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  1. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
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    South Central Indiana
    MrTwoStick,

    Sounds like your wood is dry enough. Big question is is your secondaries firing? Sounds like they should be firing if you can reach the stove temps you mentioned. One thing about these new type stoves if the wood isnt dry your secondaries wont light off in the top of the stove. The moisture in the wood cools the temps and makes it hard to get the secondaries to light off, plus you will have trouble reaching temps like 850 stove top temps. So your wood must be good enough.

    Then the creosote issue. If your keeping your secondaries burning by not closing the air down so far that the secondaries go out then your burning the smoke gases that cause creosote. You wont be building up too much creosote if your keeping the stove going with the air set low enough to still keep the secondaries going.

    How the front glass on the stove is it staying fairly clean?

    What is your stove top temp when you get the stove air shut down for the night? (Say 30 minutes after you get the air shut down for the all night burn what then is the stove top temp?)

    Can you see your secondaries firing up in the top of the stove.

    How long does it take to get the stove top temp up to 400 after reload?

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  2. bluedogz

    bluedogz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2011
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    NE Maryland
    I won't repeat what everyone else has said... but I would ask, why do extra work knowingly? Your logic seems sound to me if you are aware of the shortcomings and risks, but that doesn't make the shortcomings and risks acceptable if we can avoid them.

    I think the "wasting wood" comments come from comparing how much heat you would get out of dry wood versus having to boil the water out of unseasoned stuff.
  3. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
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    1,716
    Loc:
    WNY
    I guess my question is, if you know the downfalls to burning less than seasoned wood, why would you?

    You are wasting wood, heat and adding extra work for yourself as well as adding more risk for injury with needing to climb onto your roof possibly in the snow and ice.

    Of course you CAN heat your home with wood you cut and burn in the same season. I know people that have. One burnt down their house doing it...but they continue the practice because it's what they've always done, in their new rebuilt house (built on the foundation of the old one). He replaced the flue pipe because it smelled like creosote...and the same winter, a chimney fire in the new pipe burned the place down while he was out in the barn. His wife found it while it was involved. Luckily no one was killed, since it happened during the day when no one was in the house. Of course, they feel it was the new pipe that caused the problem, not the fact that they had creo build up or a chimney fire.
  4. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,815
    Loc:
    Michigan

    Welcome to the forum Mrtwostick.

    I must say that for a new member you are a bit brash but that's okay. The way you've worded your post makes me think that no matter what anyone writes you will just laugh it off because you have been doing things one way a long time and are set in your ways and you really don't want to change. However, you asked so I'll answer just a bit anyway.

    Most times when folks burn wood by cutting in the summer or fall and then throwing that wood in the stove, they grew up with the older folks doing it that way (as you've stated in your signature line). One other reason that folks don't put wood up ahead of time is pure laziness and we've seen a lot of that.

    You can burn your stove at 850 but you won't find too many willing to dot that on a regular basis. I do question though that you've been burning 24/7 for the past few weeks though. The Philly suburbs usually don't get quite as chilly as the further northern regions. We live a bit north of you and we certainly are not burning 24/7 yet and the wood stove is our only heat.

    Now, does it matter if you burn less than seasoned wood? Not to me it doesn't and I suspect not too many care and some may even snicker at you out there cleaning your chimney several times per year. However, one must also keep in mind that some areas have already been cracking down on the dirty burning stoves and practices. Let us hope this is not a trend but it could be if folks don't burn cleanly. But then I fail to understand why anyone would not want to burn as clean as possible.

    One of the biggest benefits of cutting, splitting and stacking your wood ahead of time is that good dry wood will simply give you more heat than the wood you cut this fall. The benefit is that you don't have to work as hard if you have good dry wood. The benefit is you don't have to super heat your stove to try to burn the crap out of the chimney. The benefit is you don't have to be out there cleaning your chimney so often. The benefit is you are not polluting the air if you burn good wood.

