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Painted hearth and insert

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by OKchiefsfan, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. OKchiefsfan

    OKchiefsfan New Member

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    Ed, I really like that mat and will look into getting one. I think I will clean up the top cut lines on my heatform so that it won't gouge into my new liner. While on that subject, where would you guys recommend me getting one? Looks like I will need a 6" x 15' with insulation. Ebay seems to be about the cheapest, but sometimes that isn't always best. What do you all think about the smooth liner as opposed to the rigid? I'm debating whether or not to take the firebricks out of my stove and give it a good cleaning. Does anybody have any tricks or tips on this? Thank you all for your replies!

    Phil

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  2. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    Clio Michigan
    Cool, I painted it brown to match the stove with high temp stove paint i found on-line. Good luck
  3. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    Definitely insulate generously above the block-off plate. Even better, consider filling the heatform itself with pour-in insulation between the 2 layers of the steel box, and then insulate on top of it as well. I didn't when I installed my insert this past fall (in an old heatform similar to yours) and it's amazing how much heat I lose up the chimney; that steel box sucks it up, and without insulation it's a straight shot to the sky. I'm convinced a modified (carved up) heatform like you and I have is even more vulnerable to heat loss this way than a full masonry fireplace. I'll be taking mine apart and redoing it before next season.

    When you say your chimney is only 13', where are you measuring to at the top? Does that height meet the minimum requirements of 3' above the high side of the roof penetration and 2' above any part of the building in a 10' radius?

    I think you're pushing your luck with the paint. When my stove is really going strong (especially when it's going a little stronger than intended) the masonry immediately above it can flirt with 200F.
  4. Ashful

    Ashful Minister of Fire

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    Only read half the replies, so forgive me if this has already been stated:

    1. A stove with ember-only hearth protection requirements will solve your concern over what is under the top course of brick.

    2. That paint on the hearth is going to look like hell after a few months of using your stove, setting tools and wood on it, etc. I'd remove it now for that reason alone.
  5. OKchiefsfan

    OKchiefsfan New Member

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    Jon1270, my chimney does meet the minimum requirements. I don't have much pitch to my roof. It was a huge pain when I crawled through my attic a few years ago to blow in some insulation.

    What is the liquid insulation called that you are talking about? I could sure fill up between the two layers of steel with no problem. I was also considering pouring a thin layer of concrete in my firebox for two reasons. First, the old mortar between the firebricks is not too good. Second, it would make it level from my hearth back to the back of my firebox. Does anybody see any reason why this would not be a good idea? The layer would be less than an inch thick.
  6. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    The pourable insulation isn't exacly liquid -- more like loose, lightweight concrete, I think. I believe it's basically vermiculite with a binder of some sort. The binder may very well be portland cement, but I don't really know. Here is one brand, but there are others.

    I don't know about yours, but my insert has leveling feet on the back so it's not necessary for the bottom of the fireplace to be perfectly level. If you do build it up then you want mortar, not concrete, for such a thin layer.
  7. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    Here is another, more common brand of pour-in insulation. For some reason the price of this stuff varies dramatically depending where you buy it, so shop around a bit.
  8. OKchiefsfan

    OKchiefsfan New Member

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    Jon1270......what about just stuffing it full of regular fiberglass insulation with the paper torn off? The reason I ask is because I have a bunch of that laying around and not being used. I am also 2 hours from the nearest Home Depot or Lowes.
  9. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    I don't believe fiberglass is considered acceptable, especially close to the chimney liner. There is such a thing as mineral wool insulation (the brand "Roxul" is one) but that will be special order too. As far as the distance to a big box store goes, that's what UPS is for. Just order what you need online.

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