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Poll Question - Home Double Hung Replacement Windows Vs New Construction Windows?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by Don2222, Apr 29, 2014.

?

New Construction Windows or Replacement Windows?

  1. New Construction Windows - Less expensive, foam seal between jack and header studs and new casing

    4 vote(s)
    66.7%
  2. Replacement Windows - more expensive custom made but quick to install

    2 vote(s)
    33.3%
  1. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,960
    Loc:
    Salem NH
    Hello

    Which do you prefer?
    1. Replacement Windows - Quick and easy - Window Company approx $400 - $500 each
    2. New Construction Windows - Anderson Windows approx $250 each from Home Depot

    My neighbor gave me a replacement window a few years ago that would fit one of my opennings exactly, so I popped it in. Easy to do, we just took out the upper and lower window and side track. Then we put insulation on the top and bottom of the new repplacement window and sqeezed it in. All done and vinly inside and out.

    Currently I am replacing a few windows that I have not done so far. It takes time so I have been doing them as I can over the years.

    The full length outside screen is a nice feature. No more trying to change the screen with storm windows! :)

    I decided to go with the new construction windows and foam seal the area between the window and the studs in the wall. The worst part about the old windows is the drafty area around the window between the window and the studs. The new replacement windows do not even fix that area!

    The bonus with new construction windows is the new inside and outside window casing but more work to install. Also I do have outside paint and extra shingles because many of them do not fit exactly. That is the trick part but can be worth it!

    Pic 1 - old drafty window inside
    Pic 2 - old drafty window outside
    Pic 3 - old drafty window minus casing. See uninsulated space between window and wall studs
    Pic 4 - old window shows basement paint colors over the years. 60's Aqua
    Pic 5 - New Anderson 400 series in box1
    Pic 6 - New Anderson400 series in box2
    Pic 7 - New Anderson400 series in box3
    Pic 8 - New Anderson400 series inside with valance
    Pic 9 - New Anderson400 series inside with valance and blinds
    Pic 10 - New Anderson400 series outside with new plastic shutters

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 29, 2014

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  2. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
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    6,960
    Loc:
    Salem NH
    A few more pics

    Pic 11 - New Anderson400 series inside with wood sill
    Pic 12 - New Anderson400 series outside with shingles and with shutters

    Attached Files:

  3. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    4,809
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    If I can redo the outside trim easily and without issues, I prefer to do new construction and make sure there isn't any rot inside the structure and that it's completely weathertight and insulated. On an older house there are already enough holes to let wind and water through. Old houses could also have had a leak and damage that a previous owner caulked over and painted. The chance to get inside and seal them up is too good of an opportunity to pass up.
  4. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,960
    Loc:
    Salem NH
    Agree
    These windows do not fit so we have to make them fit! However I learned the Marvin Tilt Packs which seem like a great idea, do not make a tight fit in the old window frames and the screens are very expensive! The replacement windows custom made for the old window frames are a perfect fit but do not address the problem of old damaged sills and air leaks between the window frame and wall studs!

    These Anderson 400 series are very well built. Vinyl Clad Dual Pane Wood Frame Low E Glazing with Argon Gas.

    Do you know what these specs mean on the window sticker? Are they good?

    To qualify for a tax credit, the U-Factor must be 0.30 or lower! ! !

    Or
    To qualify for a tax credit, the SHGC must be 0.30 or lower! ! !


    This may help us?
    http://www2.buildinggreen.com/blogs/how-read-those-darn-window-performance-stickers

    U-Factor as opposed to R value?
    R-value measures resistance to heat flow; U-factor is the mathematical inverse (1 divided by R-value gives you U-factor), and measures the rate of that heat flow.
    In a cold climate a good U-factor for a window is between 0.17 and 0.39. (That's between R-6 and R-2.5)
    Lower is better with U-factor--the opposite of R-value

    Window sticker U-Factor
    0.29 J.S.(I-P) = 3.45 R-Value

    In cold climates on south-facing walls, a higher solar-heat-gain number is better--this supports "passive solar" heating. In this situation, an SHGC value of 0.42 to 0.63 is desirable, and higher is better. (In hot climates, look for values as low as 0.25.)

    Solar heat gain coefficient 0.31-- over .30 is better for NE

    Visible Transmittance
    0.54

    Summary
    Older single Pane windows are approx R-1
    According to DOE:
    "Common ENERGY STAR windows only have an R-value of 3
    The "30/30" rule is common: U-factors of under 0.30 (which is good) are often paired with SHGC's of under 0.30. That's a good target for the South. For colder climates, I would propose for discussion a "30/40" rule.

    Glass coatings are very important to pull the R-Value up.

    Here are some more comparison figures.

