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Old Lopi Wood Insert

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by JudyGG, Jan 18, 2006.

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  1. JudyGG

    JudyGG New Member

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    Jan 18, 2006
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    We have an old (probably 20 years) black Lopi wood burning insert that has two doors with glass panes. It has two small vents on the bottom, a slide vent across the top of the doors, and a top vent. This stove consistently pours smoke into the house, especially on windy days. Last year we put in a new liner which did not help. We replace the cord around the doors at least twice a year. It is a good stove, heats well and can hold a ton of wood. However, the smoke is a problem. Sometimes it can be seen leaking from the two bottom vents and other times it seems to leak from the glass panes in the doors. It also builds up a lot of creosote, more than I have seen anywhere else. Any thoughts?

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  2. JudyGG

    JudyGG New Member

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    Not sure how tall the chimney is. The liner is not insulated but does go up the entire chimney. Passageways are clear. It has always been a problem. Originally we did not have the metal liner and when we put it in we were told it would fix the problem. It hasn't. The stove seems to build up creosote only towards the front of the box. Thanks, Judy
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Judy I admit of not being familliar with every brand and model stove. But I think 20 plus year stove just might have
    a lot of air leaks. If cast iron many seams are glued together with refactory cement . With heat and aging process
    these seams will need to re done. This entails total dissesembly then re essembly. applying new refractory cement to
    all the seams. The front door glass leaking is probably a gasket issue. Again compressed and aged over time. Some
    glass configurations consist of two panes with gasket material in the middle. Gasketing the door may not address the
    window area. If your stove is leaking that much that means air is escaping and not channeled into your flue. I will
    create the cresote situation you described. If not into rebuilding it then consider after 20 years it has served its purpose

    The other factors others mentioned is your chimney situation. If you live in a ranch and do not have enough verticle
    distance no stove will draft correctly. 20 years old when was the last time the stove was totally cleaned? I mean soot ash
    could have accumulated in a cavity and is blocking your draft, damper area, or inlet air passages. Anyone of these would
    weaken the draft
  4. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Casper Wyoming
    What temp are you burning the stove? Describe your light up procedure and burning habits. Probably have it checked out by a sweep. Does it smoke all the time or is it weather dependant?
  5. gawebster

    gawebster Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
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    Most of the questions asked by other Forum members are good to consider. I'd also look at these questions.

    How long have you ownered the insert? Did it always smoke, or did it just recently start to have the smoke problem.

    Did you do any remodeling within the house recently, add a bathroom, put in new windows, or reinsulate doors and windows. All these can change the negitive pressure within a home. It maybe a problem of insufficent air transfer within the home that is causing the downdraft (smoke) problem in your chimney.

    Just a few more things to look at.

    Gary
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