1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)
  1. Marsha Cook

    Marsha Cook New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2013
    Messages:
    57
    Loc:
    NH
    I am considering an OAK after reading so many posts in favor of it.

    My stove is on the first floor, vented through the flue. Is it feasible to take the OAK down through the flooring, run across the basement and out - much like the dryer is vented outside?

    Who installs OAKs - plumbers, stove installers, hvac guys?

    Anything else I should look for?

    As usual, thanks for the help.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. iceguy4

    iceguy4 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    1,051
    Loc:
    Upstate, NY
    yes That would be the way I would try who installs OAK's? yes yes and yes. you can describe it well(you did here) and get estimates. what to look for...maybe condensation on cold days.
    Its one of those things that should be done to all burners... good move
  3. P38X2

    P38X2 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,735
    Loc:
    Jaffrey, NH
    I'd look to find an experienced local handyman to do the job. Prob be less expensive. You'll have to use a suitable diameter pipe if it's gonna be a longish run. I'd think sections of 4" dryer duct would fit the bill nicely. Tape up the seams, and yer good to go. As long as your basement isn't heated, you probably won't have to worry about condensation. Make sure your intake isn't in a snow drift prone area and be sure to critter proof it.
    iceguy4 likes this.
  4. Lake Girl

    Lake Girl Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,399
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    Good question. Is there a length on an OAK where it is no longer efficient and has to be upsized to 4" like a exhaust vent? While you are not dealing with fly ash, if it is too long a run does it restrict combustion air if it is too long? May be a question for the manufacturer.
    iceguy4 likes this.
  5. Madcodger

    Madcodger Guest

    Personally, I like (in order of preference): 1) Experienced stove shop that regularly recommends and installs OAKs 2) HVAC person experienced with pellet stoves/boilers/furnaces or at least gas, 3) Any other option, including plumbers or very good handymen.

    It is important that you be able to explain - and that they understand - what an OAK is and does, how it functions, why the connection needs to be well-sealed, why metal is needed, etc.. Too often the criteria becomes, "Can you cut a hole in my house and connect these tubes?" Just make sure they understand air sealing, the dangers of smoke through the OAK without proper draft, etc.
    iceguy4 likes this.
  6. Harvey Schneider

    Harvey Schneider Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    Messages:
    964
    Loc:
    Southbury, CT
    In the PDVC manual it states that an increased diameter is needed if the OAK is longer than six feet or has two or more 90 degree bends.
    At three inches it will have the same air velocity as the vent and the same physics apply to resistance to flow caused by length and bends.
    For my basement install with five feet of OAK and two bends I used metal flexible dryer vent.
  7. Lake Girl

    Lake Girl Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,399
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    Good to know that the diameter should be increased with longer lengths and/or bends - something I never thought of because ours is straight out the wall behind the stove. Physics was a weak point in school (got a "C" when most of my other grades were A & B);em
  8. Marsha Cook

    Marsha Cook New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2013
    Messages:
    57
    Loc:
    NH
    Have read my Harman manual and followed others advice but I cannot find a knockout on the rear panel of my p61A for an oak. The tag on the stove says it is a p61-2. The manual says it is a p61a-2. Any help?
  9. P38X2

    P38X2 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,735
    Loc:
    Jaffrey, NH
    Draw an imaginary line straight out from the intake port behind the angled trim panel. Shine a flashlight on the outside of the panel where your imaginary line would be. You should see the cutout area. Unless something has changed, it's actually only attached to the panel at 3 points and the rest is a VERY thin cut made by, I'm assuming, a laser.
  10. P38X2

    P38X2 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,735
    Loc:
    Jaffrey, NH
    Here's the best pic I could get without moving stuff around. The panel with the warning sticker is the lower right rear panel if you were standing BEHIND the stove. The panel with the cutout is the angled one above that. It's a crappy pic but you can kinda see where the cutout needs to be removed (the arched area in the upper left part of the pic) to allow your OAK pipe to go straight in. Tin snips will helpin cutting the 2 tabs near the edge of the trim panel, then just twist out the middle. I highly suggest you carefully file/sand the cut edges as they will be very sharp.
    IMG_20131226_184632_949.jpg
    newbieinCT likes this.
  11. Marsha Cook

    Marsha Cook New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2013
    Messages:
    57
    Loc:
    NH
    Thank you! I see it now. And understand more with you picture.

Share This Page