1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Poplar firewood?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by blthomas, Oct 20, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. blthomas

    blthomas New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Messages:
    34
    Loc:
    Culpeper, VA
    Being a overall newb, I want to know is Poplar good for burning?

    The ad I posted in the wanted section is just a few miles from my house, thinking of starting to pile up some wood to split. It's all been down since March.

    Poplar good for burning yes or no? If no I have plenty of down red and white Oak to get from the family farmlands.

    Thanks,
    Blair

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Greg123

    Greg123 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    Messages:
    196
    Loc:
    WNY
    Oak is much better then Poplar, there is nothing wrong with Poplar, it just burns real fast, its good for burning in the Fall and early spring, but Oak is by far more superior for those cold winter nights.
  3. bruce56bb

    bruce56bb New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    333
    Loc:
    Flint Hills of Kansas
    no! not if you have access to oak. it will burn but the btu output is much lower than the oaks.
  4. Gibbonboy

    Gibbonboy New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Messages:
    267
    As my best friend says, "it'll all burn". I wouldn't go out of my way to get it, and I certainly wouldn't pay for it. We have a bunch of poplar trees, they die off in large numbers and have to come down. The wood is not very dense, it's at the very low end of hardwoods. It is like a sponge- it will re-absorb water at an incredible rate. But once dried properly, it will burn just fine. We usually save it for bonfires, but it will do in a pinch if you don't mind loading more often. It also rots quickly, so keep it dry and off the ground.
  5. blthomas

    blthomas New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Messages:
    34
    Loc:
    Culpeper, VA
    Thanks guys.

    FWIW, I wouldn't be paying for the poplar. If I buy anything it'll be Oak from one of the good ol' boys local.

    The Poplar is downed from a guy about 10 miles away who is building a pond. It's in log form.

    However, I have tons and tons of Oak at Grandma's and Mom's already downed, some is already limbed, just waiting to be bucked.

    I'll just concentrate on that, I can buck and pile until I'm blue in the face and split at a later date.

    Thanks again,
    Blair
  6. Greg123

    Greg123 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    Messages:
    196
    Loc:
    WNY
    Good Choice, Don’t waste your energy on the Poplar, if there is Oak around.
  7. Gibbonboy

    Gibbonboy New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Messages:
    267
    I'd put the poplar closest to the street, so it gets stolen first! :smirk:
  8. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,126
    Loc:
    Midwest
    Ditto to what everyone else has said. Actually it is not terrible wood for taking the chill off a room on the early fall / late spring days...times when you don't want a full blown heating fire. It won't burn worth a cent when it is wet. Dry, each log will weigh about 2 pounds and smell like newspaper when it burns.

    Corey
  9. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    4,846
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    I'd pick the poplar up. You will burn through it fast, but you will also keep one of your oaks growing for another year. The poplar is only going to rot. You might as well get some use from it.

    Matt
  10. KateC

    KateC New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    166
    Loc:
    Arizona
    Hah!! Hi again Blair! ''Popple'' is a subjict near and dear to my heart, a la Warren and his infamous ELM----we got tons of it free in the spring----it's easy enough to process and actually dries relatively fast, but also burns fast and doesn't exactly ''cook you out''. While re-stacking The Boyscout's rush-job, I find that a good percentage is rotted even being off the ground and the coals aren't hot enough to get my cherry going. But since it's free and we have the space to let it dry we'll mix it in and/or save it for mild weather.
  11. cogger

    cogger Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Messages:
    193
    Right -- do not pay for poplar. It's soft but still considered in the hardwood class cause it's not a class of pine.... Burns quickly but hell it heats!
  12. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,859
    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
  13. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    28,634
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    In Culpepper, VA where the OP resides it means Lirodendron tulipifera or tulip poplar. We have a bunch of them suckers here.
  14. jabush

    jabush Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2006
    Messages:
    385
    Loc:
    Howard County, MD
    Same here BB. I came across some big rounds of Lirodendron tulipifera mixed in with the pile the wood guy brought. That must have been the "extra" he said he threw in. Definitely more dense than the Populus tremuloides (quacking aspen/popple) that grows here.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page