    Here's one other little thing that we've seen happen so some of our members on hearth.com. What happens if sometime you are struck by a disease or are injured and can not get out to cut your wood? You have none on hand so you either buy wood or have someone come in and cut or however you want to handle the situation. I've preached on this forum that everyone should be 3 years ahead on their wood supply. That alone would take care of the problem if you could not cut wood for a year. It would also assure you of having good dry wood at all times.

    I could go on but it is pointless so will just say, burn your wood the way you wish. If you want to improve, there are many intelligent folks on this forum who will gladly help. If you do not wish to change then I can see no reason for you to post.
    wishlist, Pallet Pete and bluedogz like this.
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Michigan

    You can quote all you wish that you find on the Internet and one can usually find something that will back up a theory.

    Here is one for you to consider. In the past 5 years we have got about a cup of soot from our chimney; no creosote. We cleaned the chimney after running the new stove for 2 full winters. We have not cleaned it since nor does it need cleaning. So is our wood dry? Will our wood being dry cause creosote? If so, we fail to see it. The wood we've burned in this stove has been from 3 to 8 years in the stack after being cut to length and split.

    Sorry, I don't buy it.
  6. Mrtwostick

    Mrtwostick New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
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    Loc:
    Philadelphia suburbs

    Because its all I have and Im not interested in buying a skid of bio bricks etc.
  7. Mrtwostick

    Mrtwostick New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
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    Loc:
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    Brash? I thought we were mostly all men here? I dont mean to be offensive but I think alot of folks aren't willing to admit they burn what they got.
    And yes the Philly Burbs have been rather chilly 30's at night for the last week. I have an uninsulated cinder block house and my wife and Iike heat.
    I did say in my first post that my question might ruffle some feathers. And I agree with you about being ahead on the wood. We already have half of next years wood split. I have maybe 5 cords in rounds that have yet to be split.
  8. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    Soutwest VA
    If it is all you have ya got to do what ya got to do.
  9. bluedogz

    bluedogz Minister of Fire

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    Is that a reason to be a jerk when we're the newest guy to the party? You'll be shocked at the level of support you can get here- a forum member took his own weekend to drive 2 hours to my house to install 27' of chimney liner, because my chimney was unsafe and I was too broke to hire it done, and also, he's just a &%#ing nice guy.

    I'm sure Gamma and Dixie will be along shortly to demonstrate what kinda wimmen keep themselves on the ranch here.

    If we are this adamant in our thoughts, why are we asking for opinions in a forum of enthusiasts? The original question was answered, and it was pointed out that while green wood might be burned safely, it's inefficient, and dangerous if done incorrectly. Lose the chip on the shoulder and you'll get a lot of help here from people who were burning before you were born.
    rideau and corey21 like this.
  10. Mrtwostick

    Mrtwostick New Member

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    Nov 6, 2012
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    Loc:
    Philadelphia suburbs
    Obviously some of you a bit touchy. Thanks to some of you who answered my question. Since Im now a jerk I will use the search engine when I have a question. Personally I really enjoy burning wood but I didn't know it was that serious. Thanks again.
  11. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Doylestown, PA
    Don't know where you got that idea. I readily admit I burn poor quality fuel for the first few years while my heating needs outgrew my wood supply.

    Burning wet wood is completely doable. But, you do get more build up and you do increase your risk of a chimney fire. Also, burning wet wood takes a LOT more effort and shortens your burn times a good deal.

    Burning wood is far more enjoyable when it is dry.
  12. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    No one is trying to be rude but We try to give advise to keep you little safer while you are burning wood.
    rideau likes this.
  13. Jack Straw

    Jack Straw Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,161
    Loc:
    Schoharie County, N Y
    I think the problem is that burning dry wood is our 1st commandment here and you are inadvertently speaking blasphemy
  14. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,580
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Sounds like all that need be said has been said so I will be closing this one up.

    Dry wood is best, but often folks starting out don't have that option. If the wood is not ideal, be careful and watch that flue for buildup. Sweep it once per cord to be on the safe side. Note that if you can figure out how to insulate that block it will make a world of improvement in heating. That block can suck out a good third of the wood heat and radiate outdoors. Insulating the place could save cords of wood burned a year.
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