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"no-name" stove identification, etc.

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Willo, Jan 23, 2013.

  1. Willo

    Willo New Member

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    Jan 23, 2013
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    [​IMG]
    I bought this stove used awhile back. Found no name on it, would have to look up the number cast into one of the parts, it does have "Korea" or "made in Korea" on it.
    I'm guessing the upper part had a catalytic converter, but the space is empty now, separated from the lower part by a cast iron baffle.
    It can take 24" logs with a little room to spare but only has a 4" stovepipe fitting on the back.
    I've been curious as to who made it or what it was copied from.
    I'm also wondering if this basic configuration has a name.
    I'm wondering if anybody still makes them in this style and this large.
    My only complaint about it is that it doesn't have a grate & ash pan, so in a cold spell I can't burn it continually. I have to let it burn down to ash & shovel them out.
    If I could find one like this with an ash pan I'd like to get one. The wide style stoves won't fit properly in the room.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    It's a Jotul F118 knockoff, probably from Scandia. Never had a catalyst. The upper section is to scavenge heat from the flue gases.
  3. Willo

    Willo New Member

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    Thanks for that. I looked up the Jotul and see the resemblance.
    I saw mentioned that it doesn't have an ash pan either.
    I'm still hoping to learn if this style of stove has a name, for facilitating my word search with an end to seeing if I can find a large stove of this type that I can burn without having to let burn out for scooping out the ashes.
    I have a few space heaters but wood is my primary heat and in a cold spell I like to keep it going.
  4. tickbitty

    tickbitty Minister of Fire

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    I see the post was moved since the stove is a Pre-EPA stove, but maybe someone can take the challenge and see if they know of a big stove that takes long logs, and has an ash pan. And maybe is an EPA Stove? For one who is not worried about the big glass windows, just the heat!

    The Jotul Black Bear (new version of the Jotul your stove is in imitation of) takes a 24" log! But it's still kind of a small stove, and I don't know if it has an ashpan. Bet a search on hearth.com forums would answer those questions quickly though!
  5. Willo

    Willo New Member

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    I looked at several links describing the Bear and one said it doesn't have an ash pan.
    I'm pretty much restricted to this configuration because of where I have it placed.
    Looks like it isn't exactly cheap either and I might reconcile myself to the inconvenience.
    There's times when I'd like a window in the stove but I don't sit & look at it anyway. I mainly keep an eye on my stovepipe thermometer and listen to the draft through the intake wassname.
    I live on a farm in Va., and don't even know what the regs are here.
  6. Smoky

    Smoky New Member

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    Jan 19, 2013
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    Burned a Black Bear, no ash pan, one of my best ones yet though. Cranked some serious heat!
  7. tickbitty

    tickbitty Minister of Fire

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    What part of VA? Saw a 118 in Madison Craigslist. But if there's nothing wrong with your other stove besides the missing ashpan, the Jotul might not really be necessary?
    (I mean, besides the lack of an ashpan)
  8. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
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    Loc:
    NE PA
    You want to burn wood on the bottom, preferably firebrick lined. Wood burns best in a bed of at least 1 inch of ash. Not elevated so air gets through the fire burning it rapidly. Coal stoves must burn on a grate and have an ash pan.
    The Mama and Papa Bear are single door, long narrow stoves much like what you have. They burn to ash in the front, and will have dark spots in the back in the morning. This is the time to empty ash from front. If you do this with door open, with a metal bucket close to the door, the draft will tend to pull any fly ash into the stove. Drag the burning coals and dead charcoal from the back to the front, and it will take right off with little kindling. I've found anything with an ash pan, you're starting off with a new fire all the time and heat output isn't as steady.

    The baffle plate burns a hole through in the center of yours, and the baffle can get shoved towards the rear shoving wood in. Sometimes you need to pull it forward with a bent poker. The single door Fisher's burn similar to yours, but the door and inside is larger to get more into easier. They also have firebrick side and bottom instead of cast iron plates. Yours will warp and desintegrate in time, both taking away from inside space and allowing intense heat to the outer cast shell. But they work good for many years. The Fisher was built as the last stove you will ever buy and will outlast us.

    My neighbor has this exact stove (with Viking printed on door) and I keep it going for him when he's at work. It keeps his gas furnace off, and uses it as his sole heat source. We use the technique mentioned above and it never goes out. Coals build up so deep, he has to open it up and let it burn down many times for more space. So as soon as the front is dead, shovel down to the bottom, and drag ahead. Keeping up with this will keep coals and ash to a minimum for constant burning.

    Mama takes the same length yours does, but it's wider by about 2 inches. Papa takes up to 30", but will drive you out if you don't have a large area. About 2000 sf in PA, about 3000 sf in VA.
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The Jotul Castine (F400) is an EPA stove that has an ashpan and takes 20" logs. The Oslo F500 will take 22".

    You could keep your eye out for a Jotul model 8 with an ashpan on craigslist.

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