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problem circulating the heat

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by jcarlos, Sep 17, 2008.

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  1. jcarlos

    jcarlos New Member

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    foster ri
    I bought a Harman P68 2yrs ago have never been able to circulate the heat out of the basement. I have cut grate in the floor,
    tried fans in the door casings nothing. I have put 3 thermometers at 3 different locations in the basement,ranging between 90
    directly in front to low 70's on the opposite side of basement. The house is 1000 sq ft per floor. At the very least the basement should be unbearable. Any ideas would be appreciated.

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  2. elmoleaf

    elmoleaf Feeling the Heat

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    If the basement is uninsulated concrete walls and slab on grade, then most of the heat is going into the concrete. So moving heat elsewhere might be problematic.
    If it's insulated, then you're better off. In the very least, you need some way for cold to fall to the basement and warm air to rise. The grate is half the equation. Is there a stairwell or other opening?
  3. jcarlos

    jcarlos New Member

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    there is a stairwell within 10 feet of the stove and a 12x12 grate at the farthest point from the stove. There is no insulation on the
    foundation.
  4. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Outside combustion air may help? Most basements have negative pressure so it's hard to get the heat up. Try a fan in that floor grate blowing down to create a possitive pressure and maybe it will push the heat up the stairwell. I also agree the bare concrete is soaking up a lot of heat.
  5. jcarlos

    jcarlos New Member

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    just the flue piping for the stove itself. Are you suggesting to bring in fresh air?
  6. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Either insulate the basement and move into it, or move the stove upstairs to where you live. I'm not tryin' to be a smart-ass here, I'm just sayin' that these appliances, be they pellet stoves or woodstoves, are space heaters. Moving the warm air from the space where the appliance is located to remote areas of our homes is a challenge we all face in one way or another. Your appliance is located in a basement...the appliance is doing its job, it's heating the space in which it was installed. If you insulate the hell out of the basement, then the basement will get even hotter, and the upstairs probably only marginally so...but if you can't move the stove, then that's the place to start. Rick
  7. hoverfly

    hoverfly Minister of Fire

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    Yes give it a shot.
  8. MCPO

    MCPO Minister of Fire

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    Exposed concrete soaks up heat like a sponge.
    Trying to heat an uninsulated basement with expectations of some heat rising to living areas is unlikely.
  9. Shortstuff

    Shortstuff Feeling the Heat

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    I would have to emphasize what has already been said about the uninsulated concrete walls that they are the major problem. As with any heat, every single item in that basement whether it be a pile of clothes or boxes of stuff - and especially the walls - wll absorb the heat until they themselves reach the air temperature. You're not just heating the air, you're heating everything that is in there. Once that has been acquired then there will be heat that can rise and be of some use.

    If keeping the stove in your basement is paramount, then I would consider a complete basement insulation. Even if you purchased a couple dozen of those 2" thick hard pink insulation panels that interlock and stick them on the walls with a couple of drops of construction adhesive, more of an experiment, you'd be suprised at how much of a difference even those can make.

    More suggestions will come to you here and good luck!

    Steve
  10. slls

    slls Minister of Fire

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    Sorry to say I don’t think your P 68 will give out enough heat to do the job you want. I heated from a full concrete cellar for years. 10 X 12 inch grate over the stove and open door to cellar at other end of house. Took lots of heat to get it up to the living area, it was hot in the cellar, freezer in cellar was running all the time LOL. Could not work long in the cellar at my shop end, too hot.
    It is a wood and coal stove, still have it but don't use it much.
    My CB1200 pellet is going in my living room.
  11. kinsmanstoves

    kinsmanstoves Minister of Fire

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    Very good point by numerous people.

    Bring the stove upstairs.

    Eric
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