Pine.. burn or not to burn?

mook1302 Posted By mook1302, Mar 6, 2013 at 11:07 AM

  1. mook1302

    mook1302
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    I have a ton of pine for i cut down about 15 75 ft pine trees beside my house.. i gave a lot away to people with outdoor wood burners but still have a lot left.. i was just going to use it for outdoor fires in the summer time but after reading i hear that as long as it seasoned its fine to burn inside but you just dont get long burn times out of it.

    I dont have it splitted but its been stacked in rounds for the last two years so i was going to split it this spring and mix it in with my hardwoods next year...

    bad idea or burn it up...?
     
  2. dougand3

    dougand3
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    Burn it after drying. My southern yellow pine gets to 15-20% MC after 9 months C/S/S in wind and sun. I love how it fires up so quickly on minimal coal bed.
     
  3. Nick Mystic

    Nick Mystic
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    I think it depends on the stove you're using. A modern EPA approved stove or insert with a catalytic combuster or secondary burn tubes should do fine burning pine. The key is to get a hot fire and mix the pine in with some hard wood. The pine will put off a lot of gasses, but that is where its heat is with the secondary burn. BTUs are BTUs regardless of what wood produces them. People who say, "don't burn pine because you'll get a lot of creosote in your chimney," are talking about slow burns without secondary burning taking place. I sure wouldn't waste all that pine you say you have available. I just worked up a pine tree that came down in a storm over two hears ago and it is in great burning shape due to being up off the ground that whole time.
     
  4. Slow1

    Slow1
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    Split it, dry it, and enjoy burning it. Free heat is free heat. Now if you have limited space and plenty of hardwood available for the same price, then I'd be biased to the hardwood simply due to BTU density. Keep some harder woods available if you have them for overnight etc.

    Nice that it is light weight to carry into the house... not so nice in that it just doesn't have the same heat potential/volume as denser woods.

    I've burned a decent amount of pine and other soft woods - picking it up I've learned to tell the giver we have a fire pit to avoid the lecture about burning my house down :)
     
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  5. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack
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    Pine being bad to burn is an Eastern myth. Pine doesn't produce anymore creosote then any other wood of the same moisture content . Wet wood (of any type) and poor burning practices is what makes creosote.
    Of course eastern pine won't burn as long as dry oak, but most woods don't burn as long as oak, so that doesn't mean anything, except you'll use more wood.
     
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  6. Scols

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    Right now I wish I had some pine for the mild days weve been having ,better than wasting oak .
     
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  7. firefighterjake

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    Burn 'er.

    Dropped an Eastern White Pine near my garage just the other day in an attempt to get better satellite reception . . . turned out that wasn't the issue . . . but now I don't have to worry about the pine landing on top of my garage AND I've got some wood for burning during the Fall and Spring burning seasons (or I can turn some into kindling.)
     
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  8. Ashful

    Ashful
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    I'd base my decision on whether or not to put effort into bucking and splitting it on how much hardwood I have. I have limited time to get my felling/bucking/splitting/stacking done, so I would not waste my time on it, unless I was short on seasoned hardwoods. It will burn fine, I've burned plenty of pine this year, and a cleaning two weeks ago showed near zero creosote.
     
  9. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack
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    You know the old saying, "A softwood in the hand is worth two hardwood in the bush".
     
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  10. mook1302

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    Nov 27, 2012
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    thats why i took all these trees down... i bet i took about 25 of these pines down total.. the most recently was three weeks ago i had a guy drop14 for me and i have them cut into 25 ft logs and a guy is gonna buy it off me, but i still have plenty on hand as you can see by the pictures below (these were fall of '11... so know i have the guy coming back out in a couple weeks and hes going to grind out 34 stumps for me... lol..

    i also have about 10 truck loads of hard wood in a pile that i need to split so you know what ill be doing on the weekends and evenings for the next couple months lol.. Either way i was going to split the pine for easier buring around campfires but just wanted to see what everyones elses consensus was first....


    . IMG00125-20110707-1805.jpg IMG00126-20110707-1806.jpg
     
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  11. Jags

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    It will make you go bald and is the main contributor to ED.

    Folks out west, in Canada and up in Alaska don't import wood. If it wasn't for needle trees, many would have nothing to burn.
     
  12. begreen

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    Split it large, dry it out well and burn it. It's great for shoulder season fires in your region. Or, if you have an overwhelming amount of hardwood too, sell it before it rots.
     
  13. MasterMech

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    Funny, those who say don't burn pine wouldn't think twice about tossing chunks of 2x4 into the stove. ;hm ;)
     
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  14. rideau

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    I never burned any pine before this year. Gave all mine away. Tried a few pieces I had left that I was using to elevate my hardwoods (pieces were several years old and still excellent quality), after burning them shoulder season, truely regretted the wood I had given away. Pine makes great wood for the shoulder season, or as a single front starter piece in a winter hardwood burn. Light to carry, lot of quick heat, very easy to start. Great for shoulder season because it takes the chill off the house very quickly, then you can let it burn out and light another fire the next evening. I disagree re it not being worth cutting if you have plenty of hardwood...serves a different purpose.
     
  15. westkywood

    westkywood
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    I agree with rideau. It is worth cutting and having around unless you are really strapped for space. I love having a cord or two of Pine, Maple, Cherry or other fast burning wood around here. It's great for starting fires, the shoulder season or just getting a hot fire going quick. If there is only hard wood around, you have to split some of it smaller for kindling. If you have Pine around, it's not necessary to split into kindling.
    A word of caution. Be careful loading up the stove with Pine. It can get out of hand quick....
     
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  16. fossil

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    Don't assume that it has seasoned a whole bunch while it's been stacked in rounds. You may be surprised just how wet it still is, because the two ends don't provide much surface area for the water to escape. Split some and check it out. After it's split it'll season much more effectively, because the exposed (non-barked-covered) surface area is much greater..

    As stated above, many of us burn softwoods exclusively, 'cause them's all we got. Well seasoned it burns just fine and keeps us perfectly warm. Rick
     
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  17. Oldhippie

    Oldhippie
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    I agree with Nick. Don't burn pine is what they used to say in pre EPA days.. Now, with the new stoves you can burn any kind of wood.
     
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  18. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    Just amazes me how many times this subject comes up and how many have heard that you can't burn pine in a stove. Even back way before the epa stoves came on the market folks burned pine. A lot of it was also used in wood cook stoves because it burns fast. Easy to regulate the amount of heat but don't throw heat too long for when grandma was cooking during the warmer months!
     
  19. Jags

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    But Dennis - you know it causes tooth decay.;lol
     
  20. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    Hum.... Maybe that is why the dentist was so curious the last time I was there?
     
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  21. Jags

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    For anybody that doesn't recognize the purpose of my silly responses...It is a backhanded way of showing how the "it will start a chimney fire" statement is a bit ridiculous. No - burning pine will not start a chimney fire. Bad burning practices will start a chimney fire.

    (But for the record - it will expand your waist line)
     
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  22. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack
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    Yeah, I keep hearing this stuff about how it use to be true you couldn't burn pine pre- EPA stove days....;hm
    Well I gota ask those saying that, what do you think we burned out West here before they ever came out with EPA stoves???
     
  23. dougand3

    dougand3
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    ummm, I'll go with "What is pine?" Alex
     
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  24. mook1302

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    lol well then looks like burn it is... hopefully going to go some splitting done this weekend suppose to get in the 50's...
     
  25. WoodpileOCD

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    If you haven't split it before, you'll be pleasantly surprised at how easily it will come apart. With that much of it, I would split most of it big. It will still burn for a decent amount of time if it has some size to it. I've easily done overnights with it in my Buck Cat stove. Big pieces though.
     
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