Pear Trees

webfoot Posted By webfoot, Aug 15, 2009 at 12:44 PM

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  1. webfoot

    webfoot
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    Jan 15, 2009
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    I have a chance to harvest a very large pear tree and wood like to no how it burns,has anybody on here ever burned it befor?
    Someone told me it burns nice but it stinks when burned.
    Thanks for any imput!
     
  2. Dune

    Dune
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    Jan 14, 2008
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    Pear burns great, like apple and no it does't stink.
     
  3. Cory92

    Cory92
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    Oct 23, 2008
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    When I was a kid, we had three huge pear trees thet dropped loads of nasty grainy pears. My job was to clean up the yard from this while avoiding the yellow jackets that would descend on them.
    Now i relish any opportunity to burn pear. MUhaaahhaha!
     
  4. savageactor7

    savageactor7
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    Jan 25, 2008
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    Hi webfoot pear is very good. imo all fruit trees make excellent firewood but except for cherry it's tough to make good production with them...too labor intensive.
     
  5. Captain Hornet

    Captain Hornet
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    Nov 27, 2008
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    In our part of the country, we have a ton of pear trees. They are called " Bradford Pear " and they do not have any fruit on them. In the early spring they are very heavy flowered with a usually white, sometimes lite pink bloom that looks nice. These flowers really stink and some people find them objectionable. This tree is very heavy branched and is a fast growing , softer wood. These trees can not stand any ice and usually break apart in a heavy winter storm. There are lots of these around here as they were planted as landscape decoration. I have about three cords of this wood left over from the storm two years ago. I plan on burning it this year as a early season fuel. It burns like poplar and has about the same amount of heat. Captain Hornet.
     
  6. webfoot

    webfoot
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  7. DiscoInferno

    DiscoInferno
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    Nov 7, 2006
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    I went through a decent bit of Bradford Pear last year and it was a lot denser than poplar. It's in red oak territory or better density-wise, I would say, but seems to season faster.
     
  8. JotulOwner

    JotulOwner
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    Oct 29, 2007
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    Savageactor, please clarify your comment about Cherrywood. I just acquired quite a bit of it . I love the smell. I have burned it mixed with other wood, but I would really like to know if there are any issues with burning it without other wood species.
     
  9. savageactor7

    savageactor7
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    Jan 25, 2008
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    Cherry is excellent wood to burn in a wood stove..I was just say'en to webfoot that cherry wood is the best fruit wood as far as making cords per hour goes. The other fruit woods are also excellent it's just that they're imo hard to work and make significant cord production. Sorry to confuse you with my cryptic and arcane references.
     
  10. TreePapa

    TreePapa
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    Dec 24, 2008
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    Sounds like Bradford Pear makes better firewood than landscaping. The one we planted didn't get enuf sunlite and eventually died. The ones I've seen here that have done well aren't that special as far as landscape trees go, but they provide decent shade, for a relatively small tree. I'd burn it if someboy gave me some, but it's near the bottom of my list for landscape trees (somewhere above Tree of Heaven).

    Peace,
    - Sequoia
     
  11. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman
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    Feb 26, 2007
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    I get a lot of the Bradford Pear here, and like Captain Hornet said they tend to crack in bad weather, so there's usually some around for the taking. I like it; it ignites and burns easily, and throws decent heat-go for it.
     
  12. Jeb1heat

    Jeb1heat
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    Feb 12, 2008
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    The Bradford Pear seems to be the landscape tree du jour here in jersey. One in every yard. Luckily you guys give it the seal of approval, my neighbor just trimmed his big old one and now I've got a bunch of kindling.
     
  13. DiscoInferno

    DiscoInferno
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    Nov 7, 2006
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    Bradford pear is a bit of an abomination, really - it was bred to grow far faster than its soft wood can handle, and they tend to blow over or fall apart after 20-25 years or so. My street was planted with them back in the early 80's and most of the original ones are now gone. They branch everywhere and keeping up with the pruning is near impossible. Then when they fall or are cut down they sucker like mad.
     
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