1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Old stove into basement

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by OhioBurner©, Nov 11, 2012.

  1. OhioBurner©

    OhioBurner© Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    686
    Loc:
    Central Ohio
    So I have my old stove going into the basement since I'm going to be working down there a lot through the winter, maybe even setting up a bedroom down there.

    Its cement floor and an existing chimney that’s all block, so the only clearance issue is with the floor beam and as per my previous post I'll have to shield that since the thimble is like 9" below the main beam (PO ran it like that since early 90's!). But other than that is there anything else I need to do? I can just set it on the floor, hook up 8" single wall to thimble, and plug the fan in right? Obviously I need to do some cleaning. I have started clearing out all the stuff around the area in the pic (took the pic before that). Its going in place of the wood furnace that’s down there now (I'll have to close the holes in the ducts).
    [​IMG]
    ^replacing the red furnace

    with this (old pic before removing a year ago):
    [​IMG]

    Oh and its a masonry chimney, 8x12 flue with a 8" round thimble, and the stove has an 8" collar. I don’t know exactly but the chimney is probably about 30' tall.

    Anything else I am missing? Just double checking, I have this coming week off, and plan to do the swap then.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. OhioBurner©

    OhioBurner© Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    686
    Loc:
    Central Ohio
    Just bumping this back to the top to make sure there isn't something I am forgetting before I install it. And to post pictures of course! I have some of these in other threads but going to consolidate them all to this one, since this thread will be my installation.

    First off, we replaced the old beast in the above pic with this new Shelburne we got at flood-damaged special pricing ;)
    [​IMG]

    After one year, it seems to be just a tad undersized for our needs, but it is working. Still learning it though, and a lot of our wood last year wasn't as seasoned as it should have been.

    [​IMG]
    The old stove spent a whole year sitting on the porch until we figured out what to do with it.

    [​IMG]
    Here is a rig I built for hoisting stuff into and out of the basement. Doubled 2x4 beams with 2x6 crosses. The pipe that holds the winch is probably the weak link, might have to go up a size, but didn't want to bore out to big of a hole in the 2x4's. but it does deflect a bit... The winch is a bit undersized itself, HF 440# hoist, I mainly use it to hang deer. Wish I would have bought the next size up. Used big lag screws for everything except supplemental nails in the 2x4 beams to laminate them together, and in the center of the crosses.

    [​IMG]
    My home built 30cuft trailer was about the perfect size and height for taking the stove off the porch and rolling it right onto this platform.

    [​IMG]
    Once airborne I slid the platform out from under it, and let the hoist lower it down.

    The stove must be over 440#, the hoist couldn't lift it on its own. I had to throw another strap on it, looped over the pipe, and a little supplemental arm strength and got it moving. When it comes time to hoist out the furnace, I may need to get a bigger hoist. I'm guessing its even heavier.

    Rest of the install this evening or tomorrow probably.
  3. Stegman

    Stegman Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Messages:
    314
    Loc:
    Sterling, MA
    Can't help with any of your questions, but that's a pretty cool rig you built for getting it down into the basement. Nice work.
  4. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2009
    Messages:
    368
    Loc:
    East TN.
    Ditto on the cool A frame rig! Did you get the stove hooked up yet? What kind is it with those fins on the side?
  5. OhioBurner©

    OhioBurner© Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    686
    Loc:
    Central Ohio
    No, not hooked up yet. the big square duct coming from the propane furnace is right there at the same level as the top of the thimble so I am going to have to do like a 45 angle right off the thimble, and then another 45 at the stove. My 8" piping I was using on this stove before (not the 6" like the previous owner had it in the second pic - no clue why he did that) I just had one 90. So I have to run to the store yet, oh and I've lost the bolts that hold the blower on in the move, need to buy some more bolts. But hopefully I'll finish it soon.

    No clue on the stove. It had a tag on it that was painted over black. [​IMG] Looks like small company deal, its pretty much all square with straight lines, all steel, like something a basic shop could build easily. Pretty huge firebox.

    It worked alright though, threw out plenty of heat, but made lots of creosote. I'll have to clean my chimney a couple times throughout the season. It needs a fresh coat of paint and it would look a lot nicer. Was toying with the idea of trying to fabricate up a secondary burn tube setup in it, and even a glass door with primary air coming in over the glass, instead of the two screwy things on each side. But this is such a huge stove I'm not sure how that would effect the performance of a secondary burn system, and it would be a whole lot of work for nothing if I screw it up. It heats fine, just is a creosote machine and I dont like the spiny air knobs on the sides.
  6. jjs777_fzr

    jjs777_fzr Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2007
    Messages:
    303
    Loc:
    NorthShore, MA USA
    Nice rig and slide platform - even nicer looking stove - looks gorgeous (the new one).
    I think that's considered a Federal style design.
  7. OhioBurner©

    OhioBurner© Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    686
    Loc:
    Central Ohio
    Thanks JJ, yeah that Shelburne wasn't even on my list of stoves I had been debating for over a year. But when we saw it, and it looked so nice, and a $1000 off, we took a chance. Wish it was just a tad bigger.

    I did get the old furnace out of the way...

    [​IMG]
  8. Motor7

    Motor7 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2009
    Messages:
    368
    Loc:
    East TN.
    I have an old Buck copy in my shop and think I am going to add secondary burn tubes to it. Really, it's only one hole that can easily be covered if it doesn't work. Nothing to lose but time.....::-)
    Dune likes this.
  9. OhioBurner©

    OhioBurner© Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    686
    Loc:
    Central Ohio
    Yeah one hole at the min, but cutting all the tubes to length, drilling the little holes, rigging it up to stay up on top... But the bigger project would be converting the door to glass so you could see it (might be hard to make use of the secondary burn if you can't really see it to tell if its working), and switching the primary air from my side ports to a front air wash. The burn tubes would be the easiest part perhaps, but if I am going to do it, I'm going to do it right! If I get a little more serious about that I'll start another thread for the mod maybe.

    I have the blower mounted and the stove in place and venting hook up. Got to rig up a heat shield on the overhead floor beam and I'll be ready to warm the basement up. Oh and I got to go back to the hardware store forgot to get caps for the open ducting now were the furnace ties into it.

    Edited to add: Just got back from two hardware stores. I guess they only sell caps in 6" round around here, so not sure what the best way to cap off the 7" and 8" holes I got. Might have to cut something out and tape it, I guess, or just tape it.
  10. OhioBurner©

    OhioBurner© Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    686
    Loc:
    Central Ohio
    Its ready for lite off but probably wont fire it up for a while, since its been a little warm lately. Anyway, just thought I'd follow up with a 'done' picture.

    That stove would look so much better with some fresh paint. Never painted a stove, but maybe I'll give it a try. Then again it is in the basement. All the more orangey rust is new from it sitting on the front porch all year, stovepipe included. My fault.

    [​IMG]

    I ended up just taping up the opening still in the ducts. Used some scrap black stovepipe trimmings to make the heat shield for the floor beam. I didnt even think about it before hand, but there is a floor drain by the front right leg, its just out of view in the pic but the small pvc pipe is the drain for the furnace and also for the water softener. Is pvc pipe, or the plastic (pvc?) floor drain considered a combustible?
  11. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2005
    Messages:
    1,659
    Loc:
    northern massachusetts
    that pipe where it is prob won't get hot enough to even bend. i bet it stays cool. great lift you got there. looks like something i used to use to swap engines in cars.
  12. BIGDADDY

    BIGDADDY Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    Messages:
    356
    Your ingenuity admired here.
  13. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,030
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    They make end caps for the duct terminations: http://www.theductshop.com/shop/catalog-caps-c-1_13.html

    I don't think the drain pipe will be an issue. Watch the temps on the joist to be sure the heat shield is adequately doing its job. Repainting is pretty easy, but you will really want good exhaust ventilation and a vapor mask. Otherwise it will totally stink up the house and may rot some brain cells too. Stove paint is pretty nasty stuff.

    PS, what happened to the side radiation fins?
  14. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    6,946
    Loc:
    N.E. Penna
    If repainting, I highly recommend using the brush on high heat paint instead of the spray on.

    pen
  15. OhioBurner©

    OhioBurner© Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    686
    Loc:
    Central Ohio
    Yeah I know they make the end caps, they just didnt have any locally. Looks like I'd be about $40 from your link for the two I need. I might order some if I want it to look nicer but I'm not worried atm. The metal duct tape is doing fine.

    As for painting, its about 10' from the outside door and there are a couple more small windows down there, so should be good.

    Not sure what you mean about the fins? (nothing has happened to them I dont think)

    Pen - brush on sure would take a lot longer, especially with the aforementioned fins, but I assume you mention it because it works better?
  16. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    6,946
    Loc:
    N.E. Penna
    After spraying a few and brushing a few, the brush on (from the same brand, Rustoleum) has held up much better, plus the spray on is a very dusty spray paint. It won't take you that long at all.

    pen
  17. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Sounds like the spray on is mixed wrong for the conditions at the time. Wonder if you'd get even better results by thinning the brush on for HVLP application?
  18. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,030
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    The angle of the photo and lighting made the fins almost disappear. Looked again and now I see them.

Share This Page