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Old Growth Fir Log

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by hobbyheater, Aug 12, 2013.

  1. hobbyheater

    hobbyheater Minister of Fire

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    That is one very impressive tree! Looks as though there could be a bear den in the root!

    IMGP4098.JPG

    This area was logged in the 40s. In the picture is the older brother that I hike with.
    ScotO likes this.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    That looks like a very old one. This region had giants so thick that in some areas a man could barely fit between them. Now most are logged off and second or third growth has replaced them. Where we live the whole area was clear cut for ship building. In particular, the local firs made good masts.
  3. Lake Girl

    Lake Girl Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
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    Studies in the 70's showed that mechanical scarification of site is better than slash pile burning (opens serontinous cones); slash pile burning better than other methods or no site prep for regeneration. Hubby used to use skidder with chockers when logging in the early days of marriage (winter job - commercial diver in spring, summer, fall).

    Glad to hear debris used for home heating BTUs;)

    Logging operations can keep dollars local if there are value added industries to support it... sawmills cut dimensional lumber, lumber used to make framing trusses or pre-fab homes. Pulp from poplar to make paper and fibre board. Over a 100 years of history in our area that is only now struggling due to decline in building and paper demand (dang computers).

    Slave Lake would not agree that wildland fires is the way to go:(
    hobbyheater likes this.
  4. hobbyheater

    hobbyheater Minister of Fire

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    100_0558.JPG

    This valley bottom was logged in the late 60s.

    100_0561.JPG

    I operated the loader that loaded the old growth in this setting in the fall of 1979. The second growth is really coming back.
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 2, 2013
    ScotO likes this.
  5. hobbyheater

    hobbyheater Minister of Fire

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    100_0377.JPG
    The following pictures are taken on top of the ridge across the valley just above the right hand corner of the highest slash!

    100_0565.JPG
    Last time we were up here was 25 years ago. It used take 4 to 5 hours to hike to this point, now just an hour.

    100_0582.JPG
    Miniature alpine !

    100_0583.JPG
    We discovered this little jewel from some 40 years back when our hobby was flying.

    100_0587.JPG
    Rat Terriers' first venture into the alpine and it even rained a bit. Surprisingly it did not bother them at all.

    100_0588.JPG

    This area was loaded with ripe low bush blue berries and the pack did a lot of grazing.
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 2, 2013
    ScotO and Joful like this.
  6. DevilsBrew

    DevilsBrew Minister of Fire

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    My dad was with a group of owners that refused to clear cut. Times have changed and money rules. I still get the Healthy Forest lecture once a year.
  7. hobbyheater

    hobbyheater Minister of Fire

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    On the steep side hills pictured across the valley, it is some very good size timber with very little understory trees. If you were to try and selective log that ground, at the end of 50 years of selective logging, you would end up with a clear cut. Those big trees when they hit the ground, they will not stay in one spot on ground that steep.
    There are places, if the wood is high quality, they will single stem log with a helicopter. A faller goes a measured distance up the tree and takes the top off and then goes to the bottom of the tree and leaves just enough wood holding that the tree still stands but when the chopper gets a hold of the tree with the grapple, it will break off at the stump and be flown to a landing.
    The area across the valley is hemlock and balsam fir which is a low grade wood and would not pay the cost of the chopper.
    Next time I'm up in that area, I will take some pictures for you.
    ScotO likes this.
  8. DevilsBrew

    DevilsBrew Minister of Fire

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    The pictures reminded me of my dad and his lumber business is all. It would be cool to see your pictures.
    hobbyheater likes this.
  9. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Love the pics and the stories with them, Hobbyheater! Keep 'em coming....

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