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Newbie questions re firebricks, grate and flu for Atlantic 224

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by icekreaman, Dec 24, 2010.

  1. icekreaman

    icekreaman New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    Loc:
    Franklin, MA
    Hi all,

    So I picked up a used Atlantic 224 for $120. It looks like the seams have been resealed and it has a new coat of polish. My original plan was to pick up a small stove to heat my 300 sq ft shed, but this stove looks so nice and is bigger than I was expecting so I thought I might try it as an insert in my fireplace in the family room. I slid it in and attempted to light it without success. My biggest problem is my green wood, which I'm a bit annoyed about because I explained to the guy that I need wood that I can burn today and I end up with the wettest wood I've ever had. Crappy wood aside, I was wondering if I need to put firebricks or a grate in the woodstove which is essentially an empty metal box? Also I didn't put any pipe on the stove, I just thought the smoke would get drawn up the chimney - which it did... but after a little thought I figured I'm probably only getting a fraction of the draft... and maybe this is a problem?

    Anyway, I think what I'm going to do is move the woodstove to the shed as originally planned, put some pipe on it and buy some decent wood, which brings me to my last question - can anyone recommend someone who will bring me seasoned wood when I ask for seasoned wood? I'm West of Boston.

    Thanks for reading...!!

    Jon.

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  2. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,284
    Loc:
    Antrim, NH
    Firewood can be hit and miss and the definition of "seasoned" seems lost on most of the folks selling it. Try looking around for kiln dried wood.

    As for the install.. please do not use a stove which is simply "slid in" to a fireplace. It is a very dangerous and non-code installation which can expose you to very serious safety issues (house fires, carbon monoxide).

    As for the inner workings of the stove, I personally don't know anything about that particular stove, but I'm sure someone will be along shortly who does.
  3. heatwise

    heatwise Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Messages:
    414
    Loc:
    ohio
    Here's a late reply, we had one of these stoves back in the 70's. It was bought new and installed down in our basement. The house had a basement fireplace that was bricked with a clean out door and the stove was placed out in the room with some pipe going straight up and then angled back through a hole drilled above the fireplace. They're was a damper in the upright section. From what I remember we had about 1 or 2" of sand in the bottom of the firebox along with some ashes. The manual said that the idea was to burn the wood from the front to the back like a cigar. Great memories from this stove back in some of the coldest winers in Cincinnati.

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