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Pacific Energy Super 27 vs. Lopi Endeavor

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by isipwater, Jul 14, 2013.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Nor the freestanding PE. We only used the blower a few times last winter.

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  2. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    I don't use or desire a blower (freestanding Super) but some people like to use them to get more air convection heat from it. It probably helps to get some heat into the room on a cold morning for example but at the expense of some radiant heat.
  3. MarkinNC

    MarkinNC Minister of Fire

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    I looked at your stove placement in your original post. We have a Lopi Endeavor and we have been very happy with it. I would point out that I am not sure it will work well for you with the proposed installation location. I did want to point out the Lopi is convective stove with most of the heat output coming out of the front of the stove. The heat output off the back and sides of the stove is pretty minimal. If you put the stove in one of the corners of the room (like the lower left corner of the diagram), it would push the heat from one end of the house to the other. The convection really does work and I pointed our Endeavor towards our hallway leading to the far end of the house and it really works.

    Now if the PE stove is more radiant, as opposed to convective and heat shielded like the Endeavor, I think that may heat your home better for you, at least in the current installation location. Just a thought...

    The other thing I have started to recommend is to make a cardboard cutout duplicating the dimensions of the stoves your looking at. Then lay them out on the floor with the appropriate clearances. We were able to tuck the Endeavor tightly into a corner owing to its close clearances and that worked good for us.
  4. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    I like that idea. Maybe I would cut out the clearances that need to be observed and just paint an area inside that the stove will be. This way you can easily check how much room the stove will really need. (for better understanding: Stove 20 inches wide with 6 inch clearances either side => 32 inches total width; depth accordingly)
  5. madison

    madison Minister of Fire

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    Example in thread in my signature
  6. sticks

    sticks Member

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    To me I see as much sheilding on the PE as the Lopi . Maybe part of the top but that is about it. Very seldom have an issue with noise on Lopi woodstove. Biggest issue is making sure the thermodisc makes good contact for the blower to come on. My bias is showing I know. What can I say I am a Lopi guy through and through.
    webby3650 likes this.
  7. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    Huh. I've heard the blower on the Liberty at the stove shop, and it was really quiet.....
    webby3650 likes this.
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    That's what I would expect from a Lopi. Unfortunately the Lopis I have seen are blowerless.
  9. MarkinNC

    MarkinNC Minister of Fire

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    FWIW we stopped using our blower on the Endeavor. The convective feature works just fine and I like it more quiet. Our blower is not loud and does not vibrate. if one were to turn it all the way up to high, that would be loud.

    I guess we do turn it on when our kiddos get out of the bath or shower. They love to get dressed in front of the wood stove.
  10. Treacherous

    Treacherous Minister of Fire

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    I can't speak for stove without bypass but I will say cleaning my Endeavor's pipe from the bottom with Sooteater is maybe a 20-30 minute task from start to finish. It's very easy to go in through the stove. I have 12:12 raised metal seam roof so no plans to go up on top for cleaning.
  11. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    Cleaning the stove or the pipe? I can't find the original comment for context, just the reply above me. Anyway...the stove isn't that hard, no ash pan but I don't think thats much of a deal breaker. In use, push the good coals to the side and get the ashes on that side out, then move the coals to the cleaned out side and get those ashes. The once a year big clean up-scoop out as much ash as you can, then remove the bricks, bottom first, then sides then top. Wire brush everything you can reach (and get dirty), then put everything back, lol. Stack probably depends on setup-ours is a straight run, so easy enough from below or above. Biggest pita is getting the top bricks and the braces they sit on in and out around the tubes, but that's not really that difficult.

