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organizing firewood

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by woodslinger, Mar 31, 2009.

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  1. woodslinger

    woodslinger New Member

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    southern ill
    Do you guys organize your wood pile in such a fashion that you seperate seasoned from green? I just stack it all together but keep track of what is seasoned and ready to burn and what will need time? Do you stack species together? Just curious how other folks do it.
    How much wood do you keep ready? (3-5 cords or more or less)

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  2. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Anderson, Indiana
    I just keep making hay when the sunshines and pile it as high as i can throw (4 cords now 8-10 more on one job to be done yet)
  3. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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    When I have different species, I do keep them separate as much as possible but don't get too anal about it. I keep 6-8 cords in varying degrees of seasoning.
  4. waynek

    waynek Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2009
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    Loc:
    Southern WI
    In the main woodshed I split the wood in half...seasoned on one side of the shed and un-seasoned on the other. Wood species is mixed together..oak, hickory, elm and black locust.

    Also, I have a smaller shed where I keep my "perfume" wood. Apple, Black cherry and Paper birch all mixed together. This wood is used mainly in the fireplace.
    Jackpine
  5. rphurley

    rphurley Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    Central/Eastern CT
    Next year's wood is stacked in the yard and the following season is out in the woodshed. All species are mixed together, buy I do know where the Oak and Maple are. Oak for those overnight burns and Maple I'll burn during the daytime.
  6. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1 Minister of Fire

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    I keep green stuff separate from seasoned. I also stack hardwood separate from softwood. Like, I'll put oak, cherry, locust, hickory, ash, and such all together, but I keep boxelder, sycamore, and walnut separate.
  7. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    I keep my shoulder season junk woods separate from the way bigger mixed hardwood pile.
  8. burntime

    burntime New Member

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    Aug 18, 2006
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    C'mon hunting season!
    I keep the oak seperated, usually the ash with it or hickory. The rest is the "other" stuff ;-P
  9. Backroads

    Backroads Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
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    Loc:
    Richmond, RI
    Seasoned One Stack----------------------------->Green Another Stack

    As for species, I try to keep a little seperated but don't go overboard.
  10. North of 60

    North of 60 Minister of Fire

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    I mix my dry pine and dry spruce with my dry pine and dry spruce. Some times a dry piece of that darned dry poplar will get in there. On the cold nights Ill mix in some dry pine and dry spruce. Sometimes some dry poplar will get in with the mix. Yes I know Im pretty anal. :red: :lol:
  11. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Next year I will divide my woodshed into 5 sections. 2 rows at each end, 5 rows in the middle, and in-filled in between. I will lay up the middle section so that if I use up more than half, I'm still into well seasoned wood. I don't put green wood directly into the shed. It first lays out in the sun to season.
  12. jadm

    jadm New Member

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    colorado
    It had taken me several years to get a good set up for my stacks that give easy access to the longest seasoned stacks first...no more moving wood twice which my children really appreciate..

    If I tried to explain it without a picture I would drive myself nuts and wouldn't want to do the same to you so all I will say is what I already said above. ;-)
  13. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    I stack mine in holz hausen, and mix species together. At any time there will be one HH under construction, and any wood I scrounge is added to it. When it is done, I start another. I will burn them in the order that I built them, at least one year and I hope two years after I built the thing, so whether the wood was green or dry when I stacked it, it should be dry when I burn it. In order to separate species or separate green from partly seasoned I'd have to have more than one HH under construction, I would never finish any of them, and wouldn't know which wood to burn first.
  14. caber

    caber New Member

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    Western Maryland
    I separate the slow burning hardwoods and the quick burning (poplar). Then I stack directional. Wood to the right is most seasoned, less as you move to the left. I used to keep it all in my head and by sight, but my wife doesn't enjoy my "intellectual challenge" of picking the proper wood for each burn. Like choosing the right wine for a meal. Hmmmmmm..... it's 27, but it will be warming up to 60 degrees. The house is currently at 66 and it is 5 am. Need it warm, but not too hot. I'm thinking a couple well seasoned medium sized poplar splits to get some really quick heat, topped by a large hardwood for a longer soft heat. Not an oak, that would be a waste. Maybe a maple or birch.... no..... a walnut. Yes! Ahhhh the joys of woodburning. The wife would rather just grab what's on the porch and light it up.
  15. Scrounger

    Scrounger Member

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    Loc:
    Rockford, MI
    I keep seasoned and green seperate and also keep each species seperate.
  16. Hurricane

    Hurricane Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Central NJ
    I keep seasoned and green separate, but mix all of my species together.
  17. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    I tag and serial number each split, then stack according to wood density (with a rockwell tester) and moisture content. During the burning season, I calculate the amount of BTUs needed per given load along with duration needed, then select splits accordingly using my computer driven inventory control software.

    Doing it any other way is simply wrong and not maximizing on the heating potential of the wood.

    Yeah-----right! :coolsmirk:
  18. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Most times we'll just stack it all together but have done a little sorting occasionally. We never mix green with dry though. We keep 20+ cords on hand usually.
  19. ramonbow

    ramonbow Member

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    Loc:
    S. Minnesota
    I have been separating live cut and dead cut wood and grouping them to "dense wood" stacks (oak, ash, elm) and "light wood" stacks (boxelder, basswood, aspen). I also picked up a pickup load of free spruce rounds that will go in a "special" pile. I have a lot of room to stack and like the flexibility of having a whole stack of similar species and dryness.
  20. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Mine finds it easier to adjust the thermostat to her liking.
    I took care of that though. Turned off the gas valve, and the power for the blower. Killed the pilot.
    It's all good now.
  21. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Would that be barcode or RFID?
  22. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    RFID - its quicker for my Inventory Control Module.
  23. caber

    caber New Member

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    then all you need is some robotics, conveyor system and software. Just lay in bed, punch in your requirements, and watch it feed your woodstove.
  24. stejus

    stejus Minister of Fire

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    Two years worth of wood (about 9 cords total) each separated so I don't get confused what is seasoned the longest. Right now I have my 2009/2010 piles and working on my 2010/2011 piles now.
  25. dvellone

    dvellone Feeling the Heat

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    449
    I organize my rows so that the less dense hardwoods are the first to be accessed and burned from first fires through December, the better quality hardwoods are in the rows that I'm getting to about late December through February, and again the less dense in the later rows for March and April. It works out ok and I wouldn't bother but I have plenty red maple and cherry that's easily accessible. This year I was into my nicest hard maple and the temps shot up, while for a spell earlier on I was into cherry during a deep cold snap.
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