1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Old Wood/Coal Stove Turning White

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Knight63, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. Knight63

    Knight63 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2012
    Messages:
    16
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Hello Everybody, as the title says my cook stove has been getting whiter since the first time I used it last summer. It hasn't really concerned me much until I saw in an older thread that it could be from overheating. I have only been burning wood in it. My dad is bringing home a thermometer from work today so I can check the temperature. So what is a good temperature range for a cook stove like this? Also, if anyone has any information about this stove I would appreciate it. Its a Jacobs Mfg. New Victor. Thanks. 100_0177.JPG 100_0178.JPG

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    14,952
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    Pic number two clearly indicates an over fire. When white or ash color appears on cast, that means it is getting pretty darn hot. I would try to keep the body of the stove south of 650F. The cook top may/may not throw off the temp readings depending on how it is built. Get the thermo and get some facts.
  3. Knight63

    Knight63 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2012
    Messages:
    16
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Thanks for the response! I tried out the thermometer and tried to keep it under 650F to see how well the stove cooks. The stove top cooked decently, but the oven wasn't anywhere near baking temperature. I will have to do some more experimenting.
  4. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Messages:
    706
    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    Is your flue connected or just leaning on top of the outlet?

    Are you sure that stove was meant for wood and coal? It looks like a coal stove. Wood, in a stove that is designed for coal with under-fuel air, will burn fast and hot.

    I would redo the installation and tighten up the air leaks. With air moving slowly through the stove it will heat the oven better and more evenly. Also, if it is a dual fuel stove, see if there is a way to close the under fuel air supply when burning wood. Coal needs air under the fire, wood usually likes the air from the top.

    KaptJaq
  5. Knight63

    Knight63 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2012
    Messages:
    16
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I'm pretty sure it is meant for wood too because it has a door on the side of the firebox. The flue is not connected. It just sits on top of the outlet. Thanks!
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    47,486
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    It looks to me to be a coal stove with a riddling grate. That is going to put air under the fire. It's definitely been overfired. Are you using the oven bypass damper once the stove top is warmed up?

    Also, is the stove flue temporarily disconnected? Tell me it is not run with the flue connection setup that way.
  7. Knight63

    Knight63 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2012
    Messages:
    16
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Most of the damper is missing from the stove. Here's a picture (the bottom of the picture is closest to the cooktop). Can anyone tell me how many pieces I am missing? The one piece that is there is connected to the handle. Yes, the flue just sets on the stove. I am still waiting to come across the proper adapter. I guess I will have to order one. The stove is just in a pole barn, not in a house. Thanks

    100_0179.JPG
  8. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,506
    Loc:
    NE PA
    The two lids with removable centers for smaller pans are usually over the firebox. One to boil water with center removed, and one for cooking with center removed. The correct pan will have a smoke ring to seal to stove, but not necessary. You have to stay with the food, moving it almost all the time. It cooks fast and will burn quick. Almost like a stir fry.

    The top is normally seasoned like a cast iron pan with cooking oil. It should be wire wheeled and sanded smooth down to clean metal, and a few fires with oil each time applied until a black coating forms from the oil. Oil again when not in use for long storage periods.
    Reconditioning top;
    KQ Reconditioning Top 6.JPG Back and Rails Installed w stainless hdwr..JPG

    Seasoning top first fire 3.JPG Seasoning top after first fire. Yes, it's smokey when seasoning.

    If it flakes or wears off in spots, reoil. Once seasoned, you will smell it if it gets too hot.

    If the base isn't baked enamel, stove black is used when cold. Usually once weekly when allowed to cool to clean circulation area around oven. (you need to wire wheel the firebox area before stove blacking)

    It should have a working damper in the pipe.

    Ace Hardware has oval adapters.
    The oven isn't going to work right with an air leak into chimney. That is the only thing keeping it from overheating with 1/2 damper. Cool air rushing in kills draft, slowing air coming into fire. Overnight, or when done cooking in warmer weather, you can tilt one of the lids near the exhaust to allow air up the stack to slow the fire.

    You're not going to get the proper circulation around oven with the air leak at pipe connection. The proper draft is required to pull the heat around the oven. My oven runs about 300 with a normal fire. Pulling the circulator lever brings it up, and is easy to control. Small wood when using oven for higher heat. You will find they bake better than a gas or electric oven since there is little to no air flow. There is no vent like in a modern oven, so keep your face back when opening door. Steam will rush out depending on what you're cooking. Things also won't burn since the humidity is higher in the oven. It will cook faster, and not brown things like you're used to.
  9. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,506
    Loc:
    NE PA
  10. Knight63

    Knight63 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2012
    Messages:
    16
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Thanks very much for all the advice!
  11. bobmwsc

    bobmwsc New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Messages:
    39
    Loc:
    central Mass
    coaly, just wondering what temp you bake cat at?

Share This Page