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Old fireplace

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Joful, Jul 29, 2012.

  1. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Amazingly huge fireplaces! Nice work and pics Joful!

    Ray

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  2. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Thanks, guys.

    As to the size, it's all perspective, I guess. I look at these fireplaces and wonder how anyone could cook in one so small. The dimension from floor to lintel of my two fireplaces is the typical 5 feet for a cooking fireplace, and they're much deeper than typical for the time, one of the two being 4 feet deep, but they're not very wide. Typical fireplaces in the 1700's were either 8 or 10 feet wide, and mine are only 5 feet wide.

    I think BAR has one the size of mine in his summer kitchen, but the one in the main part of the house is over 8 feet wide. Right, BAR?
  3. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    Imagine trying to put enough wood in a 5 ft or 10ft wide fireplace to get any heat out of!! I know these were cooking firplaces, the ones in rooms i guess were much smaller, but that one inthe house was also used for heat in the winter.
  4. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Not so much as you would think. Kitchens were not big back then... barely enough room for food preparation, and maybe a table. Also, the flue in a cooking fireplace is reverse of what you would want for heating, tangent to the back wall, and the front wall sloping in above the lintel to make the throat. I suspect kitchen fireplaces were more likely than not actually designed to throw minimum heat into the room, as having a fire (or three) going 24/7 in the kitchen probably made it warmer than you would want.

    Most old houses around here have smaller fireplaces and/or thimbles in the other rooms, which were the primary source of heat. These smaller fireplaces, I believe, did not typically use the heavy wood lintels found in kitchen fireplaces.
  5. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Milled rabbets on two floor joists this afternoon, prepping to se subfloor for hearth extension. Both joists are hand hewn, one flattened on two sides, and the other squared on all four.

    The one rounded on two sides is a massive oak, nothing unusual for the area and period. However, the squared beam against the front of the fireplace foundation is walnut! I've never seen a walnut structural timber before.
    ScotO likes this.
  6. DianeB

    DianeB Feeling the Heat

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  7. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Thanks, Diane. Not looking for anything particular at the moment, but that made for some great reading and eye candy!
  8. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Walls are stripped and pointed, and now the new brick floor is in and pointed. There was an enormous amount of "behind the scenes" work to make this happen, including moving and leveling some tree trunk-sized floor joists, and one heat pipe that feeds all of our first-floor radiators. Just gotta stain and varnish that breadboard end I installed between the brick and old flooring, seal the brick with something to help give it some polish and age, and then the stove's going in! After that... heat shields.

    Please excuse the mess and spilled mortar mix... been a little crazy here, lately.

    PC210002.JPG PC210001.JPG
  9. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Lookin' good Joful! :)

    Ray
  10. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Looks fantastic, Joful! I spent the entire evening (actually the past TWO evenings) pointing up the stone on my fireplace too. That tuckpoint bag has my forearms sore!!

    2012-12-21_18-49-21_872.jpg
    Joful, Billybonfire, raybonz and 2 others like this.
  11. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    Nice work.
  12. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    One step closer...

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1356321802.348654.jpg
    Billybonfire and raybonz like this.
  13. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Finally got the adaptor Friday, so I was able to get it hooked up and running this weekend. Initial report is that the "new" F12 runs much nicer than the "old" F12. Could be some improvements behind the scenes, in the years between the manufacture of these two stoves, or the extra 10-15 feet of chimney height on the new system. Have only had a few daytime fires, while checking out how everything looks, and baking in the fresh paint. Still gotta get around to varnishing the breadboard end I installed between the old flooring and the new brick floor.

    P1130007.JPG

    In these two photos, you can finally see these wooden "lockers" and beams I've been discussing, and how they sit in relation to the stove:

    P1130009.JPG P1130010.JPG

    Looks like I left a pair of gloves sitting in one of the lockers. There's a wooden beam running front to back above the locker to the left of the stove in the first photo, and the end of what appears to be a piece of an old floor joist poking out along the back wall to the right of the stove (just left of the locker with the gloves). All of these combustables are at 36" or more from the nearest point on the stove, although they are up inside a confined space. Running the stove at 650F for an extended period, I could not get any of the wood around these lockers over 98F. The lintel hit 120F, as did the door jambs, but both of them will likely get heat shields.
    rideau and Billybonfire like this.

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