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Orlan EKO Boilers

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by solarguy, Jan 14, 2008.

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  1. solarguy

    solarguy New Member

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    Loc:
    southern, nh
    I've noticed many of you are using the EKO boilers & I'm thinking
    of getting one. I've had a Tarm Boiler in one home, a Central Boiler
    at this home. I've been happy w/ both products but I'm getting tired of
    the wood consumption w/ the Central. The EKO has a larger firebox & a better
    control system than a Tarm so, how do you like them & what is your average burn time? Any issues to be concerned about?

    Thanks

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  2. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Welcome to the Boiler Room, solarguy.

    I bought mine primarily because I live in the village and have neighbors, so I wanted to be able to burn wood without smoke. It does that very well. The burned smoke provides a lot more heat for wood burned, so lower wood consumption is another major benefit. And unlike my previous boiler, which smoked like crazy and burned a lot of wood, the EKO 60 is able to more than keep up with my large heatload, so it's possible to keep the house above 70 when it's below zero for extended periods. I have a pretty good hot water storage strategy and everything I need to get it going, but haven't done it yet. It works fine without storage, but would be even better with it, I suspect.

    I can only comment on the EKO because it's the only gasifier I've used, and only for a few months, but the Tarm, BioMax and Econoburn (lower banner) are comparable boilers, and I think they're all pretty high quality machines. The technology is impressive, but deceptively simple. Cozy Heat (top banner) has pricing listed for the EKO line. We have owners of all four brands represented here in the Boiler Room, so you can research them all to your heart's content.

    One nice thing about the EKOs is the mechanical heat exchanger cleaner, which moves the turbulators up and down in the heat exchanger tubes to keep them free of soot and ash. I know the BioMax has that as well, and possibly the Econoburn, but I don't think the Tarm does, although they do offer stationary turbulators as an option. The EKO controller has a programmable "puff" feature that keeps the coals live during extended idle periods. Not sure about the others, though again, I don't think Tarm does.
  3. solarguy

    solarguy New Member

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    Loc:
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    Eric

    Thanks for the postive feedback, you seem pleased with your unit.
    I'm planning on a EKO 40 here mainly because the 60 poses some
    rigging problems associated with getting it into the basement.

    Just curious, EKO claims 8-12 hour burn time, what has been your average?

    Thanks!
  4. Nofossil

    Nofossil Moderator Emeritus

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    I can't comment on the Tarm from any first-hand experience. I'd say that the 'fit and finish' on the EKO is closer to the utilitarian end of the spectrum than the elegant end. No functional issues for me, and I think performance is similar.

    If you're not a real hard-core DIY person, then proximity and quality of dealer service / support might be more important. For instance if you needed a replacement fan, which one would be more likely to be in stock?

    I think Tarm has a better warranty. There was a huge price difference when I got my EKO, which made it easy for me to decide.
  5. tuolumne

    tuolumne New Member

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    Now living in VT, and building new home in VT
    The price difference now seems less than it was a few years ago. EKO 40 with the new controller was $6500 and the Tarm Solo 40 was $6895 + $275 for their controller. Most other accessories are the ame. If you're in NH, Tarm is right next door. The EKO dealer I used stocks used propane tanks which was a huge help since I had trouble finding them locally. It was also within striking distance for me to pick up the equipment and save any freight charges. I am hoping to buy the rest of my equipment online as I figure out the parts and pieces.
  6. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I don't have storage hooked up yet, so I don't fill my firebox all the way up, except when it's below zero. Nofossil has storage and a much smaller boiler, and he can get by with firing his up every other day when it's not bitterly cold out. I get 8 hours easily. I would get a lot more with storage and full fireboxes.

    I think the Tarm has a 20-year warranty. The EKO and Econoburn are both 5 years. I'm not sure about the BioMax, which is a similar design.

    The EKO has some bells and whistles that the Tarm lacks, but I believe the mfg quality of the Tarm is pretty high, as nofossil stated. I haven't seen one, but the Econoburn is supposed to be a really well made boiler as well. That said, I'm very happy with the fit and finish of the EKO. I think any one of those mentioned would be a good choice. And there are other designs (Garn, Greenwood, Seton, etc.) that are worth a look.

    Who did you buy the boiler and tanks from tuolumne?
  7. verne

    verne Member

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    Tuolumne, what dealer did you use? Im guessing its in VT
  8. barnartist

    barnartist Minister of Fire

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    solarguy, I have a 60, plan on a closer to 8 hour burn. If you get longer its a bonus. I like mine over all, but realize there is a science to correctly piping the whole thing to get the best out of it. You need storage of some kind, or you will have to be there to reload the boiler when its out of wood. I have barely enough storage and it will keep my house warm several hours after the wood is used up. Start cutting/acquireing next years wood now. and double the amount you think you need, or you will be burning wet stuff by late winter. And the 40 is probably big enough for you, Im not even sure what your heating.
  9. tuolumne

    tuolumne New Member

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    Now living in VT, and building new home in VT
    Alternative Heating of North America or ahona.com. I've had a great experiance. Mark works with Dave at Cozy Heat and Zennon at New Horizon. They are in Burlington Flats, New York which is about 3 hours from our home. He has 500 and 1000 gallon tanks stockpiled; I'm not sure if the prices are fixed or not, but I paid 630 each for the 500 gallon tanks. I 1000 gallon would have been 1200 something.
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