Plug UPS into surge suppressor?

P38X2 Posted By P38X2, Nov 25, 2013 at 9:47 AM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. P38X2

    P38X2
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 11, 2012
    1,670
    402
    Loc:
    Jaffrey, NH
    I have an APC BE750G on the way. Noticed it only had 450 Joules of suppression capability. I know very little about this protection, but my currently used Tripp Lite suppressor has a 1410 Joule rating.

    Should I plug the UPS into my existing surge protector?....or is that asking for trouble in some weird electronic physics sort of way?
     
  2. briansol

    briansol
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 18, 2009
    1,913
    293
    Loc:
    central ct
    My UPS manual specifically says NOT to do this.
     
    IHATEPROPANE likes this.
  3. IHATEPROPANE

    IHATEPROPANE
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 24, 2011
    1,387
    267
    Loc:
    NoPellettons, MA
    I have read not to do this as well....I am pretty much making this up but the UPS should switch to battery given any large spike so the joules may not matter as much
     
  4. briansol

    briansol
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 18, 2009
    1,913
    293
    Loc:
    central ct
    Honestly, I don't think it matters much. A direct hit to a line is going to fry anything you can afford to try to stop it. Have homeowners insurance, some basic to stop a jolt from when the drunk hits a pole down the street, and rest easy.
     
    IHATEPROPANE likes this.
  5. P38X2

    P38X2
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 11, 2012
    1,670
    402
    Loc:
    Jaffrey, NH
    Sounds good. Thanks :)
     
  6. EastMtn

    EastMtn
    Burning Hunk 2.
    NULL
    

    May 19, 2013
    205
    48
    Also, using attaching the UPS to a surge protector will void the warranty that comes from Tripp Lite in Tripp Lite's eyes. They will try and pass the buck and say that the surge protector manufacturer should pay the claim. Kind of like having dual coverage health insurance with two health providers. The two will fight over who is primary.

    UPS's provide great protection from brown outs, and what the electric utility industry calls partial lights or "no lights in part." This is dirty voltage or an inconsistent AC sine wave. Brown outs can cause permanent damage to Motors and circuit boards while providing power. It would be better to just trip the circuit rather than go through one of these repeatedly.

    Most residential transformers transform 3 phase voltage to multiple single phase sources to distribute the power more economically. However The 3 phase source to the transformer can lose one phase thus sending 2 phase power to a 3 phase designed circuit. The problem arises when the phase to ground fault is recognized by the protection equipment and doesn't trip fast enough or at all. The filters in some UPS's like Tripp lite are designed to take the voltage it is given and condition the sine wave to its pure form thus making the best of a bad situation.

    That was the executive summary without the vectors and trig. How'd I do?
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page