plunge in the water tub on it.

    Rapid Washer.jpg
  10. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Found a laundry stove at an estate sale the other day. Had spaces for 12 irons to be heated at a time, on the sides of the stove. Had 9 irons still.
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Are you sure that wasn't a golfing stove? lol
  12. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

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    I bet Jacobs was absorbed by the current US Stove Co. USSC has a stove manufacufacturing plant in Bridgeport, AL. Bridgeport is kinda famous...the mayor wants to secede from Alabama and have town become part of Tennessee.
  13. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    It was actually super cool. I wish had a spare 200 bucks and a stove museum to store it in. Had 12 flat spots to heat irons and as has been mentioned was low enough for a tub.

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