    I can't find the video I took of the rattle. I'll do it again come burn season I guess. We are no where near a stove shop, so it's like pulling chicken teeth to get someone out to listen to it when it's running, since obviously they aren't going to make any $$ on the deal (or maybe it's because the two "local" shops are owned by the same person and are words I can't post on a family friendly forum-which is another good possibility). Can't just bring it in, and it's usually not too bad when it first gets going so it's not as easy as holding a lighter to the snap disc to test it. We use the blower to help move the heat down a narrow hallway to the other half of the house. Personally I'd rather shut the dang thing off than listen to it...even typing this I can hear it in my head...that droning rattle...ugh.
  12. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    Edit post isn't working for some weird reason...it pops up but I can't click on the text...

    Anyway, about the cleaning-there's a breakdown of how the bricks, etc all go together in the owners manual which you can get off of the Lopi site. Should show how relatively easy it is to take apart to clean/access the stack.
  13. WoodMan33

    WoodMan33 New Member

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    Can you actually loose heat by using the blower with the wood stove? Would a house fan make more sense?
  14. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    You won't loose any heat. It kinda depends on the stove to me, my blaze king did great with the blower. It made the stove in my opinion.
    But, moving air around with a fan is still a must if you are trying to heat the whole house.
  15. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    No, the same amount of heat gets transferred, it's just the difference between convection (heating the air directly) and radiant heat. Mostly a matter of personal preference. I like the radiant feel, so I don't want a blower, but many like them. Inserts tend to need them more, especially if they are on an outside wall.
  16. Treacherous

    Treacherous Minister of Fire

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    I was referring to cleaning the pipe. Nothing to remove just pull the handle and let the Sooteater crawl its way up.

    EDIT: I do remove the door :)

  17. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    We remove all of it to get to the buildup behind/under the bricks, etc. I covered the bottom (floor?) of the stove with ash and junk from all the nooks and crannies yesterday.
  18. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    Depends on the size of the house, lol.
  19. Treacherous

    Treacherous Minister of Fire

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    I haven't noticed much buildup on top of baffle so haven't bothered to clean up there yet. I may check next year though. I just scoop out as much ash as I can from firebox and call it a day for the annual cleaning.
  20. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    Coming from a one no furnace guy to another, I can agree with that! But I prefer to move cold air into the stove room, it's a more even temperature throughout the house.
  21. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    It's easier to move cold air than warm air. The best success seems to be from putting a small fan on the floor at the peripheral rooms and blow the cold air out. Warm air will flow in above it.
    webby3650 likes this.
  22. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    We don't really have room for a fan on the floor...Our house is a rectangle, but the inside is set up like an H. One "leg" of the H is the living room, the other leg is the dining room and kitchen which are open to each other and the - is the hallway between (on either side of the - are the bedroom and bathroom). The hallway is rather narrow-you can't fit a fridge down it (long story...but we tried to move our VERY heavy vintage fridge from the livingroom where it was easier to unload it into the kitchen that way...and it never even could have dreamed of fitting down there) so there's no floor space for a fan that wouldn't be immediately knocked over when our dog throws a parade (she's excitable...about EVERYTHING...so we joke that she's throwing a "parade" when she jumps all over the place over something).
  23. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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  24. isipwater

    isipwater Feeling the Heat

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    The local stove shop is coming to do the installation for our new Lopi Endeavor this Thursday, 9/19!!!

    I am wondering if anyone has any general tips, feedback, comments about the installation process.

    Is there any situations or things I should watch for or be asking the installer to make sure the installation is done well?

    This will be my very first wood stove! Thanks for your assistance.
  25. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    As I have an insert and not a stove I cannot tell you much about what to check when they do the install. Nevertheless, my golden rule for contractors/installers is:
    Treat them well and most likely they will treat you well.

    I would put all furniture and other stuff as far away from the installation side as possible. There will be a stove plus two to three people with tools around it; they will need room to work. I would clear the entire path they need to use to get a 600 lb stove into the house. I would make sure the attic is accessible and they can get to where the chimney will need to go through the ceiling and the roof. If you have a ladder that reaches to the roof maybe have it already out; saves them the hassle to get theirs out of the truck if they are ok with using yours. And a hot cup of coffee in the morning while discussing the details will surely not hurt either. ;)
    NortheastAl and isipwater like this.

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