    Clear double pane
    U-Factor of 0.48 = R2.08

    Clear triple pane
    U-Factor of 0.37 = R2.70

    See pics below
    Click to Enarge

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: May 2, 2014
  5. TradEddie

    TradEddie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    677
    Loc:
    SE PA
    I ticked "replacement windows" because that's what I did, but now that I've eventually worked my way through my house replacing all the sashes, I'm beginning to rethink it. I had 1977 Andersen Narroline double hung windows. When we moved in ten years ago there were several that needed immediate replacement, but some were in remarkably good condition, although the very thin glass made for very poor insulation. Each year I've replaced a few more, replacing the last one in the fall . Originally I could get replacement Andersen sashes for about or even under $100 per sash, Low E, High Perf, pre-painted. Installation would typically take about ten minutes. The price gradually climbed, and was almost twice that for the last few sashes. Knowing more about air sealing, I may be removing the trim and sealing/insulating now anyway, so perhaps I would have been better to replace everything.

    TE
  6. Warm_in_NH

    Warm_in_NH Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2013
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    517
    Loc:
    central NH
    4-5 hundred seems really high for replacement windows. Is that the installed price?

    You already realized that replacement windows don't fix the the lack of insulation around the window frame or any leaks around the old frame. I feel that if the sashes are due for replacement the rest of the unit is too.

    That said my other house is old plaster lath walls and the wood work is integrated into the walls and windows and everything else. So replacement windows go in there so I don't have to mess with the trim. I replace the exterior part of the sills and address any exterior issues in the process though.
  7. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
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    6,960
    Loc:
    Salem NH
    Yes, that is the installled price, but installing them takes 15-20 mins, just pull the sashes and pop in these!

    Here is a similar quality window to the Anderson which is highly rated

    The price is approx $450 Installed
    Okna Insul-Tec 500 Series - Double Hung Dual Glased with ESP(Energy Savings Package)
    http://www.oknawindows.com/products/replacement_windows/500 Series/index.stml?portalProcess_dd_0_1_4=showPublicItem&inventory_entry_id=3842

    Okna spec for Dual Glased with ESP

    Window sticker U-Factor
    0.28 J.S.(I-P) = 3.45 R-Value

    SHGC = Solar heat gain coefficient
    0.30

    VT = Visible Transmittance
    0.55

    CR = Condensation Resistance
    62

    Energy Star
    0.30

    Anderson Spec

    Window sticker U-Factor
    0.29 J.S.(I-P) = 3.45 R-Value

    SHGC = Solar heat gain coefficient
    0.31

    Visible Transmittance
    0.54
  8. Lake Girl

    Lake Girl Minister of Fire

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    Nov 12, 2011
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    1,512
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    I prefer new construction windows plus I seal that joint with a butyl tape from Menards.
    http://www.protectowrap.com/flashings-building-tape/bt20xl-butyl/

    When we installed new windows in our condo as part of a building envelope redo (removed stucco and used panel system), engineer commented we were the only one that had installed the windows properly with the butyl tape to form air and water barrier.
  9. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    6,960
    Loc:
    Salem NH
    That is good info thanks, the tape goes over the 2x4 under the sill and then over the nail flanges after the window is nailed in. Thanks

    RESULTs

    Well the 1st results are in.

    With NO heat on all night, Early this morning it was 39.0 Degrees F outside and 68 Degrees in the living room and 69 degrees in the bedrooms. So let the savings begin to help Pay for the windows! ! !
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
  10. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    6,960
    Loc:
    Salem NH
    Yes, we added Spray Foam between the window and the studs in the framing. Did you do that?
    See pic below

    Attached Files:

  11. Enzo's Dad

    Enzo's Dad Member

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    132
    Loc:
    Canton, CT
    This is kind of an open ended question, not seeing your house in person and knowing what kind of siding and trim you have it is hard to answer this question. I personally have used Harvey Industries replacement windows twice, and could bot be more thrilled. I used the spray foam as well. The going rate on vinyl replacement windows is 350-400 installed, but they will haul off the old windows. The thing with replacement windows is who will be doing the install, and how good are they.

    Personally I think new construction windows would open a whole can of worms, You may break trim, or clapboards. If I was doing that i would take all of the siding off and put a house wrap up. When i repainted my house i took all of the clap boards (I had so many that had dry rot it was easier to fix and replace then paint) off and added tyvec, huge difference.

    http://harveybp.com/slimline-double-hung-vinyl-window.aspx
    Last edited: May 10, 2014
  12. Warm_in_NH

    Warm_in_NH Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2013
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    517
    Loc:
    central NH
    We always insulate any available space when putting in new windows, it makes all the difference. Often when replacing older windows that have weight pockets, the installer never insulates the weight pockets because it's time consuming, eats up a bunch of insulation, and no one ever knows the difference. I won't put them in without drilling holes in the sides, and filling the weight pockets with foam prior to ever setting the new replacement window into place.

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