Picked up a Russo

Gear Dog Posted By Gear Dog, Jan 18, 2011 at 2:58 PM

  1. Gear Dog

    Gear Dog
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    Jan 18, 2011
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    I've been looking to get a stove for some time now, but wasn't ready to spend the money. Then I came across this one that they were looking to trade on CL. I had an extra lawn mower that I got for free this fall he was interested in.
    Now the fun begins, I'm already looking at some of the hearts here for ideas. Now I also have an excuse to buy a chainsaw!!!
     
  2. Gear Dog

    Gear Dog
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    Jan 18, 2011
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    Here is a quick pic of the new to me stove.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. shawneyboy

    shawneyboy
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    Oct 5, 2010
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    Welcome to the forum !!!

    If you are going to be burning as primary heat. GET WOOD !!! You should get/have 2-3 years ahead if you can and have the storage space.
    Many wood sellers advertise that it is seasoned, most are not telling the truth. Seasoning starts when it is cut to length, AND split, AND stacked. Many dealers will sell you "seasoned" wood that has sit in log length for maybe a year if you are lucky, and they split it that day (very often) or maybe that week( sometimes).

    Oak needs a min. of 2 years to season. ( I am in PA so you will find the same).

    If you are going to process wood yourself, get the word out to friends, family, neighbors, everyone that you are looking for wood. Get as much as you can, and keep going.

    Enjoy the sight of the fuel oil truck/propane truck driving by, or of course the lower electricity bills, or NG bills.

    Read everything you can here, ask all those questions you have, and enjoy.

    Shawn
     
  4. Fsappo

    Fsappo
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    Apr 9, 2008
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    And so the "free woodstove will cost me money because now I have an excuse to buy the toys that go along with wood burning" saga begins. Enjoy your new stove. I sold a few Russos back in the day. Never heard a complaint on em.
     
  5. Gear Dog

    Gear Dog
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    Jan 18, 2011
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    Thanks guys, I have been looking around for wood. My neighbor has a few trees that are down I've got my eye on.
    I'm on the hunt for a nice chain saw, there are a few listed but all 14 & 16 inches. I need bigger!!!
     
  6. mark44667

    mark44667
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    Sep 26, 2011
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    anyone have any info on that wood stove i have one too and can't find anything is it airtight? it is truly bizzar looking lol
     
  7. begreen

    begreen
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    What model Russo? Is it an EPA stove?
     
  8. mark44667

    mark44667
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    Sep 26, 2011
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    it's really old a glassview 3gvr it was made in 1978 but looks brand new i think it's supposed to have a blower on it but it looks long gone i am not even sure if it is airtight
     
  9. webbie

    webbie
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    Nov 17, 2005
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    That was one of the first Russos - back then a decent fire view was rare because the ceramic glass was not yet out in the market in bulk. Also, glass got very dirty. Russo solved it by having a large tempered piece a distance from the fire AND having a steel door which could be opened and closed behind it. When you used the stove for long burns, etc you closed the door. When you opened the door, a large amount of air could come in across the glass and keep it clean.

    It worked pretty well.
     
  10. mark44667

    mark44667
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    Sep 26, 2011
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    so does this have the same distance requirements as any other wood stove? 18 inches i think from any combustable surface i am using tripple wall pipe outside and i am puting fire resistant sheetrock behind the stove with a hearth board i think it will be ok just kinda going overboard on safety also isn't it supposed to have some kind of grates in it? and is it airtight? sorry for all the questions
     
  11. webbie

    webbie
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    Nov 17, 2005
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    As with most other wood stoves, you have to either use generic standards (NFPA) or the label or manual that came with the stove.
    I doubt that stove is 18".
    You might actually be able to get a manual or clearances for it - Richard Russo is still around!

    It would be considered fairly airtight when the front steel door is closed...

    Fire resistant sheetrock does nothing for clearances. Please read up in our info section and elsewhere before installing. It might be a good idea to check with your local building and fire officials for a permit, etc. - if they are decent, they will help guide you to what is the best way to do all this.
     
  12. mark44667

    mark44667
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    Sep 26, 2011
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    i have already checked the building codes and say nothing about clearances but they require double wall chimney pipe also my outer walls are concrete block so not really worried about those catching on fire lol just the sheetrock on the inside thats why i was gonna put up the fire resistant stuff behind the stove just wanted to be on the safe side maybe i will just put the hearthboard up over the sheet rock but i am not certain i even need that with the triple wall pipe going through the wall with an insulated wall thimble i don't know i am just trying to make it as safe as possible
     
  13. webbie

    webbie
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    Nov 17, 2005
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    Fire resistant rock is not heat resistant!
    It is thicker and denser to stop fire (in a room) from spreading to the next room.

    If you want to keep the wall non-combustible, use wonderboard or dura-rock, etc. over the block....and steel studs if you need space.
     
  14. mark44667

    mark44667
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    Sep 26, 2011
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    thnk you for the info and again i am sorry for asking so many questions i am a curious person and don't like cobbling things up
     
  15. Treis

    Treis
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    Oct 10, 2014
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    Hi,
    I am a new homeowner and a friend of mine gave us a 1980 Russo wood/ coal stove. Unfortunately i have no manual.
    Could someone send me a copy of theirs, please.
     

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