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Oak Seasoning

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by mainemac, Jan 11, 2009.

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  1. mainemac

    mainemac Member

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    Oak cut and split May 2008 means OK to burn
    a) Nov 2009
    b) Feb 2010
    c) Nov 2010

    It is in what little sun my shady lawn gets

    Thanks
    Tom

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  2. beau5278

    beau5278 Member

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    Was the tree a live tree,dead or partially dead?
  3. mainemac

    mainemac Member

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    Very Much Alive
  4. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    I'd give it two summers to dry, should be good to burn next Fall.
  5. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    Up in the north, it seems like the going rate is 1.5-2 years. Down here, about a year is plenty and I've had some that was cut/split early in the spring (march) sat through the hot, dry summer, and was ready go that winter.
  6. mtcox

    mtcox Member

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    I think any of the times you posted would work. However, if you can hold off until November 2010 you won't regret it. 2.5 years to season would be heaven to burn.
  7. crazy_dan

    crazy_dan New Member

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    here where I am if it is split and stacked by April in a single row not butted up against anything and in FULL sun it is ready by fall when I need it.
    Another year of being C/S/S (cut/split/stacked) wont hurt it either. my advice do what you have to do to get 2+ years ahead on wood, and just deal with the state of your wood next year.
  8. chipsoflyin

    chipsoflyin Member

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    the white oak i split last feb. ,stacked double row on pallets, in a sunny and very windy location had a moisture reading of 20-22% after splitting again to get true readings this november, the fresh white oak split at the same time had moisture content above 40% (top scale of my meter). seems to me there are alot of variables that go into how well seasoned wood gets per given time period. the oak with the 20-22% readings burns real nice with absolutely no hissing or popping.
  9. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    November 2009
  10. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    I think what crazy dan thinks...even if you buy wood try and stay 2 years ahead. That move will eliminate so many problems associated with wood burning in ain't even funny.
  11. woodconvert

    woodconvert Minister of Fire

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    It makes HYOOGE difference when it's cut as to how much moisture is in it. If you can cut when they are dormant (ie Jan/Feb) there isn't as much moisture in em' as there is in springtime. But if it was cut/split and stacked out in the open where the sun and wind can get at it....I would think it would burn pretty good in Nov 2009. That'll be two summers of drying and one winter. But if you can wait till the following year that'd be some super stuff.

    (I just picked up some red oak that was cut/split and stacked one year ago-ish (Mid Jan I believe). I've burnt some as a test. It actually burns real good with no hiss and a long hot burn time...and, by our standards in Michigan, we had a wet drying season)
  12. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    It depends greatly on the size and length of the splits. The shorter and narrower the quicker.
  13. pulldownclaw

    pulldownclaw Feeling the Heat

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    I loaded up the stove this morning with some red oak I split over a year ago. One of the smaller splits that was 4" or less was hissing a bubbling a little bit out of the end. I haven't seen much of my other stuff doing this, so I was a little surprised, but it is a testament to how long oak takes to dry. Makes me wonder how my holz hausen of oak will burn next year, I finished stacking it in October